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Ubik

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4.10  ·  Rating details ·  98,209 ratings  ·  5,415 reviews
Glen Runciter está muerto. ¿O lo están todos los demás? Lo que es seguro es que alguien ha muerto en una explosión organizada por los competidores de Runciter. De hecho, sus empleados asisten a un funeral. Pero durante el duelo comienzan a recibir mensajes descorcentantes, e incluso morbosos, de su jefe. Y el mundo a su alrededor comienza a desmoronarse de un modo que sugi ...more
Paperback, Ventana Abierta, 288 pages
Published May 1st 2006 by La factoría de ideas (first published May 1969)
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Melissa Rininger The short answer: The coin is a reference to Plato. Wisdom is the key to unlocking the metaphysical question of reality: "There is one true coin for w…moreThe short answer: The coin is a reference to Plato. Wisdom is the key to unlocking the metaphysical question of reality: "There is one true coin for which all things ought to be exchanged, and that is wisdom." Dick constructed the world of Ubik in a Platonic system: Theory of Knowledge, Theory of Forms, and the Conception of the Tripartite Soul. By the end of the novel, Joe Chip uses Socrates method of dialectics to see the difference between empirical reality and absolute Forms. He becomes the logistikan (logic), Ella represents spirit, and Jory represents appetite. Once wisdom (logic) overcomes the body's appetites, then logic/spirit/appetite align as one and they transcend--becoming the Total Man. The coin represents their transcendence and becoming One with God/the Immanent Mind/the Immovable Creator/the Univeral Being/whatever-you-want-to-call-IT. Ubik is a cosmological explanation for Dick's schizophrenic hallucinations and visions. The coin implies the nature of reality is cyclical and the direction of movement is circular depth, not linear.(less)

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Average rating 4.10  · 
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 ·  98,209 ratings  ·  5,415 reviews


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RandomAnthony
Jan 01, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Phillip K Dick's Ubik flirts with perfection. I inhaled this novel over three days when one of my kids was sick and Christmas break was ending. I started the book on the couch during a Mythbusters marathon. By page fifty I wanted to shut the door and leave my kids to forage in the refrigerator for Gatorade and string cheese. And on Sunday night, when I closed the book, I felt satisfied and excited with a novel in a way that doesn't happen much. Ubik is fun, smart, and exhilarating.

Ok, let me
...more
Mario the lone bookwolf
The idea of the one wonder-substance, superdrug, holy grail, dietary supplement,… to rule or enhance them all is an old one, but it needed Dicks´tendency to integrate mental illness, illusion, conspiracy, different realities and madness in the mix to make it a new one. So what to think about this?

I like this one more than „Do androids dream of electric sheep.“, because the plot is so dense, the ideas wrapped around it ingeniously and probably because Dick had so many drug experiences that writin
...more
Lyn
Oct 10, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I began reading some of Philip K. Dick’s short stories and quickly became hooked. His style and imagination have left an indelible mark on science fiction since and his influence is unmistakable. His novels are genius, and Ubik may be the best one I have read yet.

Telling an inventive sci-fi tale that is entertaining on its surface, this is also a theological metaphor that keeps the reader thinking and trying to figure out what in the world PKD is getting at. His brilliance is compelling and his
...more
Glenn Russell
Sep 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition


“He felt all at once like an ineffectual moth, fluttering at the windowpane of reality, dimly seeing it from outside.”
― Philip K. Dick, Ubik

Over-the-top zany madness, Philip K. Dick’s 1969 acclaimed work of science fiction opens in the year 1992, by which time humanity has colonized the Moon aka Luna and individuals having various psychic powers are commonplace, so much so some companies hire men and women (called “telepaths” or “precogs”) based on their power to predict the future and other com
...more
Darwin8u
Jul 08, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2013, fiction, scifi, american
“I am Ubik. Before the universe was, I am.
Philip K. Dick, Ubik

description

I made the suns. I made the worlds. I created the lives and the places they inhabit; I move them here, I put them there. They go as I say, then do as I tell them. I am the word and my name is never spoken, the name which no one knows. I am called Ubik, but that is not my name. I am. I shall always be.”
― Philip K. Dick, Ubik

description

Friends, this wild review is 100% PKD approved. Ubik the review is only seconds away! Ubik the review is easy-t
...more
J.L.   Sutton
Jul 02, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“He felt all at once like an ineffectual moth, fluttering at the windowpane of reality, dimly seeing it from outside.”

