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March: Book Two

(March #2)

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4.50  ·  Rating details ·  14,804 ratings  ·  1,709 reviews
The #1 New York Times bestselling series continues! Congressman John Lewis, an American icon and one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, continues his award-winning graphic novel trilogy with co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell, inspired by a 1950s comic book that helped prepare his own generation to join the struggle. Now, March brings the lessons o ...more
Paperback, 192 pages
Published January 20th 2015 by Top Shelf Productions (first published January 13th 2015)
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Trish Book Three recently won the 2016 National Book Award for Youth!

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Bill  Kerwin
Nov 30, 2016 rated it really liked it

This second volume in the graphic biography of civil rights stalwart John Lewis begins with the Freedom Riders and Parchman Farm and ends with the March on Washington and the fatal bombing of Birmingham’s Sixteenth Avenue Baptist Church. Just as in the first volume, the stark black-and-white illustrations complement the somber and often disturbing events, but now, as the atmosphere becomes darker and more intense, the illustrations become more cinematic, more ominous.

In addition to the powerful
...more
Diane
Dec 06, 2016 rated it really liked it
Wow, book two in the March series was even more powerful than book one. The March graphic novels are based on Congressman John Lewis' memories of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. This second volume focuses on the Freedom Riders in 1961, and also on the March on Washington in August 1963. That was the day when Dr. Martin Luther King made his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. Of all the people who spoke that day, only Lewis is still alive.

I was so inspired after reading this book that I watc
...more
Calista
I simply cannot imagine having to face the brutality these people faced in the south. The ugliness on display in places like AL, MS and TN is horrific. The men and women using non-violence as a protest are amazing people and this story has power. I admit, I didn't know much of who John Lewis was until this series. This is his account of the civil rights revolution. A revolution that never completely finished. People want to think it's fair and equal, but yet it's not. Our system is still stacked ...more
Carol
". . . mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors."


Donovan



The year was 1961, and the American South was racist as fuck. At movie theaters, they were turned away or beaten. In cafeterias, subjected to water buckets, hoses, darkness, and poisonous fumigation. In buses and terminals, sometimes beaten or burned to death. In the streets, full blown riots, sometimes to the death. All at the approval of white police and government.

It breaks my heart to read about the history of American hatred and the dehumanization of African-Americans. More than a half cen
...more
Tatiana
Jan 28, 2017 rated it really liked it
Oh, I see, this is the great America he keeps talking about.
Eve
Jan 03, 2017 rated it really liked it
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"In those moments, Dr. King made plain all of our hopes, our aspirations...everything we sought through the beatings and the blood, through the triumphs and the failures, everything we dared to imagine about a NEW America, a BETTER America..."
Trina (Between Chapters)
This series should be required reading in school. Please read this.
Monica
I remain impressed. This is a spectacular set of graphic novels and the John Lewis story is worth knowing and understanding. He is a national treasure.

5 Stars

Read the dead tree version.
Sam Quixote
Jun 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: best-comics-2015
Congressman John Lewis continues his autobiography in March: Book Two which picks up in November 1960 as a 20 year-old Lewis’ involvement in the growing student movement deepens.

The main focus in the second book is the Freedom Rides. Boynton v. Virginia (1960) outlawed segregation and racial discrimination on buses and in bus terminals so the idea behind the Freedom Riders was to test the decision by sending small groups of integrated students (black and white) on buses in the south. The results
...more
Julie
Apr 07, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: graphic
Book Two of March gets grisly.

The nonviolent beginnings of the Nashville “sit-ins” depicted in March, Book One, have now attracted national attention and opposition, and violence is erupting all over the South.

The Freedom Riders board buses in the South in the 1960s, to fight for the right to be recognized as human, but what is human anyway, if a human can turn a fire hose on children at a nonviolent protest and then set a pack of killer police dogs on them?

