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The Disappeared

3.84  ·  Rating details ·  99 ratings  ·  27 reviews
The Disappeared is a story of our times, of kidnap and rescue, of abuse and healing. It is the story of Stephen, a teacher whose love for the pupil who shares his dreams brings him face to face with ruin; of Sharon, the child of a feckless stepmother, and her criminal abusers; of Laura, the investigative high-flyer, now faced with rape and sexual slavery; of Justin, enviro ...more
ebook, 232 pages
Published February 26th 2015 by Bloomsbury Reader (first published January 1st 2015)
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Carleton Raisbeck *spoiler* Ophelia is not supposed to be Muhibbah. On page 88 and 89, when Stephen goes to Iona, the social worker, we hear from her a story about anot…more*spoiler* Ophelia is not supposed to be Muhibbah. On page 88 and 89, when Stephen goes to Iona, the social worker, we hear from her a story about another girl at Angel Towers called Moira Callaghan. Stephen says on page 89 in reference to Iona's narrative, "For clearly it described the girl whom Sharon had called Ophelia, her only friend in true times of adversity." I can see why you might think otherwise though; the essay comes before the visit to the social worker, and the only other missing person named is Muhibbah. I wondered the same thing at the time.(less)

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Elyse  Walters
Jan 06, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: netgalley
I'm not sure what I was expecting when I chose this book --not knowing anyone who had read it before me --unfamiliar with this author -- but I was NOT expecting extremely intelligent writing which explores Afghan migrants living in Britain, and a multicultural sensitive story....with vivid characters that will make you FEEL! (nails-on-the chalk board FEEL).

To be honest --this book is so powerful --I wish a 'real' writer was writing this review --as I just don't know where to begin to describe al
...more
Jules
Jan 06, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: netgalley
This is by far one of the most powerful novels I have read in a long time!

This is rather a complex novel, in that there are quite a few characters and different events taking place. However, as the story progresses, the focus from one event to another become easier to follow, especially as you learn of the connections between the people and events. In fact, the gradual putting together of each event and learning of the connections between all the characters and their circumstances, was exception
...more
—ReadAlongWithSue—


If you are looking for a cosy read, this is not it.
If you are looking for a dark read on the wrong side of humanity, this is it.

If you are looking for something to curl up with, this is not it.
If you are looking for something that you hate reading but compelled to carry on, this is for you.


I make no bones at the fact its an easy straight forward book to read. It really stretches you emotionally.

It takes a slooow while [and yes I did drag out the slooow] while to piece each character and it takes
...more
Bernadette Robinson
9/10 from me.

This is the first book that I've read by this Author, it was well written and well thought out.

I found it a disturbing but compelling read about the dark side of humanity and the depraved world that we sadly live in. This book is definitely not a cosy story by any stretch of the imagination and I feel that it would make a great reading group read due to the nature of the subject.

It's a many layered story with quite a cast of characters, some nice and some definitely not so nice. As
...more
Tina Price
Jan 20, 2015 rated it it was amazing
I have had to think long and hard before reviewing "The Disappeared" because reading it has been a powerful experience. The first half of the novel is quite complex, as the storylines are developed. The main characters are so varied and so well developed that really careful reading is justified.

The author draws the plot together in quite a subtle and satisfying manner, allowing for significant development of his characters, their relationships and their understanding of the complex central theme
...more
Sarah Johnson
Mar 28, 2015 rated it liked it
The subject matter is important and bravely dealt with. The issues of child sex abuse, trafficking, all bundled into one plot which does not quite sustain the weight of such enormous themes.

