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Golden Cities, Far

3.90  ·  Rating details ·  31 ratings  ·  3 reviews
A rich and joyous collection of tales of myth, magic and necromancy, by authors ancient and modern - all the way from the anonymous chronicler of perhaps the oldest of written fantasies - the Sumarian Angalta Kigalshe - to Anatole France and his Merrie Tales of Jacques Tournebroche. Here you will find extracts from the Egyptian Book of Thoth, from Ariosto's Orlando Furioso ...more
Mass Market, 299 pages
Published October 1970 by Ballantine Books (first published 1970)
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Average rating 3.90  · 
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Derek
So, if you think that a collection "largely devoted to ancient writers of classical antiquity and the Middle Ages" would be free of Lin Carter's self-promotional impulse, you would in fact be dead wrong. In this case he provides a reworked version of an English translation of the Sumerian Angalta Kigalshe. It may just be the least successful of the collection: he made use of antiquated verb forms and constructions--"hath", "descendeth", and so forth--rather than using the clean lines of contempo ...more
Joseph
Nov 13, 2013 rated it really liked it
Another Lin Carter-edited anthology from the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series. This one reminds us that people have been telling stories of gods, demons, swords, wizards, monsters and adventures for a long time -- the oldest pieces in this book date back to ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and even the most recent just barely push into the 20th Century. There's a good mix of standalone stories (The Talisman of Oromanes, The Yellow Dwarf, The White Bull) and excerpts from longer pieces (taken from H ...more
Andrew
Jun 05, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: fiction
Found this book, dusty and forgotten in the morale area of the camp I'm living at. So happy I grabbed it and gave it a try. I really, really enjoyed all of the folk/fairy tales, most of which I haven't heard of before. The editorial comments on the stories themselves are also fascinating and worthwhile. I'm plan on checking out the rest of Mr. Carter's collection. ...more
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123 followers
Linwood Vrooman Carter was an American author of science fiction and fantasy, as well as an editor and critic. He usually wrote as Lin Carter; known pseudonyms include H. P. Lowcraft (for an H. P. Lovecraft parody) and Grail Undwin.

Carter had a marked tendency toward self-promotion in his work, frequently citing his own writings in his nonfiction to illustrate points and almost always including at
...more

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