Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “El demonio de la perversidad” as Want to Read:
Blank 133x176
El demonio de la perve...
 
by
Edgar Allan Poe
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Read Book* *Different edition

El demonio de la perversidad

3.74  ·  Rating details ·  1,665 ratings  ·  169 reviews
El demonio de la perversidad es un relato corto del escritor estadounidense Edgar Allan Poe del ano 1845. La obra trata esencialmente de los impulsos autodestructivos que mueven al narrador, impulsos que el autor identifica con el "demonio de la perversidad." El narrador describe este principio como un agente espiritual que obliga a las personas a hacer cosas por el mero h ...more
Paperback, 26 pages
Published January 26th 2015 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform (first published August 12th 1845)
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 3.74  · 
Rating details
 ·  1,665 ratings  ·  169 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of El demonio de la perversidad
Michael
Jun 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is one of the more structurally unusual of Poe's tales. And that's saying a lot! It begins as an essay in which Poe describes the impulse to do wrong precisely because we know it's wrong. But wait, you might say. That's crazy! People are rational! They'd never do that! This is what Poe called "the pure arrogance of the reason"--the arrogance to assume that people are always reasonable, that if you only explained what's right and what's wrong to them, they'd choose to do what's right. Poe ha ...more
Janete
Nov 10, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
Another brilliant and extraordinary short story by Edgar Allan Poe! This is about the remorseful killer's confession. Audiobook in Portuguese. ...more
Sarah
'We stand upon the brink of a precipice. We peer into the abyss – we grow sick and dizzy. Our first impulse is to shrink from the danger. Unaccountably we remain. By slow degrees our sickness, and dizziness, and horror, become merged in a cloud of unnameable feeling. By gradations, still more imperceptible, this cloud assumes shape, as did the vapor from the bottle out of which arose the genius in the Arabian Nights. But out of this our cloud upon the precipice's edge, there grows into palpabil ...more
mwana
I can't do this story justice. What Edgar manages to explore about human nature and our intended purpose. Michael's review, would do it far greater justice than I ever could.

Enjoy.
...more
Jon Nakapalau
Jul 29, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics, crime, favorites
Unique perspective on that which leads us astray - Poe has the unique gift of making the logical seem confused; we become lost in his reasoning and must follow him as guide out of the darkest regions of our soul.
Majenta
Dec 19, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"It is quite a common thing to be thus annoyed with the ringing in our ears, or rather in our memories, of the burthen of some ordinary song, or some unimpressive snatches from an opera. Nor will we be the less tormented if the song itself be good, or the opera air meritorious."

...more
Brian
Jul 15, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: short-stories
I presently work in a call center and as the end of my shift neared I had this overwhelming urge to stand up and sing the Muppet Babies song over the cubicles.

Thus, the Imp of the Perverse....
Quirkyreader
Jun 22, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Be careful of what you say in public. Who knows what will happen.
Jack Heath
3 Stars. Edgar Allan Poe can be exasperating. A genius but his thoughts are sometimes hard to follow - like this one. It's not difficult to imagine that some in his time thought him to be mad. He surely must have been exhausting in person. As the personal fades, we are left collectively amazed at his virtuosity and creativity, his astounding suppleness with words, his breadth of knowledge, and his understanding of evil. In " The Imp .." we watch as a man's psyche destroys him as he contemplates ...more
David Doyle
You have a big exam tomorrow, you know it's vital to study but you're struck by the urge to do something else, anything else, but study. Or when waiting for a train and you have that little voice saying, "what if you jumped in front of it?" There's a term for that self-destructive behavior, for doing something wrong merely because it's possible, and it was coined by Edgar Allan Poe as the title for this story.

I don't want to give too much away, but the main character of this story comes into ill
...more
Sidharth Vardhan
You know the feeling you get when standing in a high place, the sudden urge to jump .... well, that is imp of the perverse for you. If Poe was still alive, I would have been worried about mental well being. Me, I'm more of a throw -other-person-off-the-cliff-for-fun-of-it kind of person. ...more
Mar
Oct 05, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics, 2015, thriller
Short, psicological, meaningful, strange... Poe is just magnific.
 Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu
This short story begins as an essay on the nature of humanity, what drives us is the question that is posed. Is it intelligence, the rational and logical? Is it emotional, the dramatic and sometimes flawed? Poe assesses these quandaries of his era with a bit of hyperbole, examining the science of the day. What the reader considers a philosophical ramble turns to something much more. A man's narrative of a heinous act that he performs. He examines the logical and the emotional, but ponders the un ...more
Elizabeth
Skilled story working entirely upon the psychological for its horror. The horror is not the murder itself but one's own nature, and indeed it is the main character's own nature which gets him hanged. And yet it is an impulse we can all identify with, the feeling when at the top of tall buildings to throw oneself off, when waiting for the train to hurl oneself onto the tracks, all the stronger for the greater we fear its consequences, we fear that we will do what we fear the most. Chilling as eve ...more
Kate
Mar 15, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Have you ever experienced "fits of perversity"... a moment where you feel you should do the wrong thing simply because it is wrong?

I have long loved Poe's idea that there is a Imp of the Perverse behind these impulses. Was great to finally read the actual story and hear it in his tongue.
Poe has a beautiful way of putting things.
...more
gabi
Oh, that ending. This is why I love Edgar Allen Poe. How he portrays horror and madness is amazing.
Jim Robles
Jul 22, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This (very short) one is available at;

http://poestories.com/read/imp

and I recommend it.

"I am not more certain that I breathe, than that the assurance of the wrong or error of any action is often the one unconquerable force which impels us, and alone impels us to its prosecution."

The bottom line is that we are all more prone to akrasia than askesis.