I have racked my brains trying to figure out why I don't quite like this book. What is it that leaves me cold? The characterisation is disappointing - perhaps that's the main reason. We are told several times on a page how flawlessly beautiful a woman is...and in my imagination she ceases to be a character a
...more
Spencer
Apr 08, 2015 rated it did not like it
I will never read another novel by an author with an axe to grind. life is too short. cut out all the fluff and write it in an essay. ok, i get it, maybe the potential emotive power or structure of a good yarn has a kind of epistomological value, where truth is communicated like with a poem or a painting. but i dont have the time or the patience. just say it, or maybe make a heavy handed soviet style propaganda poster that conveys your point
Donna Davis
The Disappeared was published in UK, and is now available to readers in the USA. Scruton shines a spot light on victims of domestic violence, trafficking, and rape. It’s a timely issue, and no one can read his story and walk away unmoved. Thanks go to Bloomsbury Reader for inviting me to read and review the DRC free in exchange for an honest review. This book is available to the public tomorrow, February 26.

The stories evolve around three women’s stories; we have Sharon, Muhibbah, and the reader
...more
eden
Feb 02, 2015 rated it liked it
Shelves: read-2015
I think if you liked the movie Crash, you will perhaps like this novel. It is similarly structured (alternating characters who are all connected) and, like Crash, very much devoted to thematic considerations.

Roger Scruton is a philosopher and prolific author of primarily non-fiction, which definitely shows in The Disappeared, his latest fiction effort. People talk about stories being "ripped from the headlines", and this one really is. You might recall that it was revealed not too long ago that
...more
Christina
Jan 20, 2015 rated it liked it
The Disappeared has quite a complex narrative and if I tried to provide a synopsis, I feel I wouldn't be able to do it justice. I struggled with this book. To say I can't explain why would make me an awful reviewer, but sometimes books just don't gel with you and you find them hard to read, without being able to pinpoint why. I found I was forcing myself to get through this book, which took away some of the enjoyment of reading and with the huge amount of characters within the book, I found it h ...more
Amy
Apr 07, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Amazing tale of abuse and redemption

Escape from the political correctness that has imprisoned young girls as victims of sexual assault in England leaves no one unscathed. This story weaves these tragic lives together slowly at first. As the pieces come together, we can see the emptiness of the ideals of multiculturalism, an ideal the shields abusers from any consequences and traps victims in a cycle of abuse. Drawn straight from the news, there is a fresh and unflinching honesty in this book.
Justin Griffiths-Bell
Apr 02, 2015 rated it really liked it
Not the rantings of the swivel-eyed lunatic that the Guardian has sometimes made Scruton out to be, this novel wins because it is brave and exhilarating and never loses sight of an essential humanity that transcends all cultures and persists through the most horrific abuses and privations. Not a philosophical novel, but this is a strong and consuming yarn that calls to mind Thackery and Dickens, which given the subject matter is quite fitting.
AmAtHome
Aug 11, 2017 rated it really liked it
From the description of the book, I was expecting more of a "thriller" type novel then I felt this was.
"The Disappeared is a story of our times, of kidnap and rescue, of abuse and healing. It is the story of Stephen, a teacher whose love for the pupil who shares his dreams brings him face to face with ruin; of Sharon, the child of a feckless stepmother, and her criminal abusers; of Laura, the investigative high-flyer, now faced with rape and sexual slavery; of Justin, environmentalist and Heavy
...more
Vnunez-Ms_luv2read
Aug 03, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: netgalley
This was a dark book to read, not because of the writing but the subject matter. Two men caught up in trying to protect one female. What they are trying to save her from? Read the book. I have not read a book on human trafficking, abuse, and other atrocities of white women by Muslim and Asian immigrants. This book was hard to read in some spots, graphic in some parts but the ending brings it all together. Despite the subject matter, I think this would make an excellent book for a book club read. ...more
D.
Oct 20, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Sir Roger Scruton's third novel is one of the most powerful, disturbing, and gut-wrenching piece of literature I've read recently. The text is a honest look at the horrors of sex trafficking and England's slow civil decay and her crisis of immigration. He writes with great humility, a sense of utter realism bereft of any sense of ideology left or right, and a style utterly unknown to today's Hemingwayesque prose.
Bruce
Aug 01, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Have been listening to RS over the past few weeks on YouTube etc and found him very interesting. Given that most of his works (40+!) are philosophical I thought it interesting how he would handle writing a novel. I found it a good read from beginning to end. It had a clear plot, good characters, intelligently and perceptively written dealing with difficult issues (and people) with sensitivity ands impartiality. I look forward to reading his "Notes from the underground".
Polly Krize
Aug 28, 2017 rated it really liked it
I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Exceptionally elegant writing detailing abuse, kidnapping, rape...all in today's society. Told in a very well-developed writing style, all characters are full and well described, and although graphic, the story pulls together so well. Recommended reading.
Seth Nightengale
Dec 18, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Enjoyable, nuanced, and artful. Pulls no punches.
Ranjana
Jun 14, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: 2018
A thought provoking book that starts off very well but the plot gets more and more twisted and over-dramatised for the characters and the story to be believable.
Jerrodm
This book avoids being a "don't bother" only because I think it's useful to read things with which you fundamentally disagree if only to provide occasional perspective on the way that others view the world. The Disappeared is a useful, if disheartening, reminder of what makes people afraid of and resistant to immigration by people who are "too different" from them. It concerns a group of people whose stories are drawn together as they try to deal with the impact of immigration and immigrant comm ...more
Laura Balio
May 29, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
On one level, this is a novel about the ways we disappear – the ways we hide ourselves, the ways we are stolen, and the ways we are exiled. But it is also about the ways we are found and redeemed.

