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Ozymandias

4.31  ·  Rating details ·  798 Ratings  ·  41 Reviews
A picture book edition of the poem. The poem, Ozymandias, was composed in 1817. It is one of the most famous poems of P.B. Shelley. It was composed in competition with Shelley's friend, Horace Smith who wrote another sonnet on the same topic named Ozymandias. The theme of this sonnet is the decline of all leaders of all the empires they built. However mighty they have been ...more
36 pages
Published 1999 by Hoopoe Books (first published 1817)
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Bookdragon Sean
Percy Shelley saw the world for what it was, and what it will be. He saw through the cracks of civilisation and human greed; he saw what man has become and will always be unless he changes. Ozymandias is a simple homage to human power, to human corruption and to human ruling. This is a poem with true universal value.

"I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frow
...more
David Sarkies
Jan 10, 2012 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Anybody with two minutes to spare and a smart phone
Recommended to David by: My English Teacher
Shelves: poetry
The Legacy of Rameses
10 January 2012

This is a rather short poem, a sonnet to be precise, being a poem of sixteen lines with a specific metre. Now, while I like poetry, I would hardly call myself a poet in that my skill in writing metre is not the best, and in many cases I fall into a system of rhyme, which I find to be pretty corny (at least to my ears). This does not mean that I have not attempted poetry in my life, and many of the poems that I have written tend to be rather short (none of the
...more
Dana
Sep 30, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: poetry, school, historical
Fame, power, money...all are temporary. Everything is subjected to time and time swallows them up. Man is insignificant before the power of time. The poet uses a shattered statue to highlight the ephemeral nature of fame, vanity and power. The one great king's proud words "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings, Look upon my work, ye mighty and despair" has been ironically disproved. Ozymandias works and might have crumbled to pieces. His civilization has disappeared and all has been razed or brou ...more
Sarah
Dec 06, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: poetry, english-lit
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Beautiful. Yet in a way, very telling of the insignificance of our lives. Power, fame and money all only exist from the time we are born until the time we die, then slowly but surely time and nature are sure to forget about us. Even our own species forgets, thus making us buried in the sands of
...more
Carlos Ibanez
Mar 18, 2015 rated it it was amazing
A great poem, that talks about the power and mighty of the great pharaoh Ramses II (Ozymandias) that crumbled.

"My name is Ozymandias,
King of kings
Look on my works,
Ye mighty and despair"

this might be the most memorable quote in the poem, we can understand how the the author (and may be even the pharaoh) though of him as the king of kings.
And to be honest, a poem as powerful and beautiful like this one wouldn't deserve a rank of five star it would deserve like an eight star rank
Benjamin Stahl
Mar 23, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: uni-related
A very short but striking poem by the guy who was having sex with the girl who wrote Frankenstein. Fucking there's your contextual analysis, Mr Oxford don, you ...
Ȝmman Saqqaf
Aug 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Recommended to Ȝmman by: Majd Saqqaf
Nothing lasts forever. Glory, reputation, conquests or occupations, everything will come to an end eventually. This ambiguous ode carries between its folds heaps of philosophical matters.
Scholars really tired themselves giving different interpretations for this poem and many others. I believe that the beauty of a poem lies in the multiplicity of its interpretations by each person. Everyone has his own vision and saying about what he reads, sees or hears and there is no right or wrong when it co
...more
Bettie☯
Oct 06, 2010 rated it it was ok
Nation's Favourite Poems: features in a 1996 nationwide poll compilation.

From wiki - t is frequently anthologised and is probably Shelley's most famous short poem. It was written in competition with his friend Horace Smith, who wrote another sonnet entitled "Ozymandias"

Famous it might be, and the subject grand, it just doesn't 'do' it for me.
Sneh Pradhan
Aug 12, 2013 rated it liked it
"........and Nothing beside remains. Round the decay of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare , the lone and level sands stretch far away ..." These last lines of the sonnet stay with you as the poem unearths the ephemeral essence of life and hits you with it immediately !!!
Sofia
Aug 15, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry, 2016



Here read by Bryan Cranston

a great putter in place and it also creates a sort of calm, being at peace.
Sarah Pangloss
Apr 07, 2009 rated it it was amazing
I have always loved this poem - especially since I have spent so much time in Egpyt, at Luxor. I will - and have - read this poem many,many times throughout my entire lifetime. It resonates within my soul, as I realize not just that all is transitory. "Look upon my works, ye Mighty, and despair."
Katie Robinson
Jun 23, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is one of those practically perfect poems that you can have endless destructions on. I also love the rhythm.
Chels Patterson
Aug 21, 2017 rated it it was amazing
It's an amazing poem. Really very moving.
Emily
May 16, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Emily by: McLean
Shelves: classics, poems
This is a very classic poem of Shelley's referencing many of the old rulers in Egypt.
Jason
Nov 11, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Anyone, Poetry
Recommended to Jason by: Public School
Shelves: dystopian, classics, 2016
Patton was on tonight, and this poem came to my mind while I was watching it. I have no idea why.

