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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Oz #1)

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3.98  ·  Rating details ·  286,335 Ratings  ·  9,240 Reviews
HarperCollins is proud to present its new range of best-loved, essential classics.‘“Come along, Toto,” she said. “We will go to the Emerald City and ask the Great Oz how to get back to Kansas again.”’Swept away from her home in Kansas by a tornado, Dorothy and her dog Toto find themselves stranded in the fantastical Land of Oz. As instructed by the Good Witch of the North ...more
Paperback, Penguin Popular Classics, 154 pages
Published 1995 by Penguin (first published May 17th 1900)
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Kerry They are quite different things. The 1939 film is (deservedly) a classic. It is somewhat faithful to the book but also is more complex in many ways…moreThey are quite different things. The 1939 film is (deservedly) a classic. It is somewhat faithful to the book but also is more complex in many ways and adds new layers, like the overlay of life in Kansas vs. Oz (Miss Gulch/Wicked witch, farmhands as Scarecrow, Tin Man, etc).

The visuals are stunning. It is more dramatic ("surrender Dorothy") and better structured to build drama and tell the story. In the book, things happen and then are resolved in the next chapter. In the film, things build and build to a much more spectacular climax. And then the flying monkeys are so much more terrifying than in the book, one of the greatest villains of film history.

Yes, the film can't cover all the extra material of the entire series, (especially the political subtexts) and the later character evolution, but on a film vs the first book of the series comparison, the film is vastly superior in my opinion.(less)
Hailey Robins As it is a fairytale I think that it could be a children's book but I also think that as adults I would like to re-read it. My family loves it though…moreAs it is a fairytale I think that it could be a children's book but I also think that as adults I would like to re-read it. My family loves it though and I definitely recommend this book for anyone that likes fairytales (less)
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Community Reviews

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Hailey (HaileyinBookland)
Ah such fun! I don't think I'll read the rest of the series but I did really enjoy this.
mark monday
 photo dorothy_zpsfa87eb6e.gif

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Rick Polito, Marin Independent Journal, 1998
David
Jan 06, 2011 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Once upon a time there lived a Golden Age gay icon, who whiled away her pre-waxing years sitting atop a split-rail fence in some dour, nondescript American Midwest landscape. Her dreams of a more outrageously fierce existence in the big city (wearing roller skates and one-foot-diameter afro wigs and dancing to Army of Lovers in between lines of blow) were hemmed in on all sides by rusted farm equipment, NAPA Auto Parts Stores, and a lone, dejected Applebee’s out on the turnpike. Kansas didn’t ev ...more
Hannah Greendale
Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend.

Dorothy Gale and her little dog Toto are swept away by a tornado from Kansas all the way to the Land of Oz. With a little help from the Witch of the North, Dorothy and Toto set off down a road paved with yellow bricks in search of the City of Emeralds and the Wizard of Oz, a man said to have the power to help Dorothy find her way back to Kansas.

The cyclone had set the house down, very gently - for a cyclone
...more
Riku Sayuj
Sep 29, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: classics, r-r-rs

The Wizard of Oz as An Economic Parable: A Short Introduction

This might be common knowledge or it might not be. Some economics textbooks claim this is a wonderfully esoteric nugget: The story of Oz was an economic parable. Take that, all you who said economics can't be fun.

Redistributions of wealth caused by unexpected changes in the price level are often a source of political turmoil. From 1880 to 1896 the price level in the United States fell 23 percent. This deflation was good for Haves (cred
...more
Zoë
Feb 22, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Book 20/100 for 2015

I really, really liked this book! I honestly had pretty low expectations going into this book and thought it wouldn't compare at all to the greatness of the 1939 movie (which is one of my favorite movies), but I was wrong. It was one of the best children's classics that I've ever read and I even loved how it wasn't that similar to the movie, so it kept me interested. I also had a beautiful hardcover Puffin Classics edition, so that make the experience even better! All in all,
...more
Luca Ambrosino
Jun 04, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
ENGLISH (The Wonderful Wizard of Oz) / ITALIANO

Dorothy is a young girl who lives with her aunts in a small farm in Kansas. Due to a tornado, she is catapulted with her house in a freaky village...