On the surface, it’s a story about the things we can’t or don’t talk about: rape, human trafficking, pedophilia, inter-religious relations, political correctness, and immigration. Roger Scruton writes unflinchingly, but with great compassion and quiet skill he weaves his story. He draws us in, breathle
...more
Laura Balio
May 29, 2015 rated it it was amazing
On one level, this is a novel about the ways we disappear – the ways we hide ourselves, the ways we are stolen, and the ways we are exiled. But it is also about the ways we are found and redeemed.

On the surface, it’s a story about the things we can’t or don’t talk about: rape, human trafficking, pedophilia, inter-religious relations, political correctness, and immigration. Roger Scruton writes unflinchingly, but with great compassion and quiet skill he weaves his story. He draws us in, breathle
...more
Elizabeth Grieve
Mar 29, 2015 rated it liked it
Well, this book made me angry. Not at the writer, but at the dreadful injustices and fear of being accused of 'racism' which sadly abound in Britain these days, largely thanks to the political correctness brought on as a result of the uncontrolled immigration policies of the last Labour government, the EU, and immigrants' refusal to integrate into the society which has offered refuge, housing and welfare benefits.

The story appears to be partly based on the 'grooming' and sexual abuse of young wh
...more
Joel Zartman
Jul 04, 2016 rated it it was amazing
You can read reams of Scruton's non-fiction, and you will learn a lot by doing so. Sometimes his prose requires perseverance, often what he is saying is just very difficult. He is a man of immense learning, understanding, sympathy and insight. But if you can't learn from Roger Scruton it is because something is wrong with you.

There is an easier way, also. The alternative is to pick up his fiction: Notes from Underground and The Disappeared, and may there be more. It is much easier to read, fille
...more
Cassie
Mar 19, 2015 rated it liked it
I received an eARC copy of this book from the publisher. Here is my honest review.

I'm not really sure how I'm going to rate this book, which is an odd place to be when writing a review. The plot was gripping although after the first two chapters, the point of view shifted to what seemed to be a completely unrelated story. Scruton masterfully wove three seemingly unconnected stories together. The plot was the best part of this book. The characters were interesting and the writing style (almost st
...more
james grierson doyle
rated it it was amazing
Apr 16, 2015
Richard
rated it it was amazing
Oct 12, 2017
Bonnie Wunderlich
rated it it was amazing
Oct 12, 2018
Ed Thompson
rated it liked it
Oct 18, 2019
Carl
rated it really liked it
Feb 28, 2016
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Sir Roger Scruton was a writer and philosopher who has published more than forty books in philosophy, aesthetics and politics. He was a fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. He taught in both England and America and was a Visiting Professor at Department of Philosophy and Fellow of Blackfriars Hall, Oxford, he was also a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Publ ...more

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