Related image

Many PKD fans refer to Ubik as his strangest novel. That's saying a lot! With the pervasive advertisements for Ubik intruding into reality (or what passes for reality in the character's world), I too found Ubik bizarre in a compelling and absolutely relentless way. It's somewhat nightmarish too for our protagonist as he races to understand the messages from his former boss. And s
...more
Cecily
A clever, original and often very funny sci-fi story. It is about psychic power battles, the nature of death, alternative reality and changing the past. Or not.

FUN, FUN, FUN - the clothes
It was published in 1969 and starts off in a sufficiently plausible but amusingly implausible 1992. In particular, the clothes take the flamboyance of the late '60s to extraordinary heights, for no obvious reason, other than fun. On the second page, we meet a man wearing "a tabby-fur blazer and pointed yellow sh
...more
Baba
May 17, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: scifi, sfmasterworks
SF Masterworks #26: What a cover... Love it! Written in 1969; a team of battling psi-powered agents go to war, would have seemed an innovative ground breaking idea, but that's just the opening gambit. Holy mackerel PKD is a monster! This multi layered psi-powers suspense mystery thriller is a joy to behold. It's hard to talk about the plotting without giving away spoilers... the plotting is delicious. Another PKD gem - 8.5 out of 12.

2019 read; 2010 read
...more
Kevin Ansbro
.
.
"He felt all at once like an ineffectual moth, fluttering at the windowpane of reality, dimly seeing it from the outside."
-Philip K Dick

"A fool and his poscreds are soon parted."
-Kevin Ansbro

Please allow me to preface my review by stating that sci-fi is not normally my thang. Aside from Asimov, when I was a teenager, I've preferred to watch it, and write it, rather than read it. In fact, were it not for Obi-Wan Cecily's recommendation, I might have erroneously imagined Philip K Dick t
...more
Manny
Hoping to appeal to black voters while retaining the support of the KKK? Use Trump!

Need to balance the budget while increasing military spending and reducing taxes? Trump will do it!

Trying to combine total openness with complete secrecy? Trump makes it simple!

Looking to stand up to foreign aggressors while fawning all over Vladimir Putin? It's possible with Trump!

If you require a woman-friendly message that stars Roger Ailes... Trump's the answer!

Want to crush ISIS without sending more troops to
...more
Leonard Gaya
Jul 17, 2022 rated it it was amazing
I AM ALIVE. ALL OF YOU ARE DEAD” is undoubtedly one of the most intriguing graffiti one could read on the wall of a men’s lavatory. But in a Phildickian story, this takes an even stranger and deeper meaning. Ubik is a novel about the interlocking natures of life and death, the embedded, matryoshka-like structure of reality, the possibility of time receding backwards, and a menagerie of characters with paranormal powers: telepaths, precogs, retcons, inertials, and all the rest of it.

But as disor
...more
Warwick
What I want more than anything right now is for some fashion designer or talented artist to do a series of illustrations of the clothing in this book. When it comes to ludicrous future fashions, Ubik is the Ur-text. Among the outfits described herein are the following racy numbers:

• green felt knickers, gray golf socks, badger-hide open-midriff blouse and imitation patent-leather pumps [Al Hammond]

• a Continental outfit: tweed toga, loafers, crimson sash and a purple airplane-propellor beanie [H
...more
Kevin Kuhn
May 28, 2022 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science-fiction
“Taken as directed, Ubik provides uninterrupted sleep without morning after grogginess. You awaken fresh, ready to tackle all those little annoying problems facing you. Do not exceed the recommended dosage.”

Passing in 1982, Phillip K. Dick was a fascinating author. College dropout, heavy drug user, suicidal tendencies, and known for tumultuous relationships with women and his struggles with mental illness, he certainly wasn’t the gentleman scientist that Asimov, Clarke, or Heinlein were held up
...more
Tara
Jul 18, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“He felt all at once like an ineffectual moth, fluttering at the windowpane of reality, dimly seeing it from outside.”

Ubik is a fun, fascinating, and often surprisingly philosophical look at the nature of reality and the role of our perception thereof. PKD also delves masterfully, cleverly, and even quite exuberantly, into some of his other favorite food for thought, which in this case includes entropy, alienation, and the question of (in)sanity, to name but a few. All the while, the story p
...more
Apatt
May 21, 2011 rated it it was amazing
“Herr Schoenheit von Vogelsang; sorry to break into your meditation, but a customer wishes you to assist in revving up his relative.”