Dorothy's journey, which I discovered at 38 thanks to my daughter and to the well-established habit of reading something to her before going to bed, begins in this way. The thing that impressed me most about this wonderful story is that the title "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" is rather misleading. Yes,

...more
Henry Avila
Aug 06, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Dorothy, (from Kansas, wherever that is) lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, on the flat American prairie, the harsh Sun beating down from the gray sky, making everything turn gray ... the gray grass, house, clothes and especially the people, animals, are probably gray too, might seem the least likely place that she visits, that is real. No trees, brooks, beautiful birds singing or anything colorful around the poor farm. But our adventures begin when a tornado lifts unlucky Dorothy , her dog ...more
Brina
Nov 05, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kids, classics
To Oz? To Oz! The film version of The Wizard of Oz is such an important part of American history that I most likely had it memorized by the time I was eight years old. Between the music, images changing from black and white to color, and the defeat of a wicked witch, the movie was simply magical. Being a tomboy, however, my reading interests as a child were never inclined toward classic books such as Little Women and, of course, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Having my interest piqued by the yearly ...more
Richard
This is a book I read as a child, even before I saw the musical, and enjoyed a lot. However, my memory of it was overshadowed by the film. So it was a good experience to read it again as an adult.

The book is worth reading, not least because it differs in some major ways from the film adaptation. The biggest difference is that the whole dream sequence scenario, in which people from Kansas are transmogrified into figures of fantasy, is entirely absent. Dorothy wears Silver Shoes, not Ruby Slippers
...more
Bookdragon Sean
This is one of the most bizarre books I've ever read.

The fantasy elements are all rather ordinary. There’s a secret world beyond that of our own; this is a standard trope of the genre. C.S Lewis would soon follow suit and inspire later generations. But the point is the Land of Oz is just weird.

Seems like a bland criticism, though the entire point of the plot is to have good triumph over evil. But what is evil? Beyond the actual name of the antagonist, the Wicked Witch of the West, we don’t act
...more
Evgeny
Aug 21, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: children
Some books are so well-known practically every person who has even a very brief knowledge of general literature knows that these books are about. In the light of this I really have no clue why I would bother to outline the plot of this one, but just in case somebody managed to miss it here goes. A little girl is transported into a magical land where she meets all kinds of magical creatures. She goes to visit the greatest wizard of the land hoping he would help her to get home.

I want to get some
...more
Lisa
"There is no place like Oz!"

Most people are at some point facing the situation that something throws them off track. The reason might not be that a tornado catches your house and dumps it later in a strange land - on a wicked witch - but something quite similar in intensity might well happen to any of you. You will find yourselves lost, helpless, sad and without orientation in a strange place. What can you do? The first rule for Oz travellers is to stick together even if your worries and needs
...more
Katie
Dec 21, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I thought it interesting that in the foreword Baum says he didn't want this to be violent like the fairytales of the past... and yet, a little girl transports to a strange land, kills the first person she meets, and teams up with three strangers to kill again. They also kill various creatures on their path of destruction.
Perhaps we could savor all the violence but have a much more abridged version with the following:
Wizard of Oz, the short version

Jason Koivu
Sep 02, 2010 rated it liked it
Shelves: fiction, fantasy
A wonderful tale for its time, this book has transcended its own intentions and exploded into an iconic creation that continues to instill its fans with cherished, lifelong memories.

description

Although I usually prefer the original books over their movie adaptions, I have to hand it to the film this time. The Wizard of Oz took the best from the source material and embellished what was missing, adding what they needed to in order to create a truly magical experience that has endured to this day.

