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One Candle

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4.11  ·  Rating details ·  203 Ratings  ·  49 Reviews
For one family the traditional Hanukkah celebration has a deeper meaning. Amidst the food and the festivities, Grandma and Great-Aunt Rose begin their story -- the one they tell each year. They pass on to each generation a tale of perseverance during the darkest hours of the Holocaust, and the strength it took to continue to honor Hanukkah in the only way they could. Their ...more
Paperback, 40 pages
Published September 21st 2004 by HarperCollins (first published 2002)
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(showing 1-30)
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Lisa Vegan
Nov 26, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Hanukkah reading; introduction to the Holocaust
Recommended to Lisa by: Abigail A.
This is a wonderful book for reading during Hanukkah. It would also be a good choice to introduce Hanukkah and/or the Holocaust to school classes, perhaps ideally in third or fourth grade, but a much wider age range could be appropriate.

It’s a terrific multigenerational family story. The girl narrator’s voice is wonderful. She tells about her extended family getting together for a dinner the first night of Hanukkah. Her grandmother and great aunt were in Buchenwald concentration camp together du
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Ina
Nov 08, 2007 rated it it was amazing
This is one of the loveliest children's books I have ever held in my hands. These people and their story come right off the page. The book is luminous.
Luann
This brought tears to my eyes, even the second time I read it. The illustrations are lovely and simply perfect for the story. This would be a great way to introduce students to the Holocaust.
 (NS) Maria
Nov 01, 2009 rated it really liked it
When I taught third grade I always thought what if the topic of Holocaust came up in the history book? How would I introduce it? I thought discussing the holocaust would be a difficult topic to discuss with elementary students. As I began to read this book, I thought it would be a great introduction about the holocaust and Hanukah. This story has made me think how important is to remember those who suffered and died during the holocaust.

This story begins with a family celebrating Hanukkah by re
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Sarah Landwehr
Oct 31, 2011 rated it really liked it
“One Candle" is a book about religious culture by Eve Bunting. The text details the story of a family celebrating Hanukkah. As a part of their Hanukkah celebration, the grandma tells the story of her time spent working with her sister, Rose, in the Nazi camps during World War II. The two sisters secretly stole a potato, butter, and matches so that they could make one candle to light for Hanukkah. In secrecy, the women celebrated their Jewish holiday and a bit of hope was renewed within them. Yea ...more
Stephanie Matteo
Jan 10, 2016 rated it it was amazing
This book was interesting because i love how the book has to do with both Hanukkah and the Holocaust. They told a story about how the Jews used steal potatoes and lite them for Hanukkah. It was a really good book I would recommend it!
Nicholas Arcolesse
Jan 11, 2016 rated it really liked it
This is a good book because it actually gives a personal experience about the Holocaust and not documents about the Holocaust.
Sophia Arredondo
Jan 10, 2016 rated it really liked it
Slightly confusing, but it could've been the way the reader read. However, this book was very cute for children and explained some of the cons of being Jewish during World War 2.
Maite Velasquez
Nov 06, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Review # 6
The story is about a family coming together for Hanukah. After dinner, the grandmother sits down and starts skinning and making a hole in a potato while she tells the story that she tells every year at that time. Both sisters had been in a Jewish camp during World War Two when they were teenagers. And were assigned to work in the kitchen. As Hanukah drew closer, they started stealing some butter, and matches and finally a potato. Back at their barrack, they used the potato to create a
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Jimmy Reyes
Mar 17, 2015 rated it it was amazing
A holiday for many families includes celebration of traditions and a gathering of loved ones who all share in these customs and enjoy being together during this special time of year. The importance of Hanukkah for this family goes beyond coming together for another year and the story as told by grandma and great aunt Rose is the real message of triumph and of the importance of remembering the value of life and traditions during this Hanukkah.
Eve Bunting brings the reader to the family table and
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Heidi
Feb 21, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: cc-cycle-2
As the family gathers to celebrate Hanukkah, a young girl listens to her grandmother and aunt tell their annual story about their experience in a concentration camp during WWII.
Kayla Fallis
Oct 24, 2012 rated it really liked it
This is a story about a Jewish family that is gathering together to celebrate Hanukkah. For this family, this holiday means much more than to the normal family because of the story that Grandma and Great Aunt Rose share every year. This story that they tell is about the hardships that they faced when in Germany being held at Camp Buchenwald during the Holocaust. As this story is told, Grandma carves out the inside of a potato. She talks about while at the camp she and Great Aunt Rose worked in t ...more
Paula
Apr 29, 2012 rated it it was amazing
How does one introduce a topic as difficult as the Holocaust to elementary students? This book by Eve Bunting will light the way.

Eve Bunting has never shied away from difficult topics. In One Candle, Bunting pairs with Wendy Popp to create a gentle, but heart rending book. In this story the Hanukkah story of courage and preserverance is interrelated with the story of Grandma and Great-Aunt Rose. The annual family tradition is a story of determination and endurance against the blackness of hate.

