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I Gave at the Office
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I Gave at the Office

3.70  ·  Rating details ·  60 ratings  ·  10 reviews
Is it still possible in this age of generation gap, counterculture, revolution and militancy to write a funny novel about Caribbean dictatorships, the FBI, American business, Women’s Lib, gun-running, Erwin Rommel, divorce, pot, police brutality, the New Morality and selling rifles to the Indians? The answer is a resounding “Yes” if you happen to be one of America’s funnie ...more
Unknown Binding, 223 pages
Published 1971 by Simon & Schuster
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3.70  · 
Rating details
 ·  60 ratings  ·  10 reviews


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Randy
Jul 25, 2011 rated it really liked it
This was a hard book to read, that is hard compared to other Westlake novels. Likely it was the story structure, set up as a series of cassette tapes explaining the protagonist's postion in a very touchy mess.

Jay Lake is a news reporter for the Network(he never speaks of it in more than the capitalized word). He's mostly a stand-in interviewer for the Big Name. What he does is meet whatever celebrity scheduled for interview for lunch with a series of questions prepared in advance, records the an
...more
E M
Aug 14, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Those under 55 or so probably oughtn't to bother with this review of the unbelievably funny I Gave at the Office. Although Westlake couldn't have written an unfunny book unless he tried (cf. Richard Stark), a knowledge of the history of the late 60's isn't enough to fully appreciate this uproarious satire; you had to have been there for the references to Women's Lib and street protests and Godless Communism and the New Morality to really resonate. But for anyone old enough to have experienced (o ...more
Book Concierge
Mar 01, 2011 rated it it was ok
2.5**

From the dust jacket: Is it still possible in this age of generation gap, counterculture, revolution and militancy to write a funny novel about Caribbean dictatorships, the FBI, American business, Women’s Lib, gun-running, Erwin Rommel, divorce, pot, police brutality, the new Morality and selling rifles to the Indians?

Jay Fisher is a major network television announcer/interviewer. He is quick to point out that he is not a journalist; his normal job is interviewing celebrities during lunch
...more
Sean Frost
Dec 22, 2016 rated it it was ok
I really like Westlake, but this one hasn't aged well. The portrayal of a network accidentally sponsoring a coup attempt is now farcical for being naive. The lazy misogyny of the crazed stalker ex doesn't help.
Zora
Apr 20, 2012 rated it it was amazing
I have great fondness for this older Westlake comedic novel about a hapless TV announcer who gets involved, against his will, with a Caribbean revolution and a network coverup of their involvement in it. One of Westlake's most interesting serious characters in a comic novel is the gun runner with a fascinatingly amoral view of his job. The best parts of the novel are the imbedded story about the tapes (that comprise the book's narrative) being made and what happens to them and the couple of very ...more
Will
Jan 26, 2009 rated it it was ok
Shelves: suspense-mystery
Although I like reading Westlake as pure mind candy, this wasn't one of my favorites. The author hits upon the device of depicting a man recording his side of the story on cassette tapes, a device that could be interesting and novel for a chapter or two, but becomes somewhat tedious by the end. The story is mostly about a loyal employee who ends up in the wrong place at the wrong time over and over again. A few entertaining bits, but the plot wasn't compelling enough for this kind of reading.
Denise M.
Sep 14, 2009 marked it as to-read
AKA: Alan Marshall, Alan Marsh, James Blue, Ben Christopher, Edwin West, John B. Allan, Curt Clark, Tucker Coe, P.N. Castor, Timothy J. Culver, J. Morgan Cunningham, Samuel Holt, Judson Jack Carmichael, Richard Stark, Donald E. Westlake
Margaret
Apr 11, 2011 rated it it was ok
Shelves: comic-crime
I get the point of it. It's very clever, for it's time. But kind of dated. Did anyone finish it and think it's worth the effort?
Mike Harper
Nov 02, 2013 rated it liked it
Not a Dortmunder novel, but very much like one. Written a long time ago, and it shows.
Stas
May 12, 2011 rated it really liked it
A most pleasant diversion.
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Donald E. Westlake (1933-2008) was one of the most prolific and talented authors of American crime fiction. He began his career in the late 1950's, churning out novels for pulp houses—often writing as many as four novels a year under various pseudonyms such as Richard Stark—but soon began publishing under his own name. His most well-known characters were John Dortmunder, an unlucky thief, and a ru ...more