Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “La grande désillusion” as Want to Read:
La grande désillusion
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

La grande désillusion

3.84  ·  Rating details ·  5,571 Ratings  ·  270 Reviews
Stiglitz affirme dans cet ouvrage que le FMI fait passer l’intérêt de son « principal actionnaire », les États-Unis, avant ceux des nations les moins favorisées qu’il a pourtant pour objectif de servir.

En prenant comme exemple la crise asiatique et la transition russe, Stiglitz soutient que les politiques préconisées par le FMI ont souvent aggravé les problèmes dont il ava
...more
Mass Market Paperback, 407 pages
Published September 1st 2003 by Livre de Poche (first published 2002)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about La grande désillusion, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about La grande désillusion

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Whitaker
Sep 26, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Update, 4 January 2012

I just stumbled across this Open Letter to Joseph Stiglitz by Kenneth Rogoff writing as Economic Counsellor and Director of Research, International Monetary Fund. Rogoff is also the author and researcher of the excellent This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly , to which I gave five stars.

However one swings on this debate, Rogoff's lively rejoinder to this book is, I think, essential reading. If nothing else, it's a good reminder to me to check my own c
...more
beggs
Jul 04, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in understanding the backlash against globalization
I picked up Joseph Stiglitz book in the same purchase I got Naomi Klien’s No Logo and Peter Singer's One World. Obviously there is an interest in globalization in that recipe. I’ve been reading The Economist ([http://www.economist.com]) for some years and been mildly informed on globalization and the backlash against it evident in the protests against the IMF, World Bank, G7/G8, WTO and other multinational bodies associated with it. I didn’t really develop an interest in globalization until I re ...more
Noah
Jul 11, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: politics
A critique of the way that globalization had proceeded up to 2002, focusing largely on the East Asia Crisis and Russian Shock Therapy. Stiglitz argues that the policies enforced by the international financial institutions (the IMF takes the brunt of his criticisms) are politically, economically, and morally problematic. In their adherence to budget austerity and overemphasis on inflation, they eliminate the social safety nets that make radical economic/social reforms sustainable in the long term ...more
Dan
Jan 01, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2009
so... last year i decided i was gonna get my feet wet in the world of economics - and specifically development economics. i read some stuff by theory types i was interested in anyway (mike davis, david harvey), i read the shock doctrine, i read the end of poverty and i looked to paul krugman (and others) as the american financial system took a nosedive into the shitter.

globalization and its discontents is the best of the bunch so far. it's *really* informative - not to mention level-headed, clea
...more
Prithvi Shams
Sep 07, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A cogent critique of IMF's unhealthy obsession with pushing down inflation at any expense to debtor countries and the hypocrisy of developed countries in preaching free market fundamentalism to the developing world while keeping their own doors closed. The author emphasizes on initiating and ensuring democratic discoursing in international institutions, calling for an end to behind-the-doors decision-making that has been the norm so far. The case is driven home by delineation of the economic cri ...more
Adam
Jan 20, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very good, and a must read for anyone interested in globalization from the point of view of the globalizers (albeit a dissenting one), though obviously one should read books from the point of view of the "common folk" before this. Unfortunately, this book is kind of a hit piece on the IMF (which is where it shines, Stiglitz is hardly a socialist so his critiques are more effective), but Stiglitz worked for the semi-rival World Bank, and he constantly is excusing the World Bank's misdeeds and con ...more
Röhan
Sep 03, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: best-of-2015
Overall, the successful countries have pursued a comprehensive approach to development. Thirty years ago, analysts of the left and right often seemed to agree that the improvement in the efficiency of resource allocation and the increase of supply of capital were at the heart of development. They differed only as to whether those changes should be obtained through government led planning or unfettered markets. In the end, neither worked. Development encompasses not just resources and capital but ...more
Lucía Vijil Saybe
Lo fundamentalistas de la economía dirán que la expansión del capital, la privatización y la liberalización del mercado mundial son las respuestas a los desequilibrios del mercado (sin intervención del estado). La globalización no es mala, porque es necesario el avance en políticas de cambios sustentables en una sociedad, Stiglitz el economista más humanista de las dos últimas década, clarificando con ejemplos que las crisis actuales y el empobrecimiento en crecimiento es gracias a los guardiane ...more
Adriaan Jansen
Stiglitz probably didn't make many friends inside the International Monetary Fund (IMF) when this book was published in 2002: ''Globalization and its discontents'' at times seems like a long criticism of the IMF. No, let me rephrase that: This book is actually a character assassination of the IMF and the policies it implemented during the 1980s and 90s.