T
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Ruth Lyons
Mar 07, 2012 rated it it was amazing
This book is about a family who is gathered for Hanukkah. The story contains a story with in that revolves around a potato. The story is about how the grandmother and her sister were in a concentration camp in Germany and made a candle for Hanukkah out of a thread, a potato, and some margerine. It is about why the grandmother every year makes a candle out of a potato to remember the bad time and those who suffered along side of her and how that one small candle lifted their spirits.
The illustrat
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Mary Ann
Dec 11, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 3rd, 4th, holidays, hanukkah
This story soft, powerful tale is very evocative for me. A family gathers together to celebrate Hanukkah, and Grandma brings a potato as she does every year. When she was younger, the narrator thought this potato was to make latkes. But now she realizes that it's so that Grandma and Great-Aunt Rose can tell the story of surviving the Holocaust. In a concentration camp, they stole a potato at tremendous risk, and lit the Hanukkah candle using a bit of margerine and a thread. As the young girl tod ...more
Kristine
The first night of Hanukkah is different for one family, as they gather to listen to grandma retell of her experience as a young girl in a concentration camp where she stole a potato and margarine to create one Hanukkah candle. The young narrator concludes that her grandmother recounts the story every year as a reminder to be strong during the bad times and cherish the good while remembering those lost.
Life Between Coffee Spoons
The first night of Hanukkah is different for one family, as they gather to listen to grandma retell of her experience as a young girl in a concentration camp where she stole a potato and margarine to create one Hanukkah candle. The young narrator concludes that her grandmother recounts the story every year as a reminder to be strong during the bad times and cherish the good while remembering those lost.
Lana Clifton
This is a beautiful, realistic fiction portraying a family's traditional celebration of Hanukkah. A grandma and great auntie live to tell of their family's survival during the Holocaust. Their bellies once starved, are now gratefully full. Their story details one family's endurance and preservation of cultural heritage. This is a great seasonal text, and also a resource for integrating social studies units in 3rd-5th grade classrooms.
Kristine Cook
The first night of Hanukkah is different for one family, as they gather to listen to grandma retell of her experience as a young girl in a concentration camp where she stole a potato and margarine to create one Hanukkah candle. The young narrator concludes that her grandmother recounts the story every year as a reminder to be strong during the bad times and cherish the good while remembering those lost.
Dolly
Nov 28, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: parents reading with their children
This is an amazing story about a family who comes together for Hanukkah and every year, the younger family members become acquainted with their Grandmother and Great-Aunt's story about survival in a concentration camp during WWII. It's a touching and inspiring story about hope, faith and the importance of passing down memories from one generation to the next. We really loved this story.
Malissa
Feb 11, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: children-s
Read this one in January because it's one of our Shelby County Reads selections for younger kids. I thought it was a good book relating to the Holocaust for very young children. It touches on the "bad times" and the importance of remembering and of family without really going into details. That's something that's pretty hard to do considering the subject matter.
Korri
Every year a family gathers together for Hanukkah and listens as Grandma and Great-Aunt Rose tell how one candle in the barracks of Buchenwald lifted their spirits. Set amidst food and festivities, beautifully rendered in pastels, the story is about "being strong in the bad time and remembering it in the good time."
Theresa
This content of this book might be hard for younger children to understand. When I read it to a group of third graders there were many questions about the what and why of the Holocaust. On the other hand, a simple book to open discussion about the Holocaust, World War II, traditions, and the Jewish people.
Christina
Apr 13, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Powerful, powerful book! A grandmother and great-aunt retell the story of their survival in a concentration camp to their Jewish family during the holiday of Hanukkah. Students will be aided to try to imagine a life different from their own as the little girl listening to her grandmother's story is going through that same process.
Kim Bogren Owen
Nov 16, 2016 rated it it was amazing
This book shares the story of a family's Hannukah celebrations and history, including their struggle through the Holocaust. Young children will be able to relate to the pain of that time while honoring the incredible courage and resilience of those who lived through the Holocaust. Talk about how humans in even the most difficult times can find happiness and show courage.
Nick Brennan
Jan 13, 2016 rated it liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Morgan-Britney Hawksley
Oct 29, 2012 rated it it was amazing
This book is powerful in a subtle way. Every time I read it to the children I have to pause every little bit. It is so important to remember how we are free to celebrate this holiday, without persecution. Seventy years ago it would have been so much different.
Karrie
Dec 25, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Absolutely amazing book. My second graders were enthralled by the message in this book, and very touched by the experiences of Jewish Holocaust survivors. Great book to read during the holidays to increase awareness and compassion of our differences and similarities as human beings.
Nikki
Jan 26, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: childrens-lit
This story is told from the point of view of a young, modern girl whose grandmother survived the Holocaust and retells her story each Hanukkah. Another good way to introduce the Holocaust to children.
Jill
Oct 30, 2011 rated it really liked it
Lovely story, beautiful illustrations. Good for family story times. It is centered on Hanukkah, but it is really about one family's history and the way that they keep the memory of their past alive. Any family could relate to this story.
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19126
Also known as Evelyn Bolton and A.E. Bunting.

Anne Evelyn Bunting, better known as Eve Bunting, is an author with more than 250 books. Her books are diverse in age groups, from picture books to chapter books, and topic, ranging from Thanksgiving to riots in Los Angeles. Eve Bunting has won several awards for her works.

Bunting went to school in Ireland and grew up with storytelling. In Ireland, “The
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