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Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before

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3.57  ·  Rating details ·  428 ratings  ·  85 reviews

If Albert Kim has learned one thing in his tragic adolescence, it's that God (probably a sadistic teenaged alien) does not want him to succeed at Bern High. By the end of sophomore year, Al is so tired of humiliation that he's chosen to just forget girls and high school society in general, and enjoy the Zen-like detachment that comes from being an intentional loser.

Then he
...more
386 pages
Published September 30th 2008 by Hyperion
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Average rating 3.57  · 
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 ·  428 ratings  ·  85 reviews


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Thomas
Mar 28, 2009 rated it really liked it
Albert Kim totally made this book for me, believe it or not. The story is about this socially awkward teenager, who has never experienced high school popularity or any social connection with basically anyone from his school. One summer he gets a job at a hotel and meets this really hot/nice girl, and gradually they fall for each other... but the thing is, this girl is really popular. So when the school year starts, you can imagine how difficult it would be for the two of them to have a ...more
Jen
Apr 07, 2009 rated it really liked it
First off - I loved this narrator. Sure, he was so immature that he made you cringe much of the time. Just like you'll yell "Don't go in there!" to a girl in a horror movie you'll want to sew up Albert's tongue half the time: making him unable to do or say one of the hundreds of things he does or says throughout the book. I think that's what I loved so much about this book - it was such a spot on representation of how dumb and self centered some boys and girls can be at (ahem) some ages.

The
...more
Dana Baldus
Jun 23, 2014 rated it it was ok
I'm mixed on how I feel about this book. It had a lot of things I liked about it, but it could easily distract me from all of its good points with a number of bad ones. I guess it had a bit of a "Chicken Little" effect for me, where you're supposed to like the main character, but you're not really sure why. Don't get me wrong, Albert is a very unique character, but every time he did something that made me laugh or relate to him (and trust me, I can relate to this character), he either thought or ...more
Ari
Aug 16, 2009 rated it liked it
I didn't like this book as much as I thought I would but I still enjoyed it. I think I was expecting more laugh-out-loud humor, but the humor here is more dry and you may miss some of the references and jokes. My biggest problem with Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before was Albert. It's not good when you don't like the main character. Perhaps I was like the rest of the kids at Albert's school, succumbing to the spell of The House. I thought Albert acted like an almost completely clueless ...more
Chris Tsang
Nov 24, 2010 rated it it was amazing
My goodness, if I counted the times I laughed out loud while reading this book, it would be countless. I've never laughed so much while reading a book before.
Sam McGraw
Oct 12, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

Albert Kim is living the loser's life at Bern High, and he is having some major social issues. But, he finds this amazing girl who just happened to break up with her jock boyfriend, and things seem to be working out. This, to me, sounds like a somewhat typical viewpoint of a high school guy. I believe that David Yoo, the author, wrote this story so he could relate some of the problems he faced growing up as an Asian American in an American high school. The entire story is aimed towards teenagers

...more
Shannon
Oct 17, 2016 rated it really liked it
Overall, this book was a fun read. The writing style and plot of David Yoo's "Stop Me if YOU've Heard this One Before" shares a striking resemblance to that of Sherman Alexie's "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian". Both present various tragedies through the humorous lens of a pessimistic adolescent.

As a future English teacher, I would recommend this book to my students because it discusses so many of the problems young adults face. Social status, popularity, young love, first time
...more
Rebecca
Dec 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
So funny. A smart, coming-of-age book about an Asian-American boy with strict parents, holding tight to their culture. Boy secures summer job with pretty, popular girl and his inner dialog is hysterical. Great easy read.
BAYA Librarian
Jan 21, 2009 rated it liked it
Shelves: realistic, historical
R While David Yoo is ridiculously fantastic at capturing the painful and irrational emotions of social hermit Albert Kim breaking his way into high school life with his first girlfriend, the plot of "Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before" feels overwritten with many superfluous details. The story takes place in the 1980s, made foggily clear by references that make the characters seem outdated and really pretentious about only listening to old bands and remembering "the good ol' days" that they ...more
Heather
Feb 17, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: ya-reads
Rating A+

Summary I've said before that I'm kind of a big fan of David Yoo's work and that, I believe, it's equally hard to write incredibly funny stuff as it is to write "poignant" or "dramatic" stories. And, travelling on that same road, Yoo one-up's himself with his sophomore novel, Stop Me If...