This book focuses on 2 episodes in the 1990's: the East Asia crisis of 1997-1998 and the transition from communism to market economy in Russia af
...more
Nicole Means
May 31, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Interestingly, I began reading this book late one night when I couldn't sleep, but instead of becoming drowsy, I was struck with insomnia due to the issues brought up in this book. There are so many injustices in this world, and, sadly, organizations that are set up to help others often fail miserably. "Globalization and Its Discontents" is definitely a biased read, but it is quite thought-provoking. However, globalization is not a new phenomenon, as it has been around since ancient times. The i ...more
Phillip
Generally a good description of the way in which IMF and US Treasury policies have played out in the developing world from the 1980s to 2002. Broadly speaking, these institutions have done their best to serve US and Western financial interests, rather than seeking a benevolent and mutually beneficial globalization, despite the IMF's mandate to promote international economic stability and growth. Of course, one of the big problems with these policies is that they don't actually serve the interest ...more
Tim
Nov 09, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I'm a dope when it comes to economics, but my impression is that this book has been hugely influential among the anti-corporate globalization crowd. It came out shortly after the Seattle WTO protests and soon popped up on the bookshelves many of my development-minded friends.

It's easy to see why: Stiglitz is about as prestigious a development economist as you are likely to find--Nobel Prize winner, former chief economist at the World Bank, by some metrics the most cited economist working today.
...more
gaby
Jul 11, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Stiglitz writes in a no-nonsense, straightforward fashion. His prose is almost surprisingly facile, for an academic of his stature. It totally works. It's a great and easy read.

As a non-economist, I easily got his points:

1) Globalization is not working for the developing world, because the international economic institutions that were created to ensure global stability in the early 20th century (the World Bank & IMF) have been overtaken by ideological slaves to the ideal of the free market,
...more
Mark Lawry
Jun 11, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to me by someone who I had believed was against globalization. Yes, I’m a huge advocate of globalization so in the interest of reading those who I don’t agree with I read it. It turns out Stiglitz is very much not anti-globalization but wrote the book explaining why some might be. He starts out explaining that he believes globalization is a very powerful tool to improve our lives, that privatization, and market liberalization are very powerful tools. Then spends much of the rest of t ...more
Avto Sofromadze
Stiglitz bases his argument on the themes that his decades of theoretical work have emphasized: namely, what happens when people lack the key information that bears on the decisions they have to make, or when markets for important kinds of transactions are inadequate or don't exist, or when other institutions that standard economic thinking takes for granted are absent or flawed. Stiglitz stresses the point: "Recent advances in economic theory" (in part referring to his own work) "have shown tha ...more
Brian Moriarty
Good read. The IMF, World Bank & WTO set the rules of the game in a way that serves the special interests of the advanced countries rather than those of the developing world. Big bailouts are the safety net to ensure the western money lenders get their money back when things collapse. Also strong regulation basically doesn't exist. This was written in 2002 and still the same problems he mentions exist...

I feel no matter what Stiglitz(and others)says in their books and interviews it has no ef
...more
Luís Gouveia
Apr 17, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: diversos
Maldita globalização que é resultado de um processo de enxugamento do território e das comunidades, logo do trabalho e das pessoas.

O resultado? um nevoeiro de capital que circula pelo mundo, corroendo valor e saltando para o próximo local, sempre deixando menos do que o que ofereceu.

Em particular, a sustentabilidade nas suas três dimensões, sai afetada e torna mais desigual os processos económico, ambiental e social - criando muitas vezes desiquilíbrios que resultam do enfraquecimento dos Estado
...more
Paula
Jan 22, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is my second reading of this book. The first time through was in 2008. I was trying to understand why the world economy seemed to be collapsing. This book helped me to understand not only why it happened, but who made it happen, and what it would take to fix things. Years later we are still waiting for that fix. The powers that be (particularly the IMF and WTO) continue to give lip service to the issues that Stiglitz brought up, but have done little to change them. I have now read several b ...more
Stephen Angelo
first hand account of some a short comings of globalization, specifically related to Stiglitz time the World Bank and IMF. Essentially he accuses these organizations of coercing developing nations to abide by strict "market fundamentalism" which involves economic theories that look good in paper and in economic textbooks, but fail to take into account unique characteristics of countries, their governments, culture and demographics. Stiglitz does seem arrogant at times, he too easily points out s ...more
Mehmet
Nov 30, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I suppose that this book contains essential criticism of globalization after the 1980s. Nonetheless, it has a wrong name for the contents of the book. The book actually criticized the neoliberalism, unrestricted privatization and the IMF since they led to disorganization and inequality in the developing countries. The book was written before the crash of 2008 and the financial crisis proved that he was right to the discontents of the global financial system.

