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Fragments of a Faith Forgotten

4.31  ·  Rating details ·  52 ratings  ·  6 reviews
This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern ...more
Paperback, 692 pages
Published January 1st 1992 by Kessinger Publishing (first published 1900)
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Erik Graff
Mar 11, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: any interested in early church history
Recommended to Erik by: no one
Shelves: religion
G.R.S. Mead was an officer in the early Theosophist Society, a member of its inner circle. This dubious association notwithstanding, he actually produced a number of significant books related to the early Christian Church and its religious environment.

Given the date of composition, Fragments displays considerable erudition, mastery of the materials available at the time and a broad canvas representing what might loosely be termed "early gnosticism." Mead writes fluidly and clearly. His text is r
...more
Alexandru
A very good and interesting study. It is useful not just for the scholars, but also for those seeking the truth :)
A
Jan 14, 2008 marked it as to-read
Recommends it for: anyone wanting to learn the roots of gnosticism
Finally back to reading this one. Mead is discussing the various early Christian Gnostic cults as filtered through the orthodox theologians of the era (Irenaenus, Justin Martyr, etc.). A lot is reiteration of what I already know, although I did learn the term "Ophite," which means serpent-worshiper. I'm going to have to reread the sections on pre-Christian Gnosticism since I seem to have forgotten most of it already.

Note:
You can read this book online at http://www.gnosis.org/library/grs-mea...
...more
Walter Five
May 10, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
" Mr. Mead was Mdm. Blavatsky's Personal Secretary, and Editor of the London Theosophical Society's ''Lucifer'' magazine in the 1880's, from which much of the material in this work originated. An expert of his day in Gnosticism, this book is a marvelous overview of the breadth and depth of Gnostic materials and historic understanding of the subject prior to the discoveries of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Codex. ...more
Rick Wilmot
Feb 07, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A book for anybody interested in the symbolism of religion and what was left out of the KJV of the Bible. It's as well to bear in mind that this was published in 1904 and since then many discoveries have been made including the Dead Sea Scrolls. ...more
Virginia Nichols
1st pub 1906. On my to buy list. Full of valuable facts.
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George Robert Stowe Mead, who always published under the initialism G.R.S. Mead, was a historian, writer, editor, translator, and an influential member of the Theosophical Society, as well as founder of the Quest Society. His scholarly works dealt mainly with the Hermetic and Gnostic religions of Late Antiquity, and were exhaustive for the time period.

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