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Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy

3.98  ·  Rating details ·  53 ratings  ·  9 reviews
This is a book for scholars of Western philosophy who wish to engage with Buddhist philosophy, or who simply want to extend their philosophical horizons. It is also a book for scholars of Buddhist studies who want to see how Buddhist theory articulates with contemporary philosophy. Engaging Buddhism: Why it Matters to Philosophy articulates the basic metaphysical framework ...more
Paperback, 400 pages
Published January 19th 2015 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published November 23rd 2014)
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ἀρχαῖος (arkhaîos)(RK)
Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy

This is a bit long. Read at your peril.

First, just a note to say that for the last couple of years, I have reserved a 5 Star rating for books that succeed in altering my worldview to some degree. Engaging Buddhism has done so.

Now for the disclaimer: the blurb for the book states that it "... is a book for scholars of Western philosophy who wish to engage with Buddhist philosophy, or who simply want to extend their philosophical horizons. It is al
...more
r0b
Aug 01, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Awesome second time around
Alina
May 23, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: philosophy
Garfield elucidates views in Mahayana and Yogacara Buddhism on metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, logic, phenomenology, and the self. He does this in an incredibly clear and concise manner. (He also has a fantastic style and sense of humor!) Garfield shows that the philosophical problems to which these Buddhist philosophers responded have resemblances to those found in the Western tradition. But these Buddhist philosophers start off from radically different assumptions than those in Western phil ...more
Ellison
May 26, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: buddhism
The best book I have read examining Buddhism from a western philosophical perspective. He does get carried away with subordinate clauses at times but he is packing a lot in and the best way to read this book is slowly, one sentence at a time.
Tom Burdge
Jun 08, 2020 rated it it was amazing
You won't find a better start point for engagement between Buddhism and western philosophy. Garfield brings his expertise in both to convincingly show that western philosophy will be far better off if it engages with Buddhist philosophy.

Garfield's breadth of knowledge is somewhat mind-blowing. Particularly in the western tradition, he is as comfortable talking about the continental greats (Heidegger, Husserl, Nietzsche) as the analytic giants (Wittgenstein, Kripke). Garfield's study under Tibeta
...more
Taka
Jul 06, 2016 rated it liked it
Difficult, but rewarding overall—

This is a difficult book to engage with, not just because of Garfield's liberal use of academic jargon (abstracta, relata, explanans, explanandum, sequelae, etc.), but because so much of his discussions assumes a pretty intimate knowledge of contemporary Western philosophical topics on the part of the reader. I majored in (Western) philosophy in college and although I haven't read contemporary philosophy intensively since then, I consider myself sufficiently info
...more
Aaron
Dec 24, 2018 rated it really liked it
Solid book. Does exactly what it intends to. Bit too analytic for me.
Rachael
Jul 12, 2015 rated it did not like it
To be fair, I am not a scholar of philosophy or a scholar of anything else. I had to read this book for class and found it too difficult for me to really follow what was being said.
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Amelia J E Hall
Nov 26, 2017 rated it it was ok
Decent book but really let down by poor editing/ inaccuracies in the spelling of Tibetan names and terms.
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