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Aesop's Fables

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4.05  ·  Rating details ·  114,210 ratings  ·  2,043 reviews
Paperback, 306 pages
Published April 10th 2003 by Oxford University Press (first published -560)
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Mel Foster Because Goodreads is wonky, this question comes up for multiple editions. Aesop's Fables don't exactly have a clear literary line. If your collection …moreBecause Goodreads is wonky, this question comes up for multiple editions. Aesop's Fables don't exactly have a clear literary line. If your collection has less than 700+ fables, then it is not all of them. I saw this question because I read the Joseph Jacobs edition. There are many popular editions with many more tales.(less)
Michael Sluck Jupiter was the king of the Roman gods; he was the Roman form of the god Zeus.

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Ahmad Sharabiani
1001. Aesop’s Fables = The Aesopica, Aesopus

Aesop's Fables, or the Aesopica, is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece between 620 and 564 BC. Of diverse origins, the stories associated with his name have descended to modern times through a number of sources and continue to be reinterpreted in different verbal registers and in popular as well as artistic media.

One bright morning as the Fox was following his sharp nose through th
...more
James
How often in life these little fables come up and we forget their original (or semi-original) source. Thousands of years old... parables told over and over again, then written down. What do they really mean, you can ask yourself these questions over and over again and have a different answer each time.

Take the "Tortoise and the Hare" as an example: Is it always true that slow and steady wins the race. Is that really what the story says? Could it be a broad theory that is subject to individual o
...more
Sean Barrs
Aesop wrote many intelligent fables in here, and some are real life lessons. One of the most famous, and also the one I take the most from, is The Hare and the Tortoise.

We all know the story and the maxim: slow and steady wins the race. Being arrogant and fast isn’t all that. I remember reading this at school for the first time when I was around five to six years old, and somehow, it stuck with me. I always take the tortoise approach in life whether it be writing essays or training for marathon
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Riku Sayuj
Feb 22, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Recommended to Riku by: Socrates

AESOP'S ECHOES

It is amazing how so many popular references and common senses are found here. Aesop finds his echoes throughout the high flying philosophers and through the earthy grandmothers, not only engrafted into the literature of the civilized world, but familiar as household words in daily conversation of peoples, across borders. It is all pervading. And to top it off, such great pleasure too.

Wisdom, and simplicity, and entertainment - through unforgettable stories - what more could be
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Jan-Maat
Once upon a time, long ago and far away, all things and beings were not only conscious, but also able to communicate in the same language, an earthenware pot could talk to a bronze kettle, the fresh rivers to the salty sea, animals on two or four legs, hairy or feathered nattered and prattled together.

This is the world of Aesop. Key to it is that mutual understanding does not arise from the fact that all things can understand each other, no, that point is just where the fun begins. And above all
...more
Manny
Dec 23, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Everyone
I was looking for a Christmas present for my nephew the other day when I noticed an edition of Aesop's Fables in Blackwells. I had a copy myself when I was a kid, and it was one of my favourite books. I can't guess how many times I read it.

Thinking about it now, it surprises me to realise how fresh and up-to-date it still feels. Most of the stuff from that period is starting to slip away; most people don't read the Bible any more, or Homer, or Euripides, or Seneca. Obviously, they're still ackno
...more
Fabian
Mar 11, 2010 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I must admit that at this time some of these tales fell flat & are as antiquarian as... Carriages? Shepherds?

But still, some of them are cynical enough to strike my fancy, and most of them end with a little innocent critter dying and learning a mistake way too late--all so that we can benefit. There is misogyny, racism, class-ism... the works. Its deletion of this from the "1001 Books" List doesn't affect me (or you), really.

My favorites include the one about the bat who denies his classificatio
...more
Jason Koivu
Sep 21, 2016 rated it really liked it
These moral lessons were my bible.

...when I wasn't made to learn my bible as a kid.

The other day I realized I didn't know all of Aesop's Fables. Certainly I've read a few and heard many more, but I'd never sat down and read the whole thing. So I rectified that.

Now I can see why some of the lesser known fables are lesser known. Not every one of these often-anthropomorphic tales of animals wise and woeful is a winner. None are terrible, but every once in a while one of them doesn't quite resinate.
...more
Manny
My colleague S, with whom I'm currently doing a project involving Italian, lent me this book so that I could improve my shaky grasp of her language. I was pleased to find that I could understand quite a lot of it! The high point was discovering an Aesop's Fable that I hadn't previously come across:

The Frogs and the Well

Some frogs lived happily in a puddle. Then summer arrived; as one hot day succeeded another, the puddle shrank until it disappeared altogether. The frogs had no choice but to seek
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Fran
Dec 21, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: fantasy
This is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece. These stories, while at times naive at times strange, filled many of my summers, I as read them out loud for my grandmother while she was sewing or painting or doing one of the many things she loved to do with her hands.

Originally belonging to the oral tradition, the fables were collected only three centuries after Aesop's death. The stories are focused on teaching moral lessons ab
...more
Michael Finocchiaro
The world of fables for the west really originated with the slave Aesop and this marvellous collection of stories. In France, La Fontaine would probably never have existed had Aesop not existed. The fairy tales of Grimm and Andersson similarly drew inspiration from Aesop. The most famous of course is the eternal Tortoise and the Hare, but don't stop there as there are amazing tales here with philosophical and moral messages that transcend the ages.
Rebecca McNutt
If there's one book that deserves a classic status, it's Aesop's Fables. With hidden moral values among wit, humor, fantasy and animals, Aesop created some of the most clever scenarios and stories of all time.
Ahmed  Ejaz
Dec 01, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2016, short-stories
I think this is the book I can call a REAL masterpiece.

