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Cold War, Cool Medium: Television, McCarthyism, and American Culture
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Cold War, Cool Medium: Television, McCarthyism, and American Culture (Film and Culture)

3.6  ·  Rating details ·  77 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
Conventional wisdom holds that television was a co-conspirator in the repressions of Cold War America, that it was a facilitator to the blacklist and handmaiden to McCarthyism. But Thomas Doherty argues that, through the influence of television, America actually became a more open and tolerant place. Although many books have been written about this period, "Cold War, Cool ...more
Paperback, 320 pages
Published March 10th 2005 by Columbia University Press (first published January 1st 2003)
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Rick Roseberry
Jun 08, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
With an innovative assessment of the McCarthy phenomenon and the inculcation of television into the American psyche, Thomas Doherty, in his tome Cold War, Cool Medium: Television, McCarthyism, and American Culture, cautions the reader that “television then was a different medium than television later, or now, and broadcast over a different cultural atmosphere.” (viii) He examines the emergence of television as a “full-scale incursion into American culture,” and contends, “The Cold War and the co ...more
Ashley
Dec 07, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: students, journalists
Recommended to Ashley by: professor
Shelves: what-i-study
This is a fascinating look at how the Cold War, McCarthyism, and Television were deeply intertwined. The chapter on Edward R. Murrow is an excellent counter point to the laudatory movie "Good Night and Good Luck." Although the book is not a "page turner" I found it hard to put down and talked about it to almost anyone I met.

Well worth a read.
Jim Willse
Jul 17, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Superb research and lively writing. Fascinating look back at the linkage between Cold War events and the growth of television. Particularly resonant in the Time of Trump, he also being a creature of television.
Sharone
Sep 21, 2009 rated it did not like it
Interesting information clothed in florid, loathsome prose. Almost unbearable.
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