description

The book an
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Nayra.Hassan
كانوا أربعة..ولكن ليس كأي أربعة..خرجوا للبحث عما ينقصهم..لم يكتفوا بالتمني...تغلبوا على العقبات...بالكثير من الحب..وهناك في مدينة الزمرد حصلوا على ما تمنوه..ولكن بعد ان أدركوا قيمة ما لديهم ..
شكلت تلك الرواية جزء ثابت من طفولتنا ..لمن قراها ولمن شاهد الفيلم. .الابطال محملين برموز..
فخيال الماتة هو الفلاح المتهم في ذكاؤه..مهما كانت اهميته..ورجل الصفيح يرمز للعامل ومعانته من الآلية والجمود ..اما الأسد فهو السياسي المرتعد للأبد من فقدان منصبه .. ولا اتذكر حقا الى ماذا ترمز دوروثي
طابع القصة أمريكي ج
...more
Lindsey Rey
Dec 11, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: childrens, 2015
This was very good!
Mohsin Maqbool
May 28, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: favorites
description
An innovative cover of Frank L. Baum's book.

MOST of us have read L. Frank Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" and have enjoyed it. Many of us have also seen the 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz" which has been adapted from the book. So I am not going to write a review of the book or provide you any details about Dorothy, her pet dog Toto or any of her friends -- The Scarecrow, The Tin Woodman and The Cowardly Lion. I will just recount to you an incident from my schoolboy days which has great relevanc
...more
Olivier Delaye
Jun 09, 2012 rated it it was amazing
First Fantasy YA to ever see the light of day? Nope.

Flawless piece of literature? Nope. But then again is there even such a thing as a flawless book?

Thought-provoking? Nope. Well, not anymore. Maybe when it came out it was. Probably.

Groundbreaking? Yeah, kinda. In its own way.

Simplistic prose and tropes? Sure, love it! Just as much as I love hard, complicated and even purple prose and seen-before tropes. Just because you've read the same trope time and time again doesn't make it suddenly horribl
...more
Ammara Abid
Feb 13, 2017 rated it really liked it
Wonderful wonderland.
Brad
May 18, 2009 rated it it was ok
Recommends it for: Parents
Recommended to Brad by: Gregory Maguire
My disappointment with the children's classics (with the exception of Pinocchio) has continued with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

It isn't bad. It really isn't, but it is not great either. It's nowhere near great. I wish I could say I was baffled by how this became the worldwide sensation it became, but that would be a lie. On stage and on film, The Wizard of Oz has become THE go-to kids entertainment of the last 80-odd years. It is so pervasive as to be a sort of children's propaganda entertainmen
...more
Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈
I am determined to find the brilliance in Wicked so I've decided that sometimes, going to the root of the problem will bring clarity and perspective. I read this when I was very young and don't remember it. I really think I won't be able to understand Wicked until I re-read the original tale. So here goes...

Review 4/3/15

Read a book that was made into a movie

I think everyone has seen the movie or the musical or both, so unless you've been living under a rock or in an apocalyptic shelter for the p
...more
Melki
One of my earliest childhood memories involves my grandparents, aunt, uncle and some of my cousins coming to my house one evening to watch The Wizard of Oz. Why the big to-do? My dad's college professor salary had allowed us to own the only color television in the family. I remember the oohs and ahs exhaled by my relatives (and me) when Dorothy first stepped out of her gray world into the brilliant, Technicolor land of Oz! And, how my cousin Roxy fell asleep before the intrepid gang made it into ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz = The Wizard of Oz (Oz #1), L. Frank Baum
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is an American children's novel written by author L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W. W. Denslow, originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Chicago on May 17, 1900. It has since been reprinted on numerous occasions, most often under the title The Wizard of Oz, which is the title of the popular 1902 Broadway musical adaptation as well as the iconic 1939 musical film adaptation.
The story ch
...more
Whispering Stories
The story of Dorothy, her little dog Toto and the cyclone that took her from Kansas to the Land of Oz, has been recognised by the Library of Congress as ‘America’s greatest and best-loved homegrown fairytale’.

