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Ask Me

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3.76  ·  Rating details ·  780 ratings  ·  184 reviews
Ask me what I like?

What do you like?

A father and daughter walk through their neighborhood, brimming with questions as they explore their world. With so many things to enjoy, and so many ways to ask—and talk—about them, it's a snapshot of an ordinaryday in a world that's anything but. This story is a heartwarming and inviting picture book with a tenderly written story by
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Hardcover, 40 pages
Published July 14th 2015 by HMH Books for Young Readers (first published June 1st 2015)
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Average rating 3.76  · 
Rating details
 ·  780 ratings  ·  184 reviews


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Philip
Jan 14, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
Illustrations: 4.5
Story: 4.5

I love positive representation of male caregivers! A lot of people don't realize how uncommon that is. I get a lot of well-meaning comments about "babysitting" my kid or "playing Mr. Mom" when we're out during the day lol. In this story daughter asks LOTS of questions, as little girls sometimes do, and dad listens patiently and encouragingly. Kind of wordy, but Suzy Lee's illustrations are natural and expressive as always.

Posted in Mr. Philip's Library
David Schaafsma
Jan 27, 2016 rated it really liked it
I read this because I started reading Suzy Lee's smart and breezy and quirky wordless picture books like Wave or Zoo, both so great, and just wanted to check out more from someone I like. I see at a glance that statistically, at least, GR readers like this less than others. I prefer her solo works but this is also very good, the story of a father and young daughter who begins:

Ask me what I like?

What do you like?

So this one obviously has words, Bernard Waber's words, and way more words than Lee
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Anne
Jul 16, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Ask me what I like.

I really liked this book. It perfectly captures the way some little girls pepper their parents with questions about all sorts of things. I also really the sweet relationship between this father and daughter. The text changes color depending on which of them is speaking, which I also really liked.

Ask me what I love.

I love Suzy Lee's colored pencil illustrations. I've seen only one other of her books and loved that one's illustrations too. The colors are so vibrant.
Beckyt
Dec 25, 2015 rated it it was amazing
I love love love this book! So sweet! Other reviewers have pointed out the special relationship of the father and daughter and the sweet ordinariness of their outing.
The illustrations blew me away! Gorgeous! Suzy Lee has a new fan....
Jackie Ostrowicki
May 10, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Sweet father and daughter book. I had no idea this was published posthumously by the author of Lyle the Crocodile. The daughter asks her father to ask her what she likes---she prattles on; her father (obviously amused and affectionate) gives brief answers and keeps her talking with an easy give and take.

The girl’s words appear in black type and the father’s in dark blue, so readers know who is speaking despite the untagged dialogue and lack of quotation marks.

Suzy Lee's illustrations always
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Laura Harrison
Mar 28, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Just wonderful. Mr. Waber would have loved the illustrations. A+++++
V.A. Trafton
May 08, 2018 rated it really liked it
On a day out together a father and daughter spend time walking and sort of play a game of ask me what I like and I'll ask you what you like. Bonding book and getting to know each other.
Christine
Suggested Grade Levels: Pre-K through 2nd Grade
Genre: Contemporary Realistic Fiction
Themes: Family, Growing-Up
Awards: Kirks Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2015

This is a soft and cheerful story of a little girl and her father spending a fall day together at the park. Throughout the book the little girl has her father ask her questions about what she likes and she responds back to him telling him the things she likes such as the geese in the sky, riding on horses, ice cream cones, etc. The
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Jane
Dec 22, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
Oh how I love this book. Growing up I spent a lot of time with my father (my mother tended to work evenings and weekends), and I’m always delighted to come across picture books featuring children and fathers or other male caregivers (mothers seem to dominate the picture book world).

I love Suzy Lee, and I love her illustrations in this book. The simple, lovely pencil illustrations with their rich, vibrant washes of colour just warm my heart.

I love the text. I was a nonstop chatterbox as a child,
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Kate
Jul 19, 2015 rated it liked it
Recommends it for: preschool-kindergarten
Best thing about this is that it features a father and daughter. So nice to see a dad! Pencil illustrations are filled with color and warmth as the father and daughter go for a walk and finally end up at bedtime. The text is their conversation as the girl tells her father what she likes...after telling him to ask the questions she wants to answer. Free flowing, realistic conversation with a young child. A quiet story of an everyday event, the story shows the loving relationship of parent and ...more
Andréa
Feb 02, 2015 rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-books, arc
Cute back-and-forth dialogue picture book of a father and daughter's day at the park. The father's and daughter's lines are printed in different color inks, to better differentiate, except I found the two colors to be a bit too similar to easily tell apart. On a few pages, I had to really concentrate to know which was which.

