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Tim Ginger

3.48  ·  Rating details ·  247 ratings  ·  34 reviews
The prize-winning British cartoonist Julian Hanshaw makes his American debut with the rich and meditative story of Tim Ginger. Once a government test pilot, now a widow, Tim enjoys a quiet retirement in New Mexico... until a conspiracy theorist starts asking uncomfortable questions, and the haunting reappearance of an old friend provokes some hard choices about when to let ...more
Paperback, 160 pages
Published August 11th 2015 by Top Shelf Productions
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Average rating 3.48  · 
Rating details
 ·  247 ratings  ·  34 reviews


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Sam Quixote
May 12, 2016 rated it did not like it
Hey guys, did you know that some of us don’t have or want kids and that’s ok? I had no idea anything quite so obvious needed to be stated but see how quickly I did that, Julian Hanshaw? Didn’t need a 150 page book to draw that shit out!

Tim Ginger is a comic in dire need of something - anything - happening in it. Our dull protagonist is a retired military test pilot who might’ve seen some extra-terrestrial stuff during one flight but now lives alone - his wife’s dead and they never had kids - in
...more
Jan Philipzig
Pleasant. But also a little boring. Mostly pleasant, though. That's all, folks.
David Schaafsma
Nov 03, 2015 rated it it was amazing
This is a lovely graphic novel with a sweet and somewhat predictable ending that nevertheless is complex and surprising and subtle in many ways throughout. Tim Ginger, former government test pilot, now a widow, is retired and living in a trailer in New Mexico near where she died and he lost his sight in a plane accident. He has written about something he thought he saw, something dark about the government, so he gets invited to conspiracy/ufo conventions to speak. He also plays cricket since he ...more
Dov Zeller
Dec 08, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: graphics-comics
It's possible this book starts out with a quote by Dolly Parton. Yep, I'm pretty sure it does. "I never really had the desire to have children. My husband didn't want them either, so it worked out well."

Yep. This is one strange book. Whatever you're expecting, it's likely to quietly evade your expectations.

(There are likely spoilers in this review, FYI).

"Tim Ginger" is partly a meditation on the topic of adults who choose not to have children (or who for some other reason don't have children.)
...more
Derek Royal
Nov 02, 2015 rated it it was amazing
A very moving story, and one of the strongest I've read all year. The tone is measured and contemplative. Hanshaw is adept at drawing out his story in narratively strategic ways, and one of the ways he handles this is through panel perspective. The many images he presents are close-ups on objects within the setting, many of which reveal undertone or mood. So both in craft and in story, Hanshaw knows how to present a narrative.
Stewart Tame
Jun 08, 2016 rated it really liked it
Impressive work! I'd not heard of Julian Hanshaw before, but this looked intriguing. It's pretty much a character study of Mr. Ginger, a former test pilot, cricket enthusiast, and widower living in a trailer in the New Mexico desert. There's mybe a touch of magic realism to the story, which involves conspiracy theorists, UFOs, a former love interest, comics, and an eyepatch. That sounds more lively and exciting than it's meant to. This is not an action/adventure yarn, but a character study. Ging ...more
Marc
Wistful and melancholic. A triumph of cricket over conspiracy theory. If it ever gets made into a film, Tommy Lee Jones should play the lead role.
Marcus
Sep 01, 2015 rated it really liked it
Ostensibly this comic is about a former test pilot who thinks he saw something on one of his flights and who lost his wife to an early death. However it is really a book that has a deep and profound theme applicable to almost every adult in the western world over the age of thirty. We must let go of the past to allow progress to a happier future. We don't forget the past and the people and places we knew, but they cease to act as a chain tethering us to something we can never return to.