As far as I'm concerned, there's beh
...more
Trish
Book 2 in the March series about the life and work of civil rights activist John Lewis is absolutely propulsive in telling the story of racial prejudice in the southern United States in the early 1960s. As with Book 1, the early frames describe a cold day in January 2009 when all of Washington, D.C. and many more gathered in front of the Capitol Building for the inauguration of President Barack Obama.

The joyous scenes in 2009 are interleaved with the contrasting history some 50-odd years earli
...more
Teresa
Jun 22, 2018 rated it really liked it
Last month I visited Birmingham, Alabama: the park where children marched in a peaceful demonstration against segregation, where they were arrested, sprayed by firehoses and threatened with police batons and attack-dogs; the church that was bombed, killing four little girls; the fairly new Civil Rights Institute that memorializes these events (also covered in this volume) and more. I am in awe of what these people did and how they achieved their goals. I don’t think I could be that strong.

A tre
...more
Char
Just like with The Complete Maus, (a graphic novel about the Holocaust), I learned a lot about the civil rights movement that I do not remember learning in school.

I knew about the Freedom Rides and the Lunch Counter Sit-ins, but I didn't know about children getting hit with fire hoses or the repeated beatings and jailings of the peaceful protesters.

Starting and ending with the swearing in of President Obama, I can't imagine what that must feel like to John Lewis. Starting life not being able t
...more
Barbara (The Bibliophage)
This is a history lesson, a heartbreak, and a primer on resistance. The drawings are starkly black and white, which is both symbolic and deeply affecting. I'm forever grateful to John Lewis and his team of creators for filling in the missing lessons in my education's curriculum. Shame on schools if they don't teach these kids about events, like mine didn't.
Lata
Dec 01, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Sad, painful, horrifying.
Madalyn (Novel Ink)
Jul 26, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: own-physical
These graphic novels are just brilliant. I mean, what a perfect medium for John Lewis's story. I am endlessly proud to call this man my representative in Congress.
Sesana
Dec 21, 2014 rated it really liked it
Every bit as good as the first volume. This volume includes the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington, which makes parts honestly terrifying to read, even this long after the actual events.
David Schaafsma
Jan 22, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: graphic-history
This is the second volume of three by Lewis, a significant civil rights leader and member of congress and drawn by Nate Powell, that sort of ramps up the energy and action and emotion and gets us to significant events in civil rights history, told quickly but deftly and with energy and without sugarcoating about what happened. This one focuses on the Freedom Rides, Lewis's incarceration in Mississippi's Parchman Prison, and 1963's March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. It ends with the Birmin ...more
leynes
Apr 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: black-writers
I said everything I wanted to say in regards to the story as a whole and the art style in my review of March: Book One, so let's jump straight ahead to the things that March: Book Two taught me:

1) Due to his work with SNCC and other Civil Rights organizations John Lewis grew estranged from his family. He still saw his family over the summer, but Nashville and the growing Nashville student movement became his home.

2) The non-violent sit-ins were met with more and more aggressive responses. Once
...more
Meredith
Mar 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I'm learning so much about the Civil Rights Movement from these graphic novels! I knew the name "Freedom Riders," though to read what they really went through was heartbreaking, but so important. And having some more background on the March on Washington was really interesting, too. Dr. MLK's speech still runs true today, but we've still got a long ways to go.
Karen Witzler
Sep 06, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: graphic-novels
The movement matures. The Six Leaders emerge. A portal into American Hell opens up in a Birmingham church and swallows four maidens. Lewis makes sure to give us the names of other youngsters murdered in the streets in the ensuing madness. Honestly it is like reading a sort of American Iliad.
Eric
It is 2016 and recent events, incidents, and tragedies that have taken place this year in this country that has never quite lived up to its' myth, nearly 8 years after the inauguration of its' first black President (which serves as the overarching climax for this 3 book graphic memoir about John Lewis' activism during the Civil Rights Movement), makes me urge you to read March: Book Two.

