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Flowers in Salt: The Beginnings of Feminist Consciousness in Modern Japan
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Flowers in Salt: The Beginnings of Feminist Consciousness in Modern Japan

3.97  ·  Rating details ·  38 ratings  ·  7 reviews
This is the first book to examine the changing roles of women in Japan during the four decades following the Meiji Restoration of 1868, a period of sweeping political, social, and economic change. The book concentrates on those Japanese women who were outspoken critics of their society and the roles women were assigned in it, but also assesses the contributions women made ...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published June 1st 1983 by Stanford University Press
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Richard
Jul 05, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: japan-related
I found out about this book via my perusal of a bibliography of another book on women in Japan which I had read. I am glad I was able to get it via my local public library because it was quite well done.

Sievers did a great job of weaving the political and social history of Japan from the mid 19th century into the first two decades of the 20th with interesting depictions of individual women who struggled to gain the freedom and rights that (a small number of) men had in the country. Despite ther
...more
Arlian
May 17, 2015 rated it really liked it
I would give this book 5 stars, but I had to take a star (and maybe a star and a half?) off for inaccuracies.

Let me give you a direct quote written about the "High Treason Incident":
"After a secret trial, conducted with great dispatch, twelve socialists, including Koutoku Shuusui and Kanno Suga were hanged."

Kanno Suga was an anarchist, not a socialist and the "High Treason Incident" was a case of primarily anarchists being hanged. Sievers also mislabels Osugi Sakae as a Socialist. I am providi
...more
Alexandra Eremia
Jan 28, 2016 rated it it was amazing
"If it is true that men are better than women because they are stronger, why aren't our sumo wrestlers in the government?"
Kishida Toshiko, 19th Century Japanese Feminist
...more
Leifer
Nov 12, 2010 rated it liked it
A very interesting intro, though it skips between general history and biography in a slightly uninteresting way. Sievers gets mad props from me for putting this attempt together. The writing is sympathetic, nuanced, and careful in a way that i really appreciate (considering the subject matter and the author's status). It would have been easy to screw this up.

I would like to see how this connected to art more. Tough to find an anthology on visual art and feminist consciousness...
...more
Adam
May 15, 2016 rated it really liked it
Kanna Suga (1906): "Rise up, women! Wake up! As in the struggle workers are engaged in against capitalists to break down the class system, our demands for freedom and equality with men will not be women easily just because we will it; they will not be won if we do not raise our voices, if no blood is shed." That is frickin' tough. I need to read more of her stuff. She seems to have bled righteousness. ...more
Chelsea Szendi
May 05, 2010 rated it liked it
Shelves: japan
Siever's application of the idea that in anxious times of rapid social change, women are forces into the role of the keepers of tradition plays out very nicely here. This is an important book because it offers a corrective to so many histories of modern Japan in which men are the only actors. However, its analytic mode of "feminist consciousness" seems a little tired and outdated. ...more
Laura
Actually a really interesting "educational" book! ...more
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