I like that the story features a father/daughter pair, instead of the typical father/son or mother/child pairings. The illustrations are lovely color pencil illustrations in
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Rebecca
If ever there was a more perfect book to express one person witnessing another's life -- truly one of the best things an adult can do for a child, or one human for another -- I haven't seen it. Suzy Lee, one of the best illustrators working today, brings beloved Bernard Waber's words to life with blazing colored pencil images and delicate line work. Pair with Sidewalk Flowers for another father/daughter feelings-fest.
SamZ
Sep 24, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: father-s-day, fall, owned
This book is so beautiful and perfect and wonderful! I love the concept of the daddy/daughter date, and the way the daddy listens to his little girl prattle on and on about all the things she likes. The drawings are so gorgeous and complement the simplicity of this story so perfectly. I know I'm gushing, but basically I read this at the library and immediately ordered a copy for myself on Amazon. Such a beautiful book!
Bill Landau
Feb 02, 2016 rated it it was amazing
I love everything about this book. The illustrations are just plain beautiful. The text is so authentic. And the story is heartfelt. It reminds me so much of days spent wandering and exploring with my two daughters...and it makes me miss that part of my life, now that they are all grown up. Loved it.
Allison
I loved this book. It is one of my favorite thing to ask kids about things, I often learn a lot.
Jennifer
Jul 30, 2015 rated it liked it
Father-daughter book. Lovely illustrations.
Tahani
May 01, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Beautiful illustrations.
Wonderful relationship between a daughter and her dad.
Perfect picture book.
HueL
Sep 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: favorites
If there is 4.5 I would give this book a 4.5. A small issue of this book, also seen in other comments is how to read it. it may ale the kids confusing reading with one tone. A second issue for this book is universality. Th experience of this father may not apply to other parents or teachers. So they get into a bit awkward situation by reading all the texts to kids. I. General, the idea is great, it is refreshing and a nice to way to start communication with kids.

For the illustration part, Suzy
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Lara Olivia
Mar 13, 2019 rated it really liked it
Ask Me is a wonderfully realistic fiction children's book that highlights a relationship between a girl and a male figure that is close to her. I really loved that the text never depicted whether it was a father and daughter, uncle and niece, etc. It only states that it is a father and daughter pair on the cover flap. This is really amazing because it just allows more children to be able to relate to the book. The illustrations are fiery red and blazing orange because it is set in the fall when ...more
K
Jan 04, 2018 rated it really liked it
All children should be blessed with a father like this. I was nervous about sharing the book with children. What if they don't have a father with this amount of time? Patience? Joy in companionship? Appreciation of nature? Would the book make a child feel sad if they didn't get this level of attention from their Dad? I don't have the answer to that. So, I will assume instead, that this gorgeous model of parenting can only be an uplifting example to familes who read the book together.

I used this
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Kristine Hansen
Jul 24, 2017 rated it really liked it
A question and answer book that takes you on a walk with father and daughter through a carefully thought out conversation that shows the infinite patience of the father and the sweet and open curiosity of the child in regards to the world around her.

While the format didn't do much for me, I think it can work with a couple things in mind:

1. Read with your child allowing them to answer some of the questions and inviting discussion about their answers. This might just be the perfect way to get them
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Nancy
Feb 10, 2019 rated it it was ok
Shelves: picture-books
Yes! for the art, which carries the story forward so lightly, and is so gorgeous and engaging.

Alas, I kept tripping over the format -- and wished so much it could work. It seems so close. I love the idea of a conversation, and this one feels authentic. But I couldn't quite keep straight who was speaking. And perhaps the biggest obstacle: I couldn't imagine reading this out loud -- which you'd have to, because this feels best to share with a 5 year old?

Also, I hunger for more. This feels
...more
Megan Forbes
Sep 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Though my topic is on single-parent families, this is the only one I’ve come across so far featuring a single dad, much less a single dad with a daughter. I think that this aspect is so important to see since the stereotypical single parent is female. Breaking this stereotype is a really big deal, which is why I am putting it on my shelf! The illustrations are bright and eye-catching, and certainly enhance and depict what is happening in the story. Children can easily understand what is ...more
Zoraida Rivera Morales
This book received great reviews. The art is colorful and imaginative. It portrays something that kids love to do: ask questions. In this book the girl tells her father which questions to ask and then she answers them, too! I have mixed feelings with this book. Although it's childlike, I wished that somewhere in the book the action would have changed. The book is for kids from four to eight years old, according to Publisher's Weekly. I think it's more appropiate for the four to six range. I ...more
Ashley Lambert-Maberly
This one's quite sweet. The illustrations are charming, and it's such a touching evocation of an ordinary afternoon with a father (or perhaps really nice uncle, like me) and child, and the kind of conversation one has.

(Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).
Micha O'Connor
May 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
Parents will certainly relate as a father answers his daughters’ seemingly endless questions about all they encounter during a walk in the park and beyond. Lee’s pencil illustrations in its primary color palette match the simple dialogue Waber (of Lyle the Crocodile) created and published two years after his death.
Denise
Apr 02, 2019 rated it really liked it
Lee's illustrations steal the show in this picture book! Waber structures the text into a question and response between an adult and a child, with the child often prompting the adult to ask her specific questions. The illustrations rarely seem to relate directly to the text, but provide grounding in space and time for the atemporal conversation.
Suzanne Kunz Williams
I love the little girls asks for what she needs and wants. And I love how responsive the father is. I think that sometimes everyone loves to talk and it is a big gift to listen!

**Talking points - what do you love and why? Who do you love best to talk to and why?
Luisa Knight
Aug 02, 2017 rated it it was ok
The story was fun, I'm just not entirely sold on the style by which it's conveyed. Perhaps if you read the book with two different voices - one for the father and one for the daughter - it would be better? Otherwise I can see children getting lost and becoming disengaged.

Ages 4+
Jessica
Oct 26, 2019 rated it really liked it
Beautiful illustrations!
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Bernard Waber was the youngest in a creative family. At age 8, he ushered in a movie theater after school, so he often saw only the last ten minutes of a movie. He made a game of inventing beginnings and middles. When he returned from a tour of duty in World War II, he entered the Philadelphia College of Art. With a diploma and a new wife, he traveled to New York City, where he began working for ...more
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