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Mothers Who Murder

3.54  ·  Rating details ·  59 ratings  ·  12 reviews
All of these women are notorious, but are all of them deadly?Child murder: A social taboo and one of the most abhorrent acts most of us can imagine. Meet the women found guilty of murdering their own children. They represent some of the most hated women in Australia. The infamous list includes psychologically damaged, sometimes deranged, women on the edge. But, as we will ...more
Kindle Edition, 303 pages
Published August 1st 2014 by Random House Australia
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Average rating 3.54  · 
Rating details
 ·  59 ratings  ·  12 reviews


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Josh
Jul 13, 2014 rated it really liked it
Many readers would hold a macabre curiosity attached to the topical nature of this book if not a passing interest by virtue of the unspeakable act implicit in the title. The very thought of a maternal parent undertaking such a heinous crime in murdering their child is incomprehensible to many (myself included) yet, there are a sinister few who have done this. Dr Xanthe Mallett looks at a number of infamous cases and provides an objective interpretation and overview of the particulars that led to ...more
Patricia
May 26, 2015 rated it did not like it
My alarm bells should have rung when I saw that the author had used the title "Dr" on the cover. Many writers have a PhD (including me) but don't emblazon their book covers with it unless on a self-help book and they have acquired a doctorate from a post office box in Texas. Mallett continues her self-indulgence by boasting about her qualifications and even worse, speaking to the readers as if they are morons. It is not necessary to explain the meaning of "supine", nor the many other common medi ...more
Majanka
Oct 07, 2014 rated it really liked it
Book Review originally published here: http://www.iheartreading.net/reviews/...

Mothers Who Murder focuses on some of Australia’s most notorious murder cases. Killing a child is probably the worst thing imaginable. Some of the mothers featured in this book are wrongly accused, and have eventually been cleared, as in the case for Lindy Chamberlain, whose baby got kidnapped by a dingo.

Then there are the cases that aren’t as straightforward, where evidence points in two different directions, and can be interpreted bot
...more
Emily Webb
Aug 16, 2014 rated it liked it
This book covered most of the Australian cases of mothers who have murdered their children. Shocking subject and difficult to comprehend. This book also details some cases of miscarriages of justice and some overseas cases too. I read a lot of true crime so I was familiar with most of the cases and therefore I flicked through the book, rather than read it in detail but it's very thorough. A really excellent first book by Xanthe Mallett. A longer review is here. http://truecrimereader.com/2014/08/mo...
Helen
Aug 24, 2014 rated it it was ok
Although I enjoyed the gruesome but unfortunate true stories that are in this book. I found the writing repetitive and drawn out. I understand that when presenting information like this, there has to be an overall picture given before reading the full story, but it was repeated wholly and in each chapter.
Patricia
Feb 08, 2019 rated it liked it
Shelves: true-crime
I came across this book while sitting next to the author at a crime writers' festival and couldn't wait to read it. The author, a forensic scientist, analyses many cases with which we will only be familiar through media reports and does so in an unemotional and factual way until the final chapter where she reflects on the effect writing this book had on her. I was hoping she would take a feminist approach to these cases but she travels a rather impartial road through the legal minefield. The add ...more
A Reader's Heaven
(I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.)

Child murder: A social taboo and one of the most abhorrent acts most of us can imagine. Meet the women found guilty of murdering their own children. They represent some of the most hated women in Australia. The infamous list includes psychologically damaged, sometimes deranged, women on the edge. But, as we will see, accused doesn't always mean guilty.
Among the cases covered is that of Kathleen Folbigg,/>
Child
...more
Peter
Aug 15, 2014 rated it liked it
A pretty good read, this book provides fascinating detail on each of the cases it covers. Perhaps the title is somewhat misleading since most of the Australian cases seem to be women who are either definitely innocent (Lindy Chamberlain), or may be (Keli Lane, Kathleen Folbigg), or at least there is not enough evidence to be able to conclude they are murderers. But I suppose sometimes a lurid title helps sales. The main reason I was interested in reading it was that I had a problem with the verd ...more
Pam Thomas
Sep 14, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Found this a most interesting read, why do women murder those who mean so much to them, their children who they have carried and nurtured through their lives. Each of the cases in the book have already taken place and the reader has to read each one to see that there were a series of behaviour patterns, women who were either abused of damaged as children, sexually, physically and emotionally., How in one case a miscarriage of justice of Lindy Chamberlain whose baby was taken by dingos and how to ...more
Denise MacDonald
Sep 27, 2014 rated it liked it
Recommends it for: those interested in psychology
Shelves: arc-s
This book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

I found the subject of this book fascinating. Each chapter covered a different criminal case involving the death of a child or children allegedly by the hand of their mother. The author discusses each case, presents facts, trail transcripts and medical reports. She provides alternate theories and lots of background information regarding the child and the parents. There is a lot of discussion around medic
...more
Keryn
Dec 07, 2015 rated it liked it
Well written, clinical and factual. It certainly gives an informed and expert opinion. I knew about post natal depression but nothing about post natal psychosis. Sad and depressing but real life. I did not quite finish the book, it was very drawn out. It does make you question our justice system and where do prosecutors 'find' their so called experts who seemed to provide questionable opinions.
Not to say there is a clear conclusion to be drawn on guilt or non guilt (except for the obvious,
...more
Suzanne
Aug 23, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: not-uni-reading
Very good book written with the facts. Was also great to meet Xanthe the other night at UNE in Parramatta
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