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A Room Of One's Own
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A Room Of One's Own

4.11  ·  Rating details ·  77,000 Ratings  ·  3,998 Reviews
A Room of One's Own grew out of a lecture that Virginia Woolf had been invited to give at Girton College, Cambridge in 1928. Ranging over Jane Austen and Charlotte Brontë and why neither of them could have written War and Peace, over the silent fate of Shakespeare's gifted (and imaginary) sister, over the effects of poverty and chastity on female creativity, she gives us o ...more
Paperback, 112 pages
Published October 31st 1991 by Penguin Books Ltd (first published October 24th 1929)
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Clive Campbell Since Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most important writers of any language ever, yes. Simply labeling Woolf with the term ''feminism'' is a…moreSince Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most important writers of any language ever, yes. Simply labeling Woolf with the term ''feminism'' is a little bit unfair since she was much more than just that. Although not one of my ''top 5'' favourite writers, Woolf is one of the most sympathetic and intelligent writers I have read and writes perhaps the most beautiful lines I have ever read in literature. Similarly, she is universally regarded along with George Orwell, Samuel Johnson and William Hazlitt as among the finest essay writers of the English language. Anything by Woolf (whether you like it or not) is worth reading for her intelligence, use of language, and influence on literature.(less)
Leonardo I think that if I had read this in middle school, some sentences would've confused me, and some social comments would've passed over my head. As its…moreI think that if I had read this in middle school, some sentences would've confused me, and some social comments would've passed over my head. As its content, there isn't anything inappropiate in the text for middle school students. But I would recommend a teacher guiding the reading and explaining some parts for full understanding of the context and the subtleties of the text(less)

Community Reviews

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Kelly
Every woman should read this. Yes, everyone who told me that, you were absolutely right. It is a little book, but it's quite likely to revitalize you. How many 113 page books and/or hour long lectures (the original format of this text) can say that?

This is Woolf's Damn The Man book. It is of course done in an overtly polite British way... until she brings up her fountain pen and stabs them right between the eyes. She manages to make this a work of Romantic sensibility, and yet modern, piercing,
...more
Lisa
Jul 25, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, nonfiction
I can't believe I only read this book now. I would have needed it when I was 18, and 25, and last year and yesterday!

The opening sentence caught me, right away:

"But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction - what has that got to do with a room of one's own?"

I don't even need to read Virginia Woolf's justification before I exclaim:

"EVERYTHING, it has EVERYTHING to do with a room of one's own!"

Whoever loves art, literature, and the act of writing, drawing or reading knows how ha
...more
Brina
Dec 04, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Reading my first work by Virginia Woolf was just what the reading doctor ordered after my frustrating experience with Kawabata over this past weekend. In the last few days, I have been organizing my reading challenges for next year, and decided to get a jump start on women's history as well as a January group read in catching up on classics by reading Woolf. Although written ninety years ago, Woolf could be discussing the status of women authors today. Her work remains timely and was a pure joy ...more
Trevor
There are so many books that one ‘just knows’ what they are going to be about. I have always ‘known’ about this book and ‘knew’ what it would be about. Feminist rant, right? Oh, these people do so preach to the choir, don’t they? Why do they hate men so much? In the end they are no different to the male chauvinists they are attacking. Why can’t they just be more even handed?

That none of this is the case, of course, does not matter at all, because reiterating received wisdom seems to be all that
...more
Samadrita
Words fail me as I seek to express what I think of Virginia Woolf. Or to sum up in a few measly paragraphs, a book that may just have shattered into a million pieces all my illusions about the art of writing and reshaped my whole perspective.

Have you ever imagined a disembodied voice whispering into your ears, the wisdom of the ages as you flipped through the pages of a book? how often have you conjured up the vision of the writer talking to you, teaching you, humoring you and coaxing you to ope
...more
Riku Sayuj

A World Of Her Own

“Here then I was (call me Mary Beton, Mary Seton, Mary Carmichael or by any name you please – it is not a matter of importance) sitting on the banks of a river a week or two ago in fine October weather, lost in thought.”

And they all do appear, as fictional novelists. Avatars of the Gauri.

Of course, I didn’t know they were so, and I didn't want to find out. I knew Woolf was perfectly capable of inventing novelists and novels inside this small thought-world she was spinning.

Wha
...more
Diane
The only thing better than reading Virginia Woolf is having her work performed by Juliet Stevenson.

I listened to this on audio, performed by the talented Juliet, and I was so impressed that I essentially listened to the book twice. In short, I lovedloveloved this essay by Woolf on women and fiction. When Woolf was asked to talk about women and fiction, she chose to focus on the poverty and subjugation of women in a patriarchy.


"A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fi
...more
Maria
Sep 04, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition

It's is 7:45 and Im already waiting dressed as best as I can with my dark suit and white/blue collar shirt outside the office for a meeting I've been expecting over a month. A meeting that perhaps will lead me get closer to accomplish a goal I've been working nonstop for years, just waiting for an opportunity to be given. After fifteen minutes, the secretary arrives and nicely welcomes me. She tells me that the meeting was arranged to be held at 2:00p.m. I don't show her the email and the alarm
...more
Maria Clara
Dec 19, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Hace unos meses un amigo me recomendó este libro, y ahora me arrepiento de no haberlo leído antes. Sin lugar a dudas es una pequeña joya revestida de ensayo, que te arrastra con su lenta caricia hacia el pasado, cuando la mujer vivía a la sombra del hombre. Un magnífico ensayo sobre la mujer y la escritura...
Dolors
Aug 10, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Readers and writers regardless of their gender
"A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” exposes Woolf and her multiple fictional narrators, Mary Beton, Mary Seton and Mary Carmichael, embodying the universal voices of female writers that once were and the ones that never came to be, while relentlessly beguiling the reader, sinuously spiralling him down with evocative prose, genial dexterity with words and an unapologetic tone dripping with irony, righteousness and lyricism.

Sitting on the riverside in fro
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
  • The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
  • Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity
  • The Female Eunuch
  • The Subjection of Women
  • Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future
  • This Sex Which Is Not One
  • BITCHfest: Ten Years of Cultural Criticism from the Pages of Bitch Magazine
  • The Laugh of the Medusa
  • How to Suppress Women's Writing
  • Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions
  • Feminism without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity
  • Sisterhood is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women's Liberation Movement
  • Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women
  • Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism
  • King Kong Theorie
  • Cunt: A Declaration of Independence
  • The Beauty Myth
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(Adeline) Virginia Woolf was an English novelist and essayist regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century.

During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury Group. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), and Orlando (1928), and the book-length es
...more
More about Virginia Woolf...
“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” 10411 likes
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” 3678 likes
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