This book is equal parts funny (actually hilarious), heart-breaking, and thoughtful. The characters were actually better drawn, more mature, than they were in Girls for Breakfast. For example, the
...more
Alyssa N
Apr 29, 2016 rated it liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Jennifer Wardrip
Reviewed by Bookluver_Carol for TeensReadToo.com

If Albert Kim has learned one thing in his tragic adolescence, it's that God (probably a sadistic teenage alien) does not want him to succeed at Bern High.

By the end of sophomore year, Al is so tired of humiliation that he's chosen to just forget girls and high school society in general, and enjoy the Zen-like detachment that comes from being an intentional loser.

Then he meets Mia Stone, and all the repressed hormones come flooding back. Mia, his
...more
Jon-michael
Dec 15, 2008 rated it really liked it
The first time I met Mia we ended up in a hotel room by ourselves.

Albert Kim is many things, but popular isn't one of them. He's more likely to be friends with the sixth graders down the street than his own classmates of either sex. More at home playing video games than interacting with real people. But the summer he gets his first job--as a janitor at a nearby inn--he begins to mature--slightly at least. One of his coworkers is Mia, a classmate who is popular and beautiful and utterly
...more
Becky
Jan 27, 2009 rated it really liked it

The first time I met Mia we ended up in a hotel room by ourselves.

Albert Kim is many things, but popular isn't one of them. He's more likely to be friends with the sixth graders down the street than his own classmates of either sex. More at home playing video games than interacting with real people. But the summer he gets his first job--as a janitor at a nearby inn--he begins to mature--slightly at least. One of his coworkers is Mia, a classmate who is popular and beautiful and utterly
...more
Mary
As I read this book, I kept trying to remember why I ordered it. I think it was because there's a tie-in to Romeo and Juliet - although it's more a result of a few mentions by the narrator, Albert Kim, than any actual parallels in the story itself. In fact, Albert compares his own life and first love to Shakespeare's couple. Albert Kim is a Korean-American, high achieving, sousaphone-playing high school boy with no social life whatsoever except playing with a group of 6th grade neighborhood boys ...more
Alex
Jul 21, 2009 rated it really liked it
First off, I love that Davids Asian- Korean to be exact. Being Asian also, I can relate. He jokes about his parents and a lot of his nerdiness he blames on being Asian. He reminds me of Patti in Good Enough by Paula Yoo. Theyre both Korean, hilarious, and with parents who care mostly about grades.

Albert is one crazy character. At the beginning, he was really awkward- so awkward Id physically wince when he opened his mouth to speak. But when he was with Mia, he became really cute and sweet and
...more
Wendy
Sep 06, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: young-adult
I don't really bother summarizing plots in reviews, because a) others have already done so and b) I tend to read reviews AFTER I read the book, so I'm looking for opinions and insights rather than trying to decide whether or not to read a book. I don't even mind if the reviewer barely mentions the book, as long as I see how the book connects to whatever they're ranting about. So I write reviews for those like me.

This was one of a few YA books I've read recently that were written in the 21st
...more
Teen
First off - I loved this narrator. Sure, he was so immature that he made you cringe much of the time. Just like you'll yell "Don't go in there!" to a girl in a horror movie you'll want to sew up Albert's tongue half the time: making him unable to do or say one of the hundreds of things he does or says throughout the book. I think that's what I loved so much about this book - it was such a spot on representation of how dumb and self centered some boys and girls can be at (ahem) some ages.

