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The Art of Execution: How the world's best investors get it wrong and still make millions
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The Art of Execution: How the world's best investors get it wrong and still make millions

really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  220 ratings  ·  15 reviews
Over seven years, 45 of the world's top investors were given between $25 and $150m to invest by fund manager Lee Freeman-Shor. His instructions were simple. There was only one rule. They could only invest in their ten best ideas to make money.
It seemed like a foolproof plan to make a lot of money. What could possibly go wrong? These were some of the greatest minds at work
...more
Kindle Edition, 208 pages
Published September 14th 2015 by Harriman House
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really liked it 4.00  · 
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 ·  220 ratings  ·  15 reviews


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Owen Jones
May 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: investing
Lee Freeman-Shor is a fund-of-funds manager at Old Mutual Global Investors, one of the many fund partners available on our fund supermarket. His book isn’t really about investing, instead it’s more of an exploration of human behaviour under different types of stress, and this is what makes the book fascinating.
Freeman-Shor splits his investors into different ‘tribes’ to describe their behaviour. He finds that the same investors make the same mistakes, or do the right things, time and time again.
...more
Pradip Caulagi
Sep 17, 2018 rated it liked it
This was one of the aha moments for me, since I heard it for the first time -

"
And crowds are often surprisingly wise - the market can be right even when everyone who makes it up is individually wrong.

In 1987 Jack Treynor presented 56 of his students with a jar full of jelly beans and asked them a simple question. How many jelly beans were in the jar? There were 850, but not one student got it right - hardly surprising.

What is more surprising is that despite the guessed varying massively from one
...more
Subash
Jan 09, 2018 rated it it was ok
Yet another investment book with tons of quotes from investment biggies and human psychology. Easily avoidable.
InvestingByTheBooks.com
Aug 20, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I’m a terrible snob when it comes to investment literature. Books written for private investors rarely interest me. This is different. This might be the most important book on investments that a private investor can read – if he can gather the discipline to follow the advice. It might actually save quite a few professional portfolio managers’ bacon as well.

Lee Freeman-Shor is the PM of Old Mutual’s Best Ideas Fund. The fund’s strategy is to select the 45 best investors they can find and let them
...more
Wulan Suci Maria
Oct 20, 2018 rated it it was amazing
A very helpful and practical book for someone who is super blind in this sector (me). I enjoyed reading the book and had many aha moments while reading the book. I think it is because it doesn’t discuss hard technical formula, but rather the psychological side of pro investors when they face losing and winning situation.

The author classifies many of ‘pro’ investor into 5 types, tells the differentiation response for each types, and advices which one is the best response.

Simple mantra that actua
...more
Alberto
May 29, 2017 rated it really liked it
More useful for investing than for trading, as the data becomes handy with long term (3+ years) strategies.

I liked the fact that the overarching thesis is backed up by data at every major point, the author took analyzed over one thousand trades and ran the numbers on what made them successful: it turns out that data supports the old adage "cut your losses, let your profits run".

There's a section at the beginning where many of the cognitive biases explored by Kahneman and Tversky are contextualis
...more
Catherine Bertram
May 12, 2018 rated it really liked it
Helps in understanding heuristics

Good points only slight niggle is it could be more concise = however great summary at the end. A straightforward read easy to understand key points.
Mark A.
Feb 16, 2019 rated it really liked it
Good Read

Found the ideas pretty simple and that gives me confidence in their soundness. If Only LTCM could have explained their investment rules this succinctly.
Rei
Oct 20, 2018 rated it did not like it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Luis Fernando
May 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Simple and to the point. It engages the reader with his real life examples, which helps a lot to understand the why and how you need to become a connoisseur about your investments and trading habits.
Akshay
Feb 15, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A must read for investors. Read it while young otherwise u would regret reading it later in life. It's a great book which tells us that it's the execution of an investment idea that matters in the end. A wonderful book
Vitalijus Sostak
Feb 06, 2017 rated it really liked it
It's a solid book with lots of trivial-sounding, but important takeaways, hence 4-star rating.
For me personally, it did not add anything of value, I guess any committed investor discovers these "truths" sooner or later in his/her career and thus this book aims to aid non-professionals or fresh investors.
Ian Cassel
Jan 19, 2017 rated it really liked it
A very simple easy read that you can finish in a day or two. I think the opening teaser of the book is a great teaser to why it's a good book. "Over seven years, 45 of the world's top investors were given between $25m and $150m to invest by fund manager Lee Freeman-Shor. His instructions were simple. There was only one rule. They could only invest in their ten best ideas to make money.It seemed like a foolproof plan to make a lot of money. What could possibly go wrong? These were some of the gre ...more
Tomas Krakauskas
Aug 08, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Great book, very useful in practice! A must read for every active investor, financial advisor or fund manager
Max Rose
Dec 26, 2015 rated it really liked it
Simplicity is the utmost sophistication.
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