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Palladio

4.04  ·  Rating details ·  48 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
Palladio (1508-80) combined classical restraint with constant inventiveness. In this study, Professor Ackerman sets Palladio in the context of his age - the Humanist era of Michelangelo and Raphael, Titian and Veronese - and examines each of the villas, churches and palaces in turn and tries to penetrate to the heart of the Palladian miracle. Palladio's theoretical writing ...more
Paperback, 208 pages
Published July 25th 1991 by Penguin (first published 1966)
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J. J. Arias
Aug 08, 2009 rated it it was ok
Not for the general reader. Difficult to get through without background knowledge of architectural terms and theory.
Erik Schmitt
Sep 06, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Ackerman crafts a very compelling story out of the life and work of Palladio. You come away from reading this with a deep appreciation for this innovative architect and an understanding for why his impact has been so great. In particular the chapters on Palladio's villas in the Veneto are fascinating. I carried it in my backpack when I visited the region and toured some of the villas and cities like Vicenza where his work is concentrated and it greatly enhanced the experience.
Dan Vine
Oct 31, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: architecture
Thus is not the most exciting read but it is a thorough discussion of Palladio's work. You need to have the patience to go forward and back to look at plates. Frequent recourse to the interwebs for supplementary images is also useful.
Marie
Nov 04, 2013 rated it it was amazing
This is a lovely little gem of a book that I keep coming back to.
Tedb0t
May 28, 2008 rated it liked it
About as lively as Palladio's corpse, but still more interesting than watching paint dry. ...maybe.
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James S. Ackerman, Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Fine Arts Emeritus at Harvard University and a Fellow and former Trustee of the American Academy in Rome, was born in San Francisco in 1919 and studied at Yale and New York University. He is a former editor of the Art Bulletin, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a corresponding member of the British Academy, the Accadem ...more
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