If you want a traditional review and overview of this graphic memoir there are many on Goodreads that do a mo
...more
Ije the Devourer of Books
Apr 14, 2015 rated it it was amazing
This volume continues the story of the civil rights movement, focusing on the work of the Nashville Student Movement and others. The story is told by Congressman John Lewis who was a leader within the civil rights movement and the youngest of the 'Big Six'.

After the success of the Nashville sit-in campaigns (see vol 1) the students continue their efforts by organising freedom rides from Nashville to Birmingham, a stronghold of segregation. The way the story is shown through comic form is excelle
...more
Sebastien
Oct 24, 2016 rated it really liked it
Gut-wrenching. Heart-rending. These comics are hammering home to me the darkest aspects of what people in the Civil Rights Movement faced. I think I understood this in the abstract, but when I read about it, and see it visualized, it becomes even more starkly real and frightening. I am both inspired and frightened by what humanity is capable of.

It's a wonderful series so far. Much of the history I had some grasp of, but I have learned other aspects and facts which I was completely in the dark ab
...more
Alex Sarll
Following Congressman Lewis' early career from the Freedom Rides to the March on Washington, this is if anything even more powerful than the first volume, and the unflinching depiction of the response by the racist authorities even more harrowing. Though I did find something especially inspiring in all the controversy over Lewis' climactic speech, which you assume is going to have its teeth pulled by the various objectors to this word or that line. Yet when you compare the original draft include ...more
Marta
Apr 16, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Riveting, raw capturing of the freedom rides, and the organization of the March on Washington. The bravery of the freedom riders was incredible - they knew they are likely to get beaten, jailed, might even be killed - yet they went to the heart of the segregationist South - Birmingham, AL; Jackson, MS. My biggest shock was the terrible violence, anger displayed by white racist mobs, the police, the attitude of the governors in those states.

The graphic medium is used perfectly to heighten the dr
...more
Matthew
Check out my reviews: https://dancinginth3dark.wordpress.co...

In the previous volume we got a small glimpse of America in the 1950s through early 1960s. We get major insight into John Lewis upbringing and his journey towards working with Dr. King and the Civil Rights movement. For the most part the first volume was an introduction and setting up the groundwork for this graphic novel. We as the readers get to see the sad reality of how our country was reacting towards these nonviolent protests.

Af
...more
Raina
I'm late to the party on this one because I was waiting for them to come out with one comprehensive volume. This may or may not have happened yet, but the library doesn't have it if it does exist. I started to feel an urgency to read it, and since all three volumes are out, decided that was good enough. I'll post the same review on all three volumes.

John Lewis recounts the civil rights movement from his first-hand perspective. All three volumes are framed with the narrative of Lewis remembering
...more
Rebecca
May 23, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Another incredible book in the March series. Sometimes I have a hard time connecting to the reality of history if I'm not experiencing it, and these books put the reader in the experience of Civil Rights activism, emotionally, visually, and viscerally. If you've ever wondered how to affect social change, if you've ever wondered about the history of police brutality toward blacks in America, if you've ever wondered why it's such a big deal to have a black president -- this history will enlighten ...more
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John Robert Lewis is the U.S. Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district, serving since 1987 and is the dean of the Georgia congressional delegation. He was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement and chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), playing a key role in the struggle to end segregation. He is a member of the Democratic Party and is one of the m ...more

Other books in the series

March (4 books)
  • March: Book One (March, #1)
  • March: Book Three (March, #3)
  • March: 30 Postcards to Make Change and Good Trouble
“We are involved now in a serious revolution. This nation is still a place of cheap political leaders who build their careers on immoral compromises and ally themselves with open forms of political, economic and social exploitation. What political leader here can stand up and say, "My party is the party of principles?” 1 likes
“By the force of our demands, our determination and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated South into a thousand pieces and put them back together in the image of God and democracy.” 1 likes
More quotes…