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Common Objects of Love: Moral Reflection and the Shaping of Community; The 2001 Stob Lectures

4.07  ·  Rating details ·  46 ratings  ·  7 reviews
Widely respected as one of today's wisest and most articulate Christianethicists, Oliver O'Donovan here explores the nature of personaland political behavior as it is or should be informed by Christianlove.This profound look at contemporary life focuses on how moralreflection upon common objects of love has an effect on organizedcommunity in grandest terms, political socie ...more
Hardcover, 72 pages
Published September 24th 2002 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (first published 2002)
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Dan Glover
Jan 16, 2018 rated it it was amazing
4.5 stars. No time to review this right now. Suffice to say, very very good.
W. Littlejohn
Sep 05, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Why didn't I read this sooner? Less than a hundred pages, supremely readable, yet as densely packed as anything by O'Donovan. At its core, it is a reflection on the conditions of possibility for the existence of political society, with some thoughts about the unique dangers undermining that possibility in modernity. But along the way, as usual, O'Donovan scatters profound little nuggets on everything from the fifth commandment to the meaning of secularity (see some bloggings at www.swordandploug ...more
Sam Strickland
Apr 04, 2015 rated it really liked it
O’Donovan anticipates several of his key ideas within his later book, The Ways of Judgment, here. His description, critique, and counterproposals to modern publicity at the end are unique and prescient in a world where internet communications have become more dominant since 2001.
Michael Nichols
Jul 18, 2019 rated it really liked it
A short meditation on Augustine’s famous line from Book XIX in City of God - a political community is a gathered multitude of rational beings united by common objects of love. The first two essays on love and collective action and political representation were illuminating. They could even serve as helpful introductory readings to Christian ethics, covering subjects like actions, ends, goods, affections, communication. The final essay on publicity was more esoteric than typical for O’Donovan (an ...more
Matthew Loftus
Jul 22, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Profound insights into the very basic nature of human community and our love together as the basis for politics.
Jacob Aitken
Nov 18, 2012 rated it really liked it
Not his best work. It is too short and the themes are underdeveloped. I say this as one who has praised O'Donovan's works for seven years now. He is one of the top five theologians (living) who has most influenced me. To be honest, the reader is better served by googling his Stob lectures at Calvin and taking copious notes from them.
Ethan
Apr 30, 2013 rated it liked it
Shelves: philosophy
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Oliver O'Donovan FBA FRSE (born 1945) is a scholar known for his work in the field of Christian ethics. He has also made contributions to political theology, both contemporary and historical.

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