The
...more
Shaya
Mar 14, 2009 rated it liked it
Recommended to Shaya by: Robert
Stop Me If You Heard This One Before is the tale of Albert Kim who starts off high school deciding he's going to be an intentional loser. The summer before his junior year he takes a job at an inn and Mia, who is very popular and part of the "perfect couple", is his coworker. In the beginning Albert is a jerk which is a little hard to read through but then he figures out how to be nice and treat her well and by the end of the summer they are together. (She broke up with her boyfriend, Ryan) But ...more
Patricia
Jan 05, 2009 rated it really liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Doug Sacks
Aug 06, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: ya-titles
Humorous and entirely believable. You root for Albert all the way, even in his lowest moments. Yes, boys do act this way... So vulnerable and so strong at the same time, both Mia and Albert are very human characters. I will say that the book is both sarcastic and serious and while I liked a lot of the humor, this direction often led to bland stereotypical secondary characters. Yoo's observations on high school dynamics are spot on and his asides about Albert's Korean parents were funny. Some may ...more
Alex
Mar 23, 2009 rated it liked it
Shelves: coming-of-age
This has been moved back and forth on my to read pile, so when I finally started, I was very pleasantly surprised by this touching story of misfit Albert. Albert has figured out high school, if he just acts like he is not there then no one will bother him, and this works well for two years, until he has a summer job with the most beautiful girl in the school. As the summer wears on, they fall for each other, but since Albert has withdrawn so far into himself, he has no idea how toreact when they ...more
Alana Mcconnell
Feb 22, 2014 rated it really liked it
This book is told in the perspective of a teenage Korean boy called Albert, who is an intentional loser. He meets Mia, a popular pretty and way out of his league girl at work over the summer. A relationship forms, and by the time school starts, they are officially "something". But then Mia's ex boyfriend Ryan gets cancer, and the whole town rallies up to support him, including Mia. Albert feels like Ryan is trying to steal Mia away from him, but since Ryan has cancer, Albert can't exactly say ...more
Sofia
Aug 29, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: summer-challenge
Albert is set. Over the summer, he falls in love with his incredibly hot coworker, Mia, and lo and behold: even though hes a loser who still plays with sixth graders, she likes him back! This is possibly the best thing to ever befall poor Albert, whos had a difficult time fitting in at Bern High. His only problem now is Mias ex-boyfriend, who is not only extremely scary, but extremely popular. Oh, and he has cancer. And he wants Mia back. And Albert keeping her from taking care of him in his ...more
Sharon
Feb 09, 2009 rated it really liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Cecilia
May 05, 2009 rated it liked it
Shelves: blue-covers
I could definitely picture Albert as an awkward boy trying to fit in to impress the girl. I appreciated his attempts at humor and winced as they fell flat with his audience. He tried hard to be the patient and understanding boyfriend as Mia nursed Ryan to health, and I wanted to knock some sense into Mia as she continually chose Ryan over Albert without fully realizing how it was damaging her relationship with Albert.

I had expecting this to be a little funnier, and I am sad that it failed in
...more
KRISTI  ♫ ♪
Apr 13, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: my-favorie-books
11 CHAPTERS IN: A hilarious book. Although it goes a little slow in the beginning and it's kinda boring, it gets A LOT better. It's so funny and I love how it's on the guy's point of view because not many romance books are on the guy's point of view. It's funny because you can read what the guys think of girls and all their thoughts.
DONE WITH BOOK: Wow. INCREDIBLE. A very well-written book. I have to admit, it is a little fast but it's really really funny. I like how it's on a guy's point of
...more
Hannah Goodman
Oct 18, 2010 rated it really liked it
I just love David Yoo's characters. They always make me laugh. Albert Kim's struggle to fit in is hilarious and cringe-worthy. You see the tornado coming and you can't get out of the way so you just stand and watch the inevitable. I also like that the characters aren't stereotypesparticularly the popular girl that Albert has a crush on and then winds up in a relationship with.

My only criticism is that I found the vagueness of the time period kind of distracting and the whole thing with the
...more
Bryan
Jan 23, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: advisory-reading
I thought this book was amazing. First off, this book is written by an Asian.. How amazing is that!? Also, the character is Asian, and that's also brilliant. The fact that the character is Asian, is that I can connect to the story better, because I have experienced what he had experienced. Or at least most of his experiences. This book has a great plot, and is a good read. It's about an Asian's kid's love life, and how it works out. Themes like, hatred, misunderstanding, and love are all present ...more
Ana
Feb 10, 2015 rated it really liked it
This novel had me hooked from the first page, his Romeo and Juliet analogy was the sincere perspective on it, not the type that's romanticized or sugar-coated. Which I may mention, it was definitely not. His unconscious yearning to belong in a crowd very abstract to him was honest, and his emotions were real. Overall, an interesting and intriguing novel in which Yoo successfully captures what its like to be a teenager, or even more-so an outsider, and crafts his pages with humour and an ...more
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David Yoo's first collection of essays, The Choke Artist: Confessions of a Chronic Underachiever (Grand Central) is out June 19, 2012. He is a graduate from Skidmore College with an MA from the University of Colorado-Boulder. His first novel, Girls For Breakfast (Delacorte) was a Booksense Pick, an NYPL Books For the Teen Age selection, and a Reading Rants Top Ten Books for Teens choice. He lives ...more

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