You should take this book examine the
...more
Zachariah
I liked this book but from the title I expected something different. I thought it was going to be an exploration of globalization and how it has adversely impacted some countries more than others. Including things like cultural homogenization, environmental damages, urbanization, human trafficking, etc. Instead I got a examination of the IMF, the World Bank, and the WTO and their role in the inequities of globalization, from a very broad and macroeconomic perspective. While this isn't a bad thin ...more
Jet
Sep 01, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fine, Stiglitz writes well on a subject that is hot with the developing world, and he is a writer after my own heart, especially as he argues on how the free market and the wonderful hypocrisy of IMF and WTO (And by that stroke, the developed economies) cripple the southern hemisphere. But honestly, how many books can he write with the same contents, contexts and examples? The argument is good, I am periodically bored with his historical narrative, and all in all, if you have to read a Stiglitz ...more
Andrew
Joseph Stiglitz is the sort of thinker who can appeal to pretty much everyone on the political spectrum, conservative, liberal, and leftist. While those on the right will probably have a problem with his disapproval of laissez-faire economics, and those (like myself) on the left will take issue with some of his more market-oriented solutions, he is above all else, a sane, rational commentator. His thesis is quite simple: before putting forth any platform, we need to examine the economic disaster ...more
Diego
Mar 07, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Resume los grandes problemas que la globalización ha traído para los países en desarrollo, principalmente al liberalizar prematuramente sus mercados de capitales y perseguir de forma dogmática el libre mercado, ilustra como las políticas impulsadas por el consenso de Washington ( principalmente el FMI ) han causado mas malestar que mejoría en los países en desarrollo, particularmente ilustra los casos de la crisis asiática de 1997, la rusa de 1998 y las diversas crisis de lationoamérica en la mi ...more
Христо Блажев
Джоузеф Стиглиц громи МВФ в “Глобализацията и недоволните от нея”
http://www.knigolandia.info/2010/07/b...

По случай успешната ми защита на дипломна работа днес най-сетне се наканвам да пиша и за другата книга на Джоузеф Стиглиц, след като миналата седмица ревюирах “Свободно падане”.

“Глобализацията и недоволните от нея” може да се дефинира с едно изречение – “Какво не е наред с МВФ?”. Стиглиц убедително и напоително критикува почти всички действия на Фонда, обвинявайки ги в скованост, късогледст
...more
Sharon Suri
Feb 02, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I love love love this book. This, and it's follow-up Making Globalization Work helped me to decide the area of work I wanted to get into. Already interested in International Development, I was still highly critical of so many of the ways it was addressed. This account, especially its details around the functioning of the World Bank and IMF clearly explained what otherwise seemed beyond my comprehension.

While this book may now seem a bit out of date, I still highly recommend to anyone who is int
...more
Alex Green
A little dated given the intervening years have seen the GFC however Stiglitz brings an interesting inside perspective of the effectiveness of International institutions reserving particular venom for the IMF. His knowledge of the mechanics of both the East Asian and Russian Crises are invaluable to any economic historian but the refrain is rather laboured and repetitive. Nonetheless with another Greek/Euro crisis in the offering his prescription for compassionately dealing with these financial ...more
Homa
Jul 26, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone everywhere
Joseph Stiglitz deserves a Nobel Prize...oh wait...oh yeah...

If you have ever been uneasy with the international financial institutions, you're in the majority. If your uneasiness has led you to say questionable things about things you don't understand, you're also in the majority. What better, then, than a book that takes your gut feelings on the topic and gives you valid evidence and nuanced arguments?
Hunter Marston
Jul 19, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A good critique of the standard Washington consensus advocated by the IMF, and a call to arms for the reform of international financial institutions. Timely, but I would like to read his more recent work following the "Great Recession." Stiglitz presents a coherent and easy-to-read global macroeconomics 101 for the everyday reader and for those who would like to learn more about global development studies.
Rachel Matsuoka
While I agree with Stiglitz that countries should be free to adopt globalization of markets on their own terms, the way in which his points were presented could have been better. Instead of this book being a critique of globalization and how it can be applied better to the modern-day world economy, we get a scathing review of the IMF. We get it, the IMF failed the third-world countries it set out to serve in many ways. I would've liked more about the issue at hand, moving forward.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Globalization and Its Discontents and latin america 1 18 Feb 24, 2009 07:04AM  
Stiglitz 2 24 Apr 23, 2008 09:07AM  
  • Development as Freedom
  • Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet
  • In Defense of Globalization
  • The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It
  • Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism
  • The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good
  • A Brief History of Neoliberalism
  • The Affluent Society
  • The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else
  • The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time
  • Debunking Economics - Revised and Expanded Edition: The Naked Emperor Dethroned?
  • World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability
  • One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth
  • Butterfly Economics: A New General Theory of Social and Economic Behavior
  • Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa
  • False Dawn: The Delusions of Global Capitalism
  • Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life
  • The Accidental Theorist and Other Dispatches from the Dismal Science
6426
Joseph Eugene Stiglitz, ForMemRS, FBA, is an American economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2001) and the John Bates Clark Medal (1979). He is also the former Senior Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank. He is known for his critical view of the management of globalization, free-market economists (whom h ...more
More about Joseph E. Stiglitz...
“...decisions were often made because of ideology and politics. As a result many wrong-headed actions were taken, ones that did not solve the problem at hand but that fit with the interests or beliefs of the people in power.” 6 likes
More quotes…