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Yum! MmMm! Que Rico!: America's Sproutings
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Yum! MmMm! Que Rico!: America's Sproutings

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3.86  ·  Rating details ·  150 ratings  ·  46 reviews
A collection of haiku focusing on fourteen foods native to the Americas, celebrating the fun of foods as well as their origins.
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published October 1st 2007 by Lee & Low Books
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3.86  · 
Rating details
 ·  150 ratings  ·  46 reviews


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Emily
Oct 26, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Meghan
Shelves: childrens
The author rubs me a little bit the wrong way in her afterword, but the haiku are beautiful, the information on each food plant native to the Americas is interesting, and the illustrations are phenomenal. This may be my new stock gift for small children.
Vamos a Leer
Dec 01, 2015 rated it it was amazing
“Yum! MmMm! Que Rico! America’s Sproutings / Brotes de la Américas“, written by Pat Mora and illustrated by Rafael López, is available in both English and Spanish editions, although I will be reviewing the latter. In this wonderful collection of poetry, Pat Mora takes us on a gastronomic journey of the Americas through a series of fun haikus. Each poem focuses on a crop native to these continents, culminating in a full harvest of celebration and praise. The descriptions of food and cuisine along ...more
Nicki Roller
Multicultural literature/Poetry, 2013
This book provides a fun and colorful glimpse of the flavors of the Americas. This book would be great for any k-8 classroom, but especially for classrooms with ELL students!
KyLee Johnson
I was disappointed by this book. I thought that it would have more Spanish in it than it did. The illustrations were fun and engaging but that was the only thing I enjoyed about this book.
Steve Tetreault
Oct 22, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: children, poetry
I generally prefer stories to poetry, but this was a very nice introduction to foods that many American audience members might not know.
Bethe
Apr 17, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: childrens-poetry
Read this one a long time ago, love the mix of haiku and information about each food plant. Fabulously bright and lively illustrations. Great that the book is available in Spanish as well.
Marisol Herrera
Nov 24, 2016 rated it really liked it
Plot Summary:

This book is a collection of haiku poems describing fourteen foods native to the Americas. Each food is celebrated with a creative and fun haiku and illustration. Informative text boxes are also included and provide readers with interesting facts about the food.

Critical Analysis:

Through haikus, fourteen indigenous foods of the Americas are named and described. The mouth-watering adjectives used to describe the tasty foods leave readers craving America’s sproutings. Because the boo
...more
Katie
Oct 22, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Why this book? This book has BEAUTIFUL illustrations. I was instantly drawn to it. Each page has a haiku about a fruit, vegetable, or nut that is natively grown in the Americas. The book also includes information about each fruit, vegetable, or nut, and where it originated.

Genre: Poetry

Theme/ Keywords: Poetry, Haiku, Americas, Fruits and Vegetables

Characteristics of Quality: This book has beautiful, colorful illustrations that make you want to eat familiar and unfamiliar foods. Each haiku is loa
...more
Alex Martinez
May 03, 2015 rated it really liked it
Yum! MmMm! Que Rico! is a fun book of haiku poems by Pat Mora and illustrated by Rafael Lopez. It is a collection of many haikus that describes and celebrates many different foods related to the Americas. With fun and bright illustrations the poems are able to capture the tasty essence of all the foods, and it even makes your mouth water a little. Each poem really brings out the best parts of each food experience. Along with each poem is a little bit of background information of the food. This i ...more
Courtney Canino
Yum! ¡Mmmm! ¡Qué Rico!, by Pat Mora, is an information and poetry book with a lexile of 970, meaning that it would be best for middle school readers. There are no main characters in this book, but the main subject in this book are the different foods found in the Americas. The point of view of this point differed. When the author was giving background information on the food that the haiku was talking about then it was third person. When it was the actual haiku then the point of view varied from ...more
Kristina Befort
Feb 22, 2015 rated it really liked it
This book is filled with poems about different foods that are native to North and South America. What immediately drew me to this particular book at the library was the vivid illustrations, and the fact that every poem is a haiku. Haiku can be very fun to read, and even more fun to write, simply because they can be about almost anything. They are also like a puzzle, as you have to fit the right amount of syllables into each line. I would definitely use this book as a method for teaching haiku to ...more
David
Apr 26, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Pat Mora presents readers with a collection of haikus describing various activities and the enjoyment of foods, spices, and flavors specific to North, South, and Central America. Illustrations by Rafael López craftily depict children of Latino descent active and involved in the preparation and delightful consumption of everything from vanilla, chocolate, peanuts, and tomatoes. Mirroring the haikus on the left page spread of each American-native item is a paragraph describing where the objects we ...more
Fisal Ansari
Jul 09, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Age:
Grades 4-8

Genre:
Poetry Haiku

Diversity:
Native Indians of North America/Latino/Central America/South America


Illustrations:
Artwork by Rafael Lopez depicts drawings and colors that reflect earthy colors and natural colors. People are painted with natural colors according to their origins.

Personal response:
This was a good lesson about foods native to North America that were used by Native Americans, foods native to Central America and South America. It was a lesson in history and provides
...more
Linda
Along with Pat Mora’s “delicious” haiku, each double page share a paragraph about the fruit or vegetable highlighted, and a gorgeous illustration filled with López’s unique paintings in the style of Latin American murals. The book is filled with the history of food you may not know was in South America or the southern parts of North America long before Columbus arrived. In addition to excellent information, some words are also shared in Spanish, and sometimes other native languages. There are p ...more
Lindsey
Jul 11, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: latino-latina
AMERICAS AWARD (2007)

Format: Picture book
Age level: Elementary

This is a very fun and informational book about various food items that originated in the Americas. Every two pages focuses on one item. There is a beautiful, vibrant illustration spanning the two pages that usually shows a person involved with the food. Each page also has a Haiku devoted to the particular item. Some of the foods include blueberries, pecans, and papayas.

