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Bulletins from Dallas: Reporting the JFK Assassination
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Bulletins from Dallas: Reporting the JFK Assassination

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really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  39 ratings  ·  12 reviews
An in-depth look at one of the twentieth century's star reporters and his biggest story.

Thanks to one reporter’s skill, we can fix the exact moment on November 22, 1963 when the world stopped and held its breath: At 12:34 p.m. Central Time, UPI White House reporter Merriman Smith broke the news that shots had been fired at President Kennedy's motorcade. Most people think W
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Hardcover, 280 pages
Published November 1st 2016 by Skyhorse
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really liked it 4.00  · 
Rating details
 ·  39 ratings  ·  12 reviews


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Kristine
Mar 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing
A really fascinating look at how one of the biggest stories ever was reported. We don't often think about the details of how information gets to the public; we take for granted that someone has a job of informing the world of what is going on, and doing so accurately in moments of chaos and confusion. In a time before Twitter, before cable news, before the instantaneous ability to share knowledge and information, Merriman Smith was able to get word out that something had happened to JFK within 4 ...more
Kristine Hall
Before I started reading Bulletins from Dallas: Reporting the JFK Assassination, I considered myself fairly well-schooled in the events surrounding that terrible event. What I had never considered (or learned about) is that the reporting of the tragedy is a story in itself. Bulletins tells the story of Merriman Smith (another tragic story) and Smith’s job as a designated White House reporter for UPI. The story is very much about the nature of the press in relation to the events of the times and ...more
Ken Dowell
Jul 27, 2017 rated it liked it
A story about old school journalism. About drinking, smoking, poker-playing journalists. Guys who would push each other off a cliff to get the story first.

More specifically it’s about Merriman Smith, UPI White House correspondent for 26 years. He covered six Presidents, starting with FDR and ending with Nixon. He was there for the bombing of Pearl Harbor, for the detonation of an atomic bomb on Japan, for the Cuban missile crisis, and, above all else, the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963
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***Nic's Review!!***

I received a complementary book for my honest review.

Just before reading Bulletins from Dallas: Reporting the JFK Assassination, I had a big discussion with my son about John F Kennedy, only to find my son knew more than I did. I have always been fascinated by this most tragic event that happened to President Kennedy. I thought I knew just about all I could know, but I was sorely mistaken. I learned far more than expected while reading this book.

Among the many new bits of inf
...more
Roxie Radish
Mar 06, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I read this as a book club pick and while I would t have picked it on my own I’ll be forever glad I read it. What I thought was going to be a retelling of JFKs assassination was so much more. It is the story of Merriman “Smitty” Smith, his life and career as a White House journalist. This book paints a beautiful picture of a time when print journalism was the top way to get your news and touches on the media coverage of presidents from FDR to Nixon. About 1/3 of the book tells the story of the a ...more
Frank Murtaugh
May 14, 2019 rated it really liked it
Terrific account of one of history's biggest moments, as the news broke . . . and HOW the news broke. The book is a time capsule, as news now "breaks" via tweets and text messages. "Way back" in 1963, human beings had to find telephones (with wires!) and connect with responsible writers/editors/publishers to let the world know when significant events occurred.

Merriman Smith was a reporter's reporter. Stretched rules in the interest of being first to report a big story . . . but not so much to be
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David Christensen
Feb 11, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: journalism
I loved reading about the way journalism and white-house coverage used to be in a older more innocent time. The author has a great writing style - keeps you on the edge of your seat. I got this reference from a writer friend - a book I never would’ve picked myself. I love it when taking a risk on a book turns out so thoroughly entertaining - and educational.
Ruthie Jones
Mar 02, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: lone-star-lit
Bulletins from Dallas: Reporting the JFK Assassination chronicles the career of A. Merriman Smith (Smitty) as a Pulitzer prize-winning White House correspondent for UPI. By the time the Kennedy assassination occurred in 1963, Smitty had been part of the White House press pool for several presidencies. On November 22, 1963, Smitty was at the top of his game as he rode in the press wire car in that fateful motorcade in Dallas.

Bill Sanderson offers readers a rare view of this historic event by plac
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Nicole
Feb 26, 2017 rated it really liked it
Just before reading Bulletins from Dallas: Reporting the JFK Assassination, I had a big discussion with my son about John F Kennedy, only to find my son knew more than I did. I have always been fascinated by this most tragic event that happened to President Kennedy. I thought I knew just about all I could know, but I was sorely mistaken. I learned far more than expected while reading this book.

Among the many new bits of information I learned, I discovered that Albert Merriman Smith, aka Smitty w
...more
Robert
Nov 20, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A view of new reporting from a different time.

I enjoyed learning about Mr. Smith and the way he brought Americans a view of the White House in the mid twentieth century. He, being an eyewitness to the most written about single event in the past century is documented in this book perfectly. The author gives us a glimpse into not only the time being reported on but a view of the man who reported on it. I finished this book in less two days.
Rachel Sonnenberg
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Jul 29, 2017
Mark B
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Robert Morrow
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Dec 07, 2016
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Dec 26, 2016
Marc Ryan
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Skyhorse Publishing
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Douglas Fugate
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Alan Hinton
Mar 30, 2017 rated it liked it
Pretty interesting book to me, since I had a career in journalism and have always been fascinated by the Kennedy assassination. The book focused on Merriman Smith, the UPI reporter who was in the motorcade and his efforts to tell the story, but it also told of what others in the media did on that fateful day.
Denis
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Dec 29, 2016
John K.
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Sheryl Turner
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Dave
Apr 22, 2017 rated it really liked it
The tragic events of November 22nd, 1963 have always facanatied me.
This book is a good look at how the news was reported that terrible day.
Merrimam Smith, UPI White House reporter was the first to report the story, within 4 minutes of the gun shots.
This book looks at his life before, during and after.
The book also shows how other reporters got the news out that day.
Long before smart phones, texting, or internet...this reminds us of how the news used to be reported.
I learned a few things myse
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