The original book by L. Frank Baum was published in 1900. Since then there have been numerous reprints of the book, plus movies, TV series, and stage shows.

You only have to put ‘Wizard of Oz’ into any search engine and it will bring up many, many sites that sell memorabilia. I wonder though
...more
Barbara
“Io voglio un cuore, perché il cervello non basta a farti felice, e la felicità è la cosa piú bella che esista al mondo.”
Mike (the Paladin)
Oct 09, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy, classics
I read this the first time when I was maybe 10 years old maybe younger, I'm not sure. I read that version over and over till the covers fell off and the first twelve pages were gone. Oddly, i never read all the other OZ books, but I love(ed) this one.

Update: Thanks, I just got a like on my abbreviated review above^.

This was one of the few books I owned as a child (literally one of a few. I had 3 books. Other than that I read Child Craft the World Book Encyclopedia, my dad's collection of Zane G
...more
MJ Nicholls
Dorothy is actually a dumpy, doughy backwater farmgirl in this book. She would have grown into a stout, strong-limbed muscular farmers’ wife with no time for things like affection or intercourse, but a damn good head for cornshuckin’ at 99 degrees in the hawt Kansassy summer. So the well-worn epithet ‘no place like home’ is of course a vicious ironic phrase meaning ‘shit, you’d better get outta that backwater Kansas wheat paddy before stupidity, indolence, routine, depression and phenobarbital a ...more
Lauren
Before reading this I had no idea what this book was about or who the characters were. I only read it because I wanted to read a retelling of it so of course I needed to read the original first. Usually with children books if I don't like them then I say 'I think I would have liked this as a child' but not for this book. I didn't exactly like it now and I don't think I would have liked it as a child. It was an okay book but I won't be picking it up ever again.
Lata
3.5 stars. I was only familiar with the 1939 movie and the musical, The Wiz, and wanted to know what the actual story was. I actually preferred this original text over the popular versions. Dorothy is a little too good for words, making her a not particularly believable person, though she's not objectionable. I like the characterizations of Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Lion here, finding more humour and a certain grimness in their stories not seen in their pop culture iterations. I was sur ...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
  • The Royal Book of Oz (Oz, #15)
  • Mary Poppins (Mary Poppins, #1)
  • Elmer and the Dragon (My Father's Dragon, #2)
  • The Borrowers (The Borrowers, #1)
  • Oz: Ozma of Oz (Marvel Classics)
  • The 13 Clocks
  • The Cricket on the Hearth
  • Finn Family Moomintroll (The Moomins, #3)
  • The Hunting of the Snark
  • The Green Fairy Book
  • Pinocchio
  • Dolphin Treasure (Dolphin Adventure #3)
  • The Phoenix and the Carpet (Five Children, #2)
  • Farmer Boy (Little House, #3)
  • Betsy-Tacy (Betsy-Tacy, #1)
  • King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table
  • Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens / Peter and Wendy
3242
also wrote under the name Edith Van Dyne, Floyd Akers

Lyman Frank Baum was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children's literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a pleth
...more
More about L. Frank Baum...

Other Books in the Series

Oz (1 - 10 of 15 books)
  • The Marvelous Land of Oz (Oz, #2)
  • Ozma of Oz (Oz, #3)
  • Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (Oz, #4)
  • The Road to Oz (Oz, #5)
  • The Emerald City of Oz (Oz #6)
  • The Patchwork Girl of Oz (Oz, #7)
  • Tik-Tok of Oz (Oz, #8)
  • The Scarecrow of Oz (Oz, #9)
  • Rinkitink in Oz (Oz, #10)
  • The Lost Princess of Oz (Oz, #11)
“There is no place like home.” 3091 likes
“I think you are wrong to want a heart. It makes most people unhappy. If you only knew it, you are in luck not to have a heart.” 1074 likes
More quotes…