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De jongen op het houten kistje
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De jongen op het houten kistje

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4.36  ·  Rating details ·  16,211 ratings  ·  2,397 reviews
Leon Leyson is pas tien jaar oud als de nazi’s Polen binnenvallen en hij en zijn familie naar het getto van Krakau worden gedeporteerd. Leon komt in concentratiekamp Plaszow terecht, waar hij de dodelijke grilligheid van kampcommandant Amon Goeth moet zien te overleven. Tot hij door Oskar Schindler wordt opgemerkt en in diens fabriek aan het werk kan, ook al is hij zo klei ...more
Paperback, 224 pages
Published April 15th 2014 by Boekerij (first published August 27th 2013)
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❤Erin❤ It is a very good book, you should read it some time.
AMY It is a heavy book for kids to read. I think if it was a very mature youngster who could talk it over with an adult they might get through it ok. I…moreIt is a heavy book for kids to read. I think if it was a very mature youngster who could talk it over with an adult they might get through it ok. I would say it can get pretty rough and I had trouble as an adult getting my head around all of the different scenes sometimes - so painful to hear. It will definitely haunt you...(less)
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Average rating 4.36  · 
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 ·  16,211 ratings  ·  2,397 reviews


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Kelly
Sep 25, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
First let me apologize. I'm not very good at reviewing. I can't make it all fancy and professional sounding. I can only write what I thought. And what I thought was this:
This was an inspiring and amazing tale of a young boy, caught up in the Holocaust, who not only survived by the grace of God, but went on to make a wonderful life for himself. He suffered horrendous pain during that time, but he didn't let his past define him. He chose to use his past to make him stronger.
I should know be
...more
Betsy
Sep 08, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
One Sentence Review: Absolutely beautiful and in a perfect world would replace The Boy in the Striped Pajamas as the customary middle grade WWII Holocaust title.
Barb Middleton
Finding excellent introductory books on the Holocaust for young readers is not as easy as it sounds even with the plethora of choices. More often than not they are too brutal for 5th or 6th graders or they don't give enough background to understand the setting and attitudes of people. Other times they are too one-sided presenting the Germans as one-dimensional villains omitting those that resisted the Nazi racist ideology. This story is a balanced account of Jewish attitudes that came from their ...more
Kristy K
Mar 18, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An amazing, heartbreaking memoir by the youngest boy on Schindler’s list. In the same vein as Wiesel’s Night, it’ll make you cry more than once. Highly recommend.
Tania
Feb 21, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: memoir
The memoir of Leon Leyson, entitled The Boy on the Wooden Box, follows the profoundly moving true story of his survival through the Holocaust. Leyson was just 10-years-old when the Germans invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto. He began working in Schindler’s factory when he was 13.
This memoir reinforces many things I already knew about the Holocaust: the terrible hunger, isolation, loneliness, degradation and terror experienced by the Jews. I did not know th
...more
Jessaka
Aug 08, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
As a Jewish boy living in Poland when the Nazis were just beginning to take power, Leon and his friends used to play down by the river. They would grab hold of a low hanging branch and swing across the river and then drop down onto the ground. When he was a little older, his family had moved to another city where he learned how to get free rides on streetcars by getting on when the conductor was at the other end, and getting off when he saw him coming down the aisle for tickets and then getting ...more
Hannah Mustafa
Nov 21, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is my first time reading a memoir about someone’s experience during the Holocaust. It’s terrifying to read Leon’s experience as he was only ten when the incident happened. With grit, perseverance and incredible luck, he and his family survived because of Oskar Schindler by being in his famous list. The story of Leon Leyson is worth to tell to the world.
Joyce Yattoni
I've studied the atrocities of The Holocaust for many years and every time I pick up a new book on the topic I continue to learn more. I never heard of the Plaszow camp. The living conditions were just as vile if not worse than Auschwitz. Thankfully, Oskar Schindler, a German citizen, did all he could do to save some of the persecuted. Oskar Schindler wanted to take down walls, not build them. While reading this book I was overcome with profound sadness that human beings could treat one another ...more
Diane Mueller
Dec 04, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Amazing! Leon Leyson was the youngest survivor on Schnidler's list. His parents and 3 of his 5 siblings survived Nazi Germany because of Schnidler's. Leon tells his story of survival and how without Schnidler they would not of survived. The paragraph in the book when Leon explains how he can't understand how the Nazi's hated the Jews so sadly reminds me of the way people talk about the Mexicans, the Blacks, and many others in our country today.
"We were a single detested group...the exact opposi
...more
Charlie
Mar 31, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, ww11, memoir
I've read many stories/books about the Holocaust, however, this is a must read for those that have any interest in this subject.
Leon Leyson was on Shindler's list. He and his family became friends with Oskar Shindler, a German, that attempted to save as many Jewish lives as possible thru his factories that he owned.
This story has its' Highs and Lows as one would expect. After Leon and his family members were liberated they came to America and that is another story. A great story.
This boo
...more
Ângela


“A hero is an ordinary human being who does “the best of things in the worst of times.”