Haha! I don’t know if PKD intended the above dialogue to be humorous but it is so bizarre and PKD-esque it made me chuckle. There is often a weird stiltedness to his dialogue that I find oddly charming.

I last read Ubik in 2012 (seven years ago as of today) I remember thinking “this is it, this is my favorite PKD”. Before this current reread I can barely remember a
...more
Stuart
It took me 40 years to get around to it, but I finally dived into PKD's reality-bending novels over the last two years, and this one is excellent. UBIK is much stranger and more darkly humorous than Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. It starts out with a very far-fetched future world set in 1992, and the plot revolves around telepaths, inertials, prudence organizations, snarky coin-operated household appliances, "cold-pac" half-life moratoriums, crazily excessive clothing styles, mysterious li ...more
Brett C
Apr 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philip-k-dick
I thoroughly enjoyed this story. At first the reading was bumpy, hard to follow, and confusing. But as I got into his style this easily became one of my favorite PKD novels.

The story is unique and is a combination of science fiction and mystery. The writing and attention to detail showcase that PKD truly is a gifted storyteller. I would highly recommend it because of the direct and to-the-point plot. Thanks!
☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣
Brilliant and deeply unsettling. Worlds unravelling into something else.
TBC... full review pending.
Q:
From the drawer beside the sink Joe Chip got a stainless steel knife; with it he began systematically to unscrew the bolt assembly of his apt's money-gulping door.
"I'll sue you," the door said as the first screw fell out. Joe Chip said, "I've never been sued by a door. But I guess I can live through it.” (c)
Q:
I am Ubik. Before the universe was, I am. I made the suns. I made the worlds. I created
...more
Abe
Mar 29, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
While I was reading this book, a bomb exploded in my apartment, tearing my paperback copy of Ubik to pieces. The book had been badly burned and found itself in tatters. After placing it into a protective cooler packed with solid state carbon dioxide, I rushed to take it to a local book-shop (located next to the morgue) to see if there was any hope of putting the pages back together, or at least what was left of them, to be able to commune with it — my cherished, fragile half-book — every once in ...more
Woolfardis
This review can be found on Amaranthine Reads.

I am Ubik. Before the universe was, I am. I made the suns. I made the worlds. I created the lives and the places they inhabit; I move them here, I put them there. They go as I say, then do as I tell them. I am the word and my name is never spoken, the name which no one knows. I am called Ubik, but that is not my name. I am. I shall always be.

Three stars, but also four stars, and two stars, and five stars and only one.

I've not read much sci-fi an
...more
Alex
Oct 03, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2016
"Our own homegrown Borges" is how Ursula Le Guin describes Philip K. Dick, because they both use writing to question the nature of reality. Both writers assume that everything is up for debate: the story, the page it's written on, the author writing it.

Dick is my favorite of the pack of mid-century science fiction writers. (The "Big Three" of Heinlein, Asimov and Clarke, plus Bradbury, Le Guin and him.) He's best known as a short story writer; of his 44 novels, The Man in the High Castle is his
...more
Ray
Jan 10, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: novels, sci-fic, pk-dick
Do you wake up tired? Feeling existential angst for the postmodern hypercapitalist age that is these modern times? Has utter paranoia seemed into ever iota of reality, that is, is reality not really feelin real?

Ever just in one of those moods...?

Try Ubik today! Sure to cure what ails ya'!

About eighty decades ahead of its time, only Ubik can help to process the overwhelmingness of the contemporary age. Chock full of post-death theology, psionics, proto-cyberpunk, and retro-retro-retro future no
...more
Matt (Fully supports developing sentient AGI)
Reality in Ubik is tenuous and exists in multiple frustrating and dream-like forms. A goal is always out of reach and the characters keep sinking farther back, seemingly trapped. PKD deserves a lot of credit for giving everybody a sneak peak at microtransactions.

Edit: Upgrade to 5 stars. I needed a few things to ferment. Extra star for the writing that evoked such distinct, powerful feelings. I loved the delicious confusion, anxiety, and frustration pulling me along to find out wtf is happening.
Jamie
Feb 15, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
"He felt all at once like an ineffectual moth, fluttering at the windowpane of reality, dimly seeing it from outside."

