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Thanksgiving in the White House
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Thanksgiving in the White House

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3.46  ·  Rating details ·  57 Ratings  ·  13 Reviews
President Abraham Lincoln's youngest son, Tad, is very fond of Jack the turkey. He has tamed him and taught him tricks, and the bird follows him all around the White House yard. But Jack was meant to be the main dish of the first official Thanksgiving celebration.

Tad doesn't want his pet to be eaten for dinner, not even for a day as special as Thanksgiving! Can he convinc
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Hardcover, 32 pages
Published September 1st 2003 by Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
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Andrea Hussey
Nov 24, 2016 rated it liked it
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Casandria
A great example of good historical fiction picture books for kids. Tad Lincoln was a boy when his father declared Thanksgiving to be a national holiday. He grew very attached to Jack the Turkey and was dismayed to find out the turkey was meant for their dinner!
Heather
Nov 25, 2016 rated it liked it
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Kaye
Some adventures of Tad Lincoln before the first National Day of Thanksgiving in 1863. Kids enjoyed learning that Tad was able to get a Presidential pardon for his Turkey Jack. Also some civil war references. Good historical fiction for 3rd- 5th graders.
Stefanie Burns
Nov 06, 2016 rated it really liked it
The story is based on some facts, though the story is fiction. It shows a brief glimpse of life in the White House when the first Thanksgiving is declared a national holiday by Abraham Lincoln. The story is told through the eyes of Tad, Lincoln's youngest son. He was known for creating mischief. In this story, he charges people tolls to talk to his father, interferes with those attempting to meet with his father, and intervening in the Thanksgiving feast. His antics are shown to come from a cari ...more
Maria
This book would be a great story to share on or around Thanksgiving. It does say that not all of it is completely true but most of it is. It would be a great story to share to show how Thanksgiving came about.
Jessica Simmons
Nov 20, 2016 rated it it was amazing
I really liked this book! I thought it was really cute! I also liked that some of what was written in this book was true! It has good morals for everyone to hear.
Lee Huntington
Oct 26, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Funny and engaging!
Beth
Nov 18, 2015 rated it really liked it
fun story about the first official national day of thanksgiving, and how President Lincoln's son saves a turkey from execution.
Heather
Oct 24, 2011 rated it liked it
A fun historical-fiction book centering on Abraham Lincoln's son, Tad, and the celebration of the first official Thanksgiving holiday.
Nicol
Apr 02, 2009 rated it really liked it
This was a sweet book which told some of the things that Tad Lincoln did and how his tender heart brought joy to the White House during an extremely challenging time.
Tracie
Jan 16, 2013 rated it liked it
President Abraham Lincoln's son convinces his father to pardon the turkey slated to be eaten at Thanksgiving dinner. Inspired by true events.
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“About the Story

Not all the details in this story are true. The times some events occurred have been changed, and the conversations are made up. Most of the things Tad Lincoln did in this story reportedly happened, including saving Jack the turkey and bombarding the Cabinet Room door with his toy cannon. Tad really was determined to raise money to help wounded soldiers and did persuade his father to pardon a woman’s husband so he wouldn’t be shot. Although Tad’s antics often annoyed his father’s staff, most agreed he had a big heart and a special way with animals. Once he even hitched goats to a chair and ran them through the White House, upsetting a gathering of dignified ladies. Nothing was too surprising when it came to Tad.
Although several presidents had declared occasional days of thanksgiving, none had ever officially made it a national holiday. Abraham Lincoln finally did so with his Proclamation of Thanksgiving on October 3, 1863.”
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“About the Civil War

The bloodiest war ever fought on United States soil was the Civil War. Brother fought against brother, father against son. The nation had split in two. Eleven states in the South left the Union in 1861 and formed the Confederacy, determined to govern themselves and hold slaves. Abraham Lincoln and the federal government did not agree. On April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter in South Carolina was attacked by Confederate forces. The Civil War had begun. When it finally ended four years later with a Union victory, more than 620,000 men and boys had been killed, and over 50,000 returned home as amputees.”
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