It's no secret that I can't stand poetry, but I do have a couple of poems that I love, and this is one of them. I was introduced to it in... well, I don't know. I definitely read it in 12th grade English, but I might've hit it in ninth grade as well, and possibly seventh. If I'm right about the other two years, then the Henrico county public school system really liked it.

This is so short I'll just pu
...more
John Yelverton
Mar 08, 2017 rated it it was amazing
To say that this poem in poignant is like saying the sky is blue. There are so many people who need to realize that most monuments built unto oneself wind up on the trash heap of history.
Blossom Reddy
Mar 06, 2017 rated it it was amazing
the desert id the best part @@ ozymandias

Achi
Feb 16, 2017 rated it really liked it
Short, but mesmerizing poem... great example that nothing stands against time, nor power, nor fame, nor money.
even the huge empire that once was stretched across the desert, now is covered with sand and dust.
TV Show "Breaking Bad" made one of the best episode by this name, which is clear visualization of what this poem represents. The Fall.

‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and
...more
Eric
Jul 08, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: poetry, reviewed, 2014
This is a review and ranking of the poem, rather than the book noted above.

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Ozyma
...more
Kenza Harrouch
Apr 24, 2016 rated it really liked it
This poem shows that even the powerful people such as Ozymandias, after they died nothing will remain round. Ozymandias thought that he was the king of kings that nobody like him in the world. He was arrogant and very proud of himself, but nowhere is just a piece of history. Even his statue is destroyed by nature's destruction of his human vanity. To conclude, power has a limit, has a period and nothing is immortal.
Dione Basseri
Easily my all-time favorite poem. While it's all about the intransience of human creations, for me it's more promising than melancholy. Certainly, my own works will someday be little more than dust upon which greater works stand, but this also means that the more harmful works of mankind shall someday be forgotten. It's a reminder to be humble, but also hopeful.
Tim
Apr 12, 2013 rated it really liked it
Short and because of that, and its inherent value, worth reading a couple times in succession. I read it first to get a grasp of what it was then, then to dig into the meaning, then to address the meter and mechanics. Worthwhile.
Sheila
Nov 10, 2012 rated it it was ok
Shelves: poetry
I had to look up and read this poem after reading a book titled The Shattered Visage Lies, because the line "shattered visage lies" is in this poem. Logical, right.

Stephanie Angelini
Aug 05, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Shelley isn't my favorite Romantic, but Ozymandias is killer. I love this poem. If you read one poem from him, try this one. I also think the title should be the name of a heavy metal band. How about Ozymandias and the Romantics? Anyone want to join me? ;)
Raghad Khamees
Jun 27, 2014 rated it it was amazing
I read this poem and I analyzed it
Such an amazing one
Ăhmąd Elägamy
Dec 01, 2014 rated it liked it
3.5 stars
Liz
Jul 15, 2009 rated it it was amazing
this is epic. i shows how no matter how powerful or feared you are in your time, once you die it is over. "look ye mighty and despair" i love the language he used.
Jason
Sep 12, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: poetry, 19th-century
Read in 12th grade.

4/5 Stars
Luke
Apr 15, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Just a sonnet, but not. Probably my favorite sonnet not written by Billy Shakes. It's use in a Breaking Bad trailer read by Bryan Cranston makes it that much cooler.
Ariane
Sep 23, 2012 rated it really liked it
My father suggested I read it during the Joe Paterno scandal. How apropos.
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Reading the Classics: Ozymandias 17 169 Dec 05, 2013 10:37AM  
  • The Tyger
  • La Belle Dame Sans Merci
  • Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey
  • Kubla Khan
  • The Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne
  • The Charge of the Light Brigade
  • The Bells
  • Amy Foster
  • Manfred
  • The Complete Poems
  • An Elegy Written In A Country Churchyard
  • The Wreck of the Golden Mary
  • The Gaucho Martín Fierro (Martín Fierro, #1)
  • Laches
  • What Life Was Like on the Banks of the Nile: Egypt, 3050-30 BC
  • Short Stories by Gabriel García Márquez: A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings (Study Guide)
  • Oh Captain! My Captain!
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Percy Bysshe Shelley was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. He is perhaps most famous for such anthology pieces as Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind, To a Skylark, and The Masque of Anarchy. However, his major works were long visionary poems including Alastor, Adonais, The Revolt of Islam, Prometheus Unbound a ...more
More about Percy Bysshe Shelley...
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
496 likes
“And on the pedestal these words appear:

'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'

Nothing beside remains.
Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare

The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
38 likes
More quotes…