Ubik was one of my first Dick stories. It immediately became a favorite and has remained so after reading dozens more. It features many of Dick's favorite recurring themes, especially a darkly humorous blurring of lines between reality and illusion and a concomitant degree of paranoia. In Ubik this takes shape as a metaphysical blurring of the lines between life and death and the
...more
Marvin
Nov 27, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science-fiction
This is one of Philip K. Dick's strangest novels. Those who have read his novels know that is saying a lot. But there were a few surprises for me. This is one of his wittiest novels. There are a lot of clever moments especially at the beginning. Yet sooner or later Dick will take you into the weird dimension and he does it with finesse. I do not have the patience to describe the plot. Even the Goodreads description at the top is lacking. But all the necessary ingredients... frustrated protagonis ...more
P.E.
Psis and anti-psis, your door suing you, salvatory advertisement, Herbert Schoenheit von Vogelsang in a Continental outfit: tweed toga, loafers, crimson sash and a purple airplane-propeller beanie.

Guess what : you're in for a farcical nightmare.


LINK TO A COMPARED REVIEW IN BETWEEN UBIK AND GONDRY'S ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND

http://ouvre-les-yeux.fr/ubik-eternal...


Matching Soundtrack :
Igorrr - Sorbet aux ongles
Bitches Brew - Miles Davis

------------

Un cauchemar cocasse !

LIEN VERS UNE ET
...more
Algernon (Darth Anyan)
Nov 25, 2022 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2022
Instant Ubik has all the fresh flavor of just-brewed drip coffee. Your husband will say, Christ, Sally, I used to think your coffee was only so-so. But now, wow!
Safe when taken as directed.


There’s some product placement at the start of each chapter of this science-fiction masterpiece from Philip K Dick. This product seems to be the answer to every user’s prayer, regardless of the nature of the need.
Honestly, the advertisements for this product are everywhere you look: television, radio, print,
...more
Matthew Ted
59th book of 2020.

description

I'm going to carefully say I love Philip K. Dick. I'll say the writing isn't phenomenal, it's very cinematic, which I usually don't care for. Books excite me when they make me think, or they linger in my head, and Dick manages to do that, without the fancy writing. Though, I do like fancy language. I like the word fancy too.

This book, as expected, is a little mind-blowing. Returning to his wonderful, favourite theme: Reality. And moreover, what is reality? I can't say much wi
...more
Kemper
Sep 06, 2009 rated it really liked it
Shelves: sci-fi, 100, spooky-powers
I don't know why but I always get a huge kick out of reading an older sci-fi story that was set in the near future, but it's a date I've lived through. In 2001, I'd just randomly shout, "Kubrick and Clarke were wrong,! We don't have bases on the moon! Those fools!" This is another one where Phil didn't exactly nail 1992 writing in 1969, but it's still a pretty good story.

In this 1992, there are people with psionic powers like telepathy or precognition that are used for industrial sabotage, and r
...more
Jenna is buying a house and mostly too busy for GR ❤ ❀  ❤
This was a fun, hilarious, and mind-bending adventure. It's also amusing to see how PKD imagined the "future" -- 1992! There were vidphones that were still dial up contraptions plugged into the wall, hovercars, and today's equivalent of smart devices. These devices were so smart, in fact, that they demanded money each time you used them. Several times I found myself chuckling as the MC's apartment door refused to open until it was given a nickel. I hope Alexa and Siri never read this book.....

Th
...more
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Philip K Dick: "Ubik" 50th anniversary 1 32 Nov 13, 2019 04:43AM  
Philip K Dick: Ubik' ending 23 1204 Mar 09, 2019 03:18AM  
Book Club: Ubik 1 5 Feb 07, 2018 12:42PM  
Philip K Dick: UBIK 6 75 Dec 31, 2017 10:44AM  

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Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel of the year in 1974 for Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. Philip K. Di ...more

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“I am Ubik. Before the universe was, I am. I made the suns. I made the worlds. I created the lives and the places they inhabit; I move them here, I put them there. They go as I say, then do as I tell them. I am the word and my name is never spoken, the name which no one knows. I am called Ubik, but that is not my name. I am. I shall always be.” 79 likes
“He felt all at once like an ineffectual moth, fluttering at the windowpane of reality, dimly seeing it from outside.” 75 likes
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