The haikus themselves are very well-written. They are able to con
...more
Meng Zhang
Jul 03, 2012 rated it it was amazing
The Lexile level for the book is AD 970L. It is for children from age 5 to 8. It is a refreshing and innovative poetry book. Food, the fun food bring to families, haiku and geography are the main ideas of the book. The illustrations are vivid and they help the readers to relate to the food. It is like the readers can taste the food in the poems while reading them. The author is brilliant and uses her “new” form of haiku to connect to the mind of a child. There are 14 kinds of food, each with a h ...more
Q_Ayana
May 11, 2011 rated it really liked it
This book is a great blend of information and poetry. It shares fourteen different foods originated in the Americas (from North to South America and in between). Each food is described using a haiku poem. Then, on the parallel page it shares background information, including place of origin and interesting facts about the crops. For young readers in the primary grades, they will enjoy the familiarity of many of the foods, and older students will enjoy the craft of the haikus and additional infor ...more
L13_melissa_prokop
This book won the 2007 Americas award and is written in haiku format with informational text as well about the food being written about. The haikus are very rich in language and the information is for older students in my opinion. My students are English language learners and had a hard time understanding the vocabulary. The illustrations make this book though. My students enjoyed the illustrations. I watched a webcast of the 2007 Americas awards and apparently this book is also written in Spani ...more
Jessica
I really loved this book--the pictures were amazing, and were reminiscent of Mexican murals. Multicultural children are portrayed throughout, and the foods featured have lovely haiku poems to describe them. It can work with a very young group, because you can just read the simple haiku and then let them look at the picture, because they will want to look at it for longer than it takes to read the poem. Each page also has a subtle paragraph or two in each corner with additional information on eac ...more
Anna
May 05, 2009 rated it it was amazing
This is such an interesting book! Not only did I learn some really neat facts about fruits, veggies, and other kinds of foods that originated in the Americas but the whole thing is written in haiku! It's really pretty amazing. Each page features a nonfiction section that tells you about the particular food (example: pecans or blueberries) and then there's a beautiful 17-syllable haiku, too! It's very creative and I could definitely see myself using this with little kids or older kids (to teach f ...more
Melanie
Sep 10, 2013 rated it really liked it
This 2007 Americas award winning book is written in Haiku format.

This is an exciting and informational book about various food items that originated in the Americas such as blueberries, corn, chocolate, and tomatoes. Each page has a Haiku devoted to the particular item and the other page is an explanation on the origin of that food and how it has been used historically.

This would be an excellent way to introduce haiku to students. While all students would be attracted to the colorful, rich, and
...more
Christina Chaidez
Sep 27, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: poetry-books
Are you hungry? If not, you will be after reading this delicious book. This haiku collection book is full of 14 mouthwatering foods that help celebrate native foods around America. The colorful illustration in the poems help bring plenty of senses to life while the written text describes the different foods. This book helps acknowledge the diversity among us while using food and giving an informational description from where each food came from.
Rosa
Apr 12, 2013 rated it liked it
This is another book that I thought would include more Spanish. Instead it’s a book of haikus that has a beautiful layout. Each food has a two page color spread that is absolutely beautiful; a short haiku on the bottom right corner of the page and a long column of text providing factual information about the food’s history. It’s a gorgeous book that describes food found all over the Americas, I just wish it had included more Spanish.
L11-Mary Utterback
Feb 16, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: latin-american
I loved this book. It is so informational about the different foods that make American culture form the times of the Native Americans. Although there is this information piece about the origins of American food there is also a wonderful assortment of Haiku poetry to explain the excitement behind these traditions. The illustrations are bright and inviting!
Sam Grace
I like Pat Mora, but I really didn't care for these poems. in fact, as a book of poetry this would get a measly 2 stars. but I really liked the short blurbs about each of the foods native to the Americas and I thought the illustrations were great. so I end up with 3 stars, which is both less and more than it really deserves.
Mary Ann
Pat Mora captures the essence of some of our favorite foods in this collection of haiku poems. These poems capture the essence of foods that have grown in the Americas for centuries, from peanuts to pecans, corn to potatoes, tomatoes to blueberries. I especially love how she celebrates the connections between growing, eating and experiencing all types of foods.
Sarah
Feb 05, 2015 rated it really liked it
Cute picture book with haiku poetry about different foods that are found in Hispanic American culture. On each page there is a poem, and a paragraph about the food. Easy introduction to Hispanic culture for children.
Jen
Aug 20, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: bilingual, pb, food-poetry
Really lovely book of Haikus with helpful text about the different foods featured in each haiku on the opposite page. Pictures are great. Rhymes are well done, except for maybe the blueberry one? I think I would maybe purchase this someday.
Karen
Jun 13, 2008 rated it liked it
Shelves: for-kids
See We Belong Together to find out why we got this book. The haiku is nice and all, but the rest of the text just didn't seem like anything Gabriel would be interested in. To be honest I don't think he liked the haiku much either, but the pictures were cute.
Michelle
Jun 23, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
A collection of haiku about foods in the Americas--chocolate, chili peppers, pumpkins, prickly pear and more. A haiku and coloful illustrations describe the food while a sidebar gives students more information about the food. Delightful!
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