In betwee
...more
The Laughing Man
Feb 23, 2016 rated it really liked it
It kind of felt like reading my own story in a different context, I feel what he feels deep inside. Simple yet moving story.
Josh
Apr 08, 2016 rated it did not like it
I'm just relieved it's over; This was quite boring.
Blue
Oct 21, 2018 rated it really liked it
Tim Ginger by Julian Hanshaw is a slow, contemplative novel about grief and existence. Hanshaw's drawings capture moments and quiet scenes effectively. The color scheme is fantastic. Though the story is a bit confusing at times, with flashbacks and dream sequences adding to the confusion, the brilliant surreal dream and hallucination sequences are not to be missed. In the end, I thought the romance was a bit thin, meaning, that Anna could finally jolt Tim out of his grief-stricken stupor was not ...more
P.
Aug 01, 2018 rated it it was ok
I've come to realize Top Shelf publications have a certain flavor. This is a very Top Shelf book! A story that I could tell comes from one mind, one vision, with art that has its own individual tone, a meditation on alienation and isolation through a particular lens - in this case, a middle-aged(?) man who was a test pilot and had a strange experience on the day his wife died and hasn't really recovered from it, but survives alone in a trailer the North American desert and only gets joy from pla ...more
Shelby Ann
Apr 26, 2018 rated it it was ok
A strange story line that makes you consider what carrying on the family tree really means. A journey through the eyes of a man who lost his wife and is conflicted with how he is to live the remainder of his life. An eyeopening story to other point of views of what having kids really entitles.
Shannon
Sep 10, 2018 rated it liked it
Odd and lonely, Tim Ginger contemplates life in the desert of New Mexico. In the dour spirit of Chris Ware, whose work I immensely enjoy, Tim Ginger falls somewhat flat. I love the style and pacing of this graphic novel but wished to be more emotionally moved by the plot.
Shihab Labib
Oct 21, 2017 rated it did not like it
Terribly boring and non-engaging
Simon Sweetman
Nov 29, 2017 rated it really liked it
A very clever, unique story - brilliantly told through the images and text, well spaced, paced, the best graphic novel I've encountered in a wee while...
Abigail Monhollen
May 04, 2018 rated it liked it
Super interesting. Something about Tim's character development is endearing, and I'm so happy with how it ended. I also loved the illustrations and the color choice.
Debbie
Oct 15, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This is extremely weird and I loved it!
Tom Gaetjens
Oct 23, 2019 rated it it was ok
Bleak and somewhat indecipherable, reaches for a deeper meaning that just barely eludes its grasp.
Ollie
Mar 22, 2016 rated it liked it
Do you know why it’s probably a good idea for anyone interested in comics to stay away from the mainstream DC/Marvel stuff? Because not in a million years would you read a book like Tim Ginger if you did.

The concept of Tim Ginger is both unique, extravagant, and at the same time very simple. It deals with a topic that most of don’t think about which is parenthood, and more specifically what it’s like for people who never wanted to be parents (more so than the irritating justification it require
...more
The_Mad_Swede
May 08, 2020 rated it liked it
Shelves: library, comics, 2020
I picked this up on the spur of the moment at library and I am not quite sure why.

It is a weird meditative graphic novel, centred on eponymous ex government test pilot Tim Ginger, who now lives alone in the New Mexico desert. He has written one book on his experiences, which is the talk of conspiracy theorists, and is writing another ... about cricket (a passion he has picked up). And when he makes an appearance at a convention he runs into an old acquaintance from his past, a woman who has made
...more
John  Mihelic
Apr 18, 2016 rated it it was amazing
I don’t know how to put this in a way that doesn’t seem like a back-hand compliment, so I’m just going to say that I really liked this book. What made it stand out is the story about love and mystery and fighter jets and loss. The art sort of takes a back seat until the very end, which is what makes it feel back-handed. “Good job, Mr. Graphic Novelist, That art didn’t really stand out. “

But the story fits the genre and is necessary for the cool moment at the end whicih is the payoff for the rest
...more
Emilia P
Aug 22, 2016 rated it liked it
Shelves: comic-books
So uhhh yeah, some people don't want kids. You could have written a comic book about that (the book within this book idea was interesting but way too transparent)....or you could have written the What Did Tim Ginger Really See Out There, book. But not having quite enough to say about either one they ended up as one lumped together, lovingly drawn, but ultimately listless little slip of a book. Bro, put a little oomph into it! One of those that would have benefited from being far bolder.
Andy
Jul 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: graphic-novels, 2015
Reading this once more might just bump it to 5 stars. It's a bit difficult to describe the book, but reading the description on Goodreads tells you enough to decide whether or not you want to read it, yet barely scratches the surface of its depth. It affected me on a personal level, which it probably won't do with everyone. I highly recommend it and will revisit it in a few weeks or months.
Jessica Haider
Dec 29, 2015 rated it really liked it
Tim Ginger is a graphic novel about a former test pilot, who is now a widower hitting the book circuit to promote his book.

The story isn't straightforward and requires some thought to peel away the layers. It is a fairly quick read, clocking in at under 200 pages.
Rachel
Jul 09, 2016 rated it it was ok
Shelves: graphic-books
I liked it. But couldn't tell many of the characters apart, even men from women--it required an eye patch or neck brace to be sure. Same with time; it went back and forth. There's a good story there, but it's not readily accessible.
Molly
Aug 29, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2015, graphic-novel
Quirky, endearing, and unusual. I was pleasantly surprised.
Megan
Nov 30, 2015 rated it it was ok
Storyline mostly flopped. Artwork was alright.
Christopher
Feb 02, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Beautifully illustrated and perhaps even more beautifully executed in terms of its story.
Sonic
Feb 24, 2016 rated it liked it

It seems perhaps that there was a mild tension between the dull parts of the story (most of it) and the hints of a potentially interesting aspect to the story.

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