OVERVIEW
This book contains Fables. Each fable is different from the other and contains different moral. Author uses animals to convey his message. There are very few Fables in which he uses humans. But I didn't mind that fact. I just wanted a lesson.
And I must praise author for such a great comparison between humans and animals. He has used an appropriate animal for a particular human characteristic.
Overall this book contains almost e
...more
Rahul Matthew
Dec 07, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I really love these timeless tales taught by Animals!!:)
Katie Lumsden
An odd, interesting and kind of charming read.
Karina
Mar 27, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Love all the stories. Reading them to my kids and then asking them the morals as they see it. I know they don't understand it all but I hope it plants a seed in them to be kinder, empathetic people and not letting others abuse this kindness. Lots of witty and self evaluation stories told in animal form. Short and sweet with lots of wisdom and mental strength.
Bettie
Description: The fables of Aesop have become one of the most enduring traditions of European culture, ever since they were first written down nearly two millennia ago. Aesop was reputedly a tongue-tied slave who miraculously received the power of speech; From his legendary storytelling came the collections of prose and verse fables scattered throughout Greek and Roman literature. First published in English by Caxton in 1484, the fables and their morals continue to charm modern readers: Who does ...more
Eadweard
"The Goat and the Donkey

A man kept a goat and a donkey. The goat became jealous of the donkey, because it was so well fed. So she said to him:
‘What with turning the millstone and all the burdens you carry, your life is just a torment without end.’
She advised him to pretend to have epilepsy and to fall into a hole in order to get some rest. The donkey followed her advice, fell down and was badly bruised all over. His master went to get the vet and asked him for a remedy for these injuries. The ve
...more
Phoenix2
Aug 03, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: classics
Read it when I was a kid. Nice and witty.
Theresa
I'm not sure what I was expecting to get out of reading these, and while some of them were amusing some were just weird.

Most of these stories have a moral to them, like The Tortoise and the Hare, but others just explained why things are the way they are. Then you had stories that just consisted of a woman smelling an old wine canteen. A lot of the stories were repetitive, which is probably why I started losing interest towards the end. How many stories about a wolf trying to lure a poor lamb or
...more
Marquise
This was the only book quite appropriate for my young age that I read as a child, a precious edition with lots of drawings by one of the best book illustrators, Arthur Rackham, which to date is still much loved by me. I have that old copy with me even now, relatively well preserved.
Amy
Oct 03, 2017 rated it liked it
I think maybe this just isn't a book you want to read all at once. It is quite amazing that these stories are 3000 years old and the lessons still hold. It's just that many are similar and after a dozen or so it gets kind of tedious to read.
Laura
Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

INTRODUCTION


Aesop embodies an epigram not uncommon in human history; his fame is all the more deserved because he never deserved it. The firm foundations of common sense, the shrewd shots at uncommon sense, that characterise all the Fables, belong not him but to humanity. In the earliest human history whatever is authentic is universal: and whatever is universal is anonymous. In such cases there is always some central man who had first the trouble of
...more
Afkham
Jun 03, 2017 rated it really liked it
Aesop's most influential fable, very short tales told by different creatures with a wise piece of advice or a moral result in the end.
The appealing point is not only it applies for our routine and every day life but also it got its roots deep in humanity and civilized society of all the times and areas. Most of them stories I've heard or read about as a child or even been told by illiterate elderlies.
Eric Boot
I translated parts of these for my Greek lessons, and it was pretty interesting :) I didn't read all of them but I think the biggest share.
Shyam
Oct 27, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
You are ignorant and lacking in curiosity, and have failed to go over your Aesop —Aristophanes, The Birds
__________
There is a whole population . . . running all over the place excitedly, occupied without any true occupation, huffing and puffing at frivolous pursuits, and making much out of nothing. They are an annoyance to each other and utterly despised by everyone else. Yet I would like to try to correct this crowd, if possible, by means of a true story: it is one worth listening to.

'I'm not g
...more
Timothy Urges
It’s interesting how many of these fables are based on stereotypes and misconceptions.
Tea
Sep 04, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I like this book some of the fables were interesting some were boring.
But they make you think and I think any book that makes you think, is worth reading.
Lauren Schumacher
Apr 25, 2013 rated it really liked it
I am a student of fairy tales. I have multiple editions of Grimms'. I have read everything ever written by Hans Christian Anderson. I had never read Aesop's Fables, though, understanding them from a young age to be folksy and devoid of conflict. But I have tasted regret often lately for my precocious judgements, so when this collection of several hundred tales caught my eye, I decided to give them a try. I'm so very glad I did, for each of these fables is a revelation. In their simplicity, these ...more
Arun Divakar
Jan 12, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Throughout your childhood you would have heard the variants of these tales which give you those little nuggets of wisdom. The morals of these tales are what other authors try to explain through books that may be as big as 600 plus pages ! Aesop needs a few sentences to make some of the most profound observations on human nature. His characters are varied between almost every known man,beast,bird, tree & god of the Greek era.

These are immortal tales and will remain so for eons to come. The moment
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447 followers
Aesop (/ˈiːsɒp/ ee-sop; Ancient Greek: Αἴσωπος, Aisōpos, c. 620–564 BCE) was an Ancient Greek fabulist or story teller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains uncertain and (if they ever existed) no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling trad ...more

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