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Shades of Justice: Seven Nova Scotia Murder Cases

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As dawn broke on a summer morning in 1819, pistol shots echoed across a field on the outskirts of Halifax. Merchant William Bowie, who issued the challenge to this duel, lay dead. Richard John Uniacke Jr., the son of Nova Scotia’s attorney general, stood trial for his murder but escaped the noose – and ended his career as a Supreme Court judge. The Uniacke-Bowie duel is on ...more
Paperback, 148 pages
Published December 1st 1988 by Nimbus Publishing Ltd ,Canada
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I’m drawn to fascinating people and events that have been overlooked or forgotten – hidden gems tucked away in the attics of history, stories waiting to be told. Ideas and inspiration can come from a footnote in a book, a museum exhibit or a reference in the news. I discovered the subject of my latest book, Empire of Deception – Leo Koretz and his amazing oil swindle in 1920s Chicago – while doing research ...more