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The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences

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4.17  ·  Rating details ·  42 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
This volume challenges the current consensus in New Testament scholarship that each of the Gospels was written for a specific church or group of churches. These essays argue, from a wide range of evidence, that the Gospels were intended for general circulation throughout all the early churches and, hence, were written for all Christians.

Loveday Alexander, Stephen C. Barton
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Paperback, 226 pages
Published November 13th 1997 by Eerdmans (first published 1997)
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Zachary
Nov 01, 2017 rated it really liked it
At the time of its publication, this book represented a highly "unorthodox" thesis in Gospel studies: that the Gospels were written not just for a particular, geographically limited community, but for Christians and perhaps even non-Christians over a wide geographic spread. For most readers of the gospels this may seem an obvious or irrelevant point, but for most Gospel scholarship in the 20th century, it was all but obvious, and how scholars conceived of the audiences of the gospels often deepl ...more
Jeff Miller
Apr 19, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Super interesting collection of essays from different authors. At the time of release it took on the prevailing scholarly thesis that the Gospels were written specifically for the communities the authors were in.

The first essay from Richard Bauckham really takes on this thesis and provides a lot of evidence against this idea. But what makes these essays so interning is how everything is framed and helps you think about the audiences of the Gospels and the communications between the early Christi
...more
Sonny
Aug 13, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: biblical-history
A major assumption of Gospel scholarship over the last half-century is the idea that each Gospel was written for a specific Christian audience, either a church or group of churches, and especially for the “communities” in which the evangelists resided. Gospel study therefore has focused on the distinguishing characteristics of these unmentioned communities to which each of the Gospels was supposedly addressed, with the assumption that these audiences are key to understanding the Gospels. Richard ...more
Adam
Nov 01, 2012 rated it it was amazing
While taking a biblical studies course this odd idea was quite often assumed: each gospel was written to a select and isolated community who had their own struggles and conflicts which these gospels dealt with through the teachings and actions of Jesus. The absurdity (at least to me) that this remained most unchallenged and assumed left me looking for answers. This is the book I was directed to. It is both thorough and thought provoking. The thesis that John knew Mark is worth the price of admis ...more
Steven Koster
Feb 29, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Another excellent Bauckham book, bringing some sanity to the world of early church history and New Testament development. The premise of this one seems obvious and simple--the gospels were written with the intention of being widely read. But that upsets decades of recent biblical studies and notions of isolated disparate communities transmitting oral stories for decades and centuries. If taken seriously, this should be an earthquake in the field.
Sarah
Jan 06, 2016 rated it really liked it
I read the Introduction, Bauckham's piece "John for Readers of Mark" and Francis Watson's piece "Toward a Literal Reading of the Gospels." To be honest, I had to read "John.." About three times before I could begin to actually synthesize the information. This is too advanced for where I currently am, but Bill is working on a project that I said I would help with so I'm forging ahead.
Tommi Karjalainen
Feb 25, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Some articles were not so clear. The overall argument is persuasive.
Rob Dalrymple
May 13, 2012 rated it really liked it
Excellent
Dancingfoolvb
Oct 13, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Addresses the perspective that the Gospels were written only for specific groups, rather than for general consumption. But could have had more about circulation and transmission of texts.
Spencer
Great book that encounters the community thesis and it's variants. Bauckham is at times too broad, but overall his argument is sound.
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Richard Bauckham (PhD, University of Cambridge) is senior scholar at Ridley Hall, Cambridge University, in Cambridge, England, where he teaches for the Cambridge Federation of Theological Colleges. He is also a visiting professor at St. Mellitus College, London, and emeritus professor of New Testament at the University of St. Andrews. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and the author of numerou ...more
More about Richard Bauckham