The fifty-first "book" (AKA book, short story, essay, etc. that I wanted to track.)

"If we cannot comprehend God in his visible works, how then in his
...more
Siobhan
Dec 04, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
The Imp of the Perverse is a story that had potential, but it read too much like other work from the author for me to enjoy it. The start was a bit of a rambled musing, then the events came together quickly. It is a nice little jolt for those who have not read Poe before, but it was clear what was coming to those who have read a lot of his work.

All in all, The Imp of the Perverse was not for me.
Zeinab Tajouri
Nov 27, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I realy loved this one, Had read it more than once though, Four times and I understood more each time..
Perfect analyzation of the main character, his fear of consequences more than the murder it self .. Every detail and explanation was very logical and I agree and feel it too, Not on the attempt of murder, but I just love this madness.
Tom
Nov 14, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This edition contains the following:
Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Works by Charles Baudelaire - 3 Stars
This piece although written with good intentions to present a tribute of admiration for Poe's talent does however, present many facts in this memorial which prove erroneous including his birthdate [true birthyear 1809] and birthplace [true birthplace Boston].
"Notes: Baudelaire’s memoir of Poe was originally published in 1852, in French. It is largely taken from Griswold’s memoir of Poe, John R
...more
Barry
Feb 10, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
This story was referenced in Haidt’s “The Happiness Hypothesis.” The Imp of the Perverse is that little voice in your head that when you are standing at a cliff edge bizarrely tells you to jump. Or in my case it was the voice that told me to go ahead and test it when I noticed that the pair of tweezers in my hand seemed to perfectly fit into the electrical socket. I was in 6th grade, and hopefully I’ve learned to ignore that idiotic voice since then. In this story, the narrator commits the perfe ...more
Heaven Yassine
Comment mieux décrire le démon de la perversité que par cet extrait :

We stand upon the brink of a precipice. We peer into the abyss - we grow sick and dizzy. Our first impulse is to shrink from the danger. Unaccountably we remain.
By slow degrees our sickness, and dizziness, and horror, become merged in a cloud of unnameable feeling. By gradations, still more imperceptible, this cloud assumes shape, as did the vapor from the bottle out of which arose the genius in the Arabian Nights. But out of
...more
David Blynov
Dec 17, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Poe explores why the seemingly rational willpower of man is occasionally disrupted by an impulsive and self-destructive "imp of the perverse".

Why is it that when we stand on the edge of a precipice, below which lies death, an urge to jump follows?

"There is no passion in nature so demoniacally impatient, as that of him who, shuddering upon the edge of a precipice, thus meditates a Plunge"

How does one even go about overcoming this incessant and unrelenting song of impulsive despair? Can man ever t
...more
Izzati
Aug 28, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
A work of Poe and I dare rate it a 2 star?! Yes, unfortunately I have to be honest with myself and fair to his other great works.

This didn't excite me except for a few sentences. I felt like the first few paragraphs were full of yada yadas, the kind of long-winded crap someone who's skilled with words can pull out of their ass to feed us word and story lovers. It reminds me of Will Smith when he's trying hard not to answer questions (love the guy, but he can really turn things around without rev
...more
Jim
Aug 05, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
a thinking piece at the outset, but rather insane and schizo by the end... Poe does well in explaining how easily people accept the form-function idea, he is obviously a smart guy, or was until he died anyway... another "Out-Heroded Herod" reference... Poe likes his protagonists to have their perversity and eat it too... you only live once, huh? this would make a wonderful film short, or claymation piece... ...more
Nancy
Oct 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2019
Finished: 03.10.2019
Genre: short story
Rating: A+++
#RIPXIV Challenge
Conclusion:
This is a masterpiece if you take the time
to 'slow read'...4 pages, 16 paragraphs.
I did.

My Thoughts



...more
Neelam Babul
Apr 06, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Chilling to the bones. It is a little difficult to keep track and make sense of it in the beginning but as the story unfolds you feel the amazing writing take over and keep you gripped.

A nice paranormal horror tale.
~☆~Autumn♥♥☔ Wells
I read this long ago and it really struck me back then. It was required. I need to read it again as I only recall thinking this was a sure terrifying truth.
JL Shioshita
Poe took a look at that strange impulse we all feel when looking over the edge of a precipice, that urge to jump, gave it a name, and put it in a story. I think most people can relate.
K. Anna Kraft
I have arranged my takeaway thoughts into a haiku:

"All hear the void's call,
Only the grossly weak-willed
Point to it with blame."
...more
« previous 1 3 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • The Terrible Old Man
  • The Outsider
  • The Statement of Randolph Carter
  • What the Moon Brings
  • The Haunter of the Dark
  • From Beyond
  • The Beast in the Cave
  • Polaris
  • The Other Gods
  • The Temple
  • The Alchemist
  • Azathoth
  • The Unnamable
  • Celephaïs
  • The Shadow Out of Time
  • The Tree
  • The Festival
  • Herbert West: Reanimator
See similar books…
See top shelves…
21,325 followers
The name Poe brings to mind images of murderers and madmen, premature burials, and mysterious women who return from the dead. His works have been in print since 1827 and include such literary classics as The Tell-Tale Heart, The Raven, and The Fall of the House of Usher. This versatile writer’s oeuvre includes short stories, poetry, a novel, a textbook, a book of scientific theory, and hundreds of ...more

Related Articles

"Horror fiction has traditionally dealt in taboo.… It makes monsters of household pets and begs our affection for psychos. It...
579 likes · 764 comments
“There is no passion in nature so demoniacally impatient, as that of him who, shuddering upon the edge of a precipice, thus meditates a Plunge.” 32 likes
“If we cannot comprehend God in his visible works, how then in his inconceivable thoughts, that call the works into being?” 17 likes
More quotes…