This book is powerful.

A powerful testimony, wrote in first person by a Jew who went through so many terrible things, but manage to survive.
This book is also a thank you to Oskar Schindler, whom had an important role in saving this boy and his family.

“One time when we were in Płaszów a guard struck my mother on the side of her head with a wood plank. The blow permanently shattered her eardrum. She said that for the rest/>“Oneis
...more
Maggie Li
Dec 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I learned that the Jews had to go through a lot more than death camps and discrimination. This book is amazing and sad.
Rachel
Sep 29, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I read this so one of my students could have an alternative to Night, and it is definitely a good choice. Leyson’s story is heartbreaking and written in a way that younger readers can understand the terrible things he and others went through during the Holocaust.

I also liked how he talked about life after he was liberated. That does not often happen in these stories, and he was such an inspiring person.
Max
Mar 06, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I really enjoyed this book even though it was a very easy read. It was heart warming and a book I would recommend to everyone. The plot was very simple and relatable. Also it takes a perspective that is not seen very often as a person that survived a concentration camp. So it is a good book that I would recommend because of its different perspective and easiness to read.
Shannon
Aug 14, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Simply put, this book was wonderful. A biography for children written by a man who experienced WW2 as a persecuted Jewish child. For the most part, it's what you would generally expect from such a book, telling of horrific days, weeks, years in ghettos and camps but what makes it a good one for children/early teens is that it carries a message of hope and humanity too. Instead of a story where the author is the only surviving person that they knew from that time, this is a story of survival. All b ...more
Miriam
Jul 28, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Leyson was the youngest child in his family and possibly the youngest of the hundreds of Jews rescued by Oskar Schindler.

The contrasts between his happy childhood in the loving embrace of his parents and siblings and their increasing desperation to survive the tightening snare of Nazi persecution are conveyed with simplicity and directness. His descriptions of life in the ghetto and camps are like many we've read before, but what he tells of the conditions in Schindler's factory, the small but
...more
Lauren Waters
Sep 19, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Reading this broke my heart. Going into this memoir, I knew there would be sorrow, inhumanity and death, but the cruelties inflicted upon the Jewish and other populations of people during WWII are beyond horrific. It is difficult to read yet immensely important.

With that said, the strength and courage people found within themselves to survive or fight back against the Nazi Regime is remarkable. The small acts of kindness and moments of hope are true testimets to the humane spirit. I
...more
Yelim
Sep 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Before I read this book, I thought that all the Germans hated the Jewish people. But after reading this book, I knew that there were some people who respected everyone and tried to help the Jewish people.
Amy Hustead
May 26, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I loved this book! It's a straightforward memoir, perfectly suited for YA readers. I was impressed with the brilliant descriptions of such horrific events. Truly a moving piece of work and a must read for those interested in the holocaust.
Mel
Apr 17, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another remarkable Holocaust survivor story. “Who lives who dies who tells your story.”
Kate
Dec 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Should be required reading for everyone. What a sad but well told story of one boy and his family in the holocaust. It is a true story and there are notes at the end from his wife and children. The story takes place when he is 10 years old. Magnificent.
Lindsay Shockey
Aug 07, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was a great book. Even though it is about a difficult topic, it shows you that one person’s kindness really can make a huge difference!
BookAholic12
Wow, I recommend this one to everyone! What a gripping story!
Edwina Callan
Mar 05, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2018, library-book
Rest In Peace Leon Leyson & Oskar Schindler.
May you never be forgotten.
Danielle Bartos
Jan 09, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
From the time I read Number the Stars in 5th grade and saw Schindler's List in 8th grade I've been captivated by Holocaust stories. However, the two I just mentioned are at opposite extremes, one scratching the surface of atrocity, the other showing it in maximum proportions. It's hard to recommend books to kids about the Holocaust that truly captures all the horrors and makes it real to them, but still in a somewhat sensitive nature. I feel this book does just that. Often kids can read these ki ...more
Linda Hart
Jan 28, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is a moving memoir of Leon Leyson about his 5 years, from age 12 to age 17, in Poland, and Germany, during the Holocaust. With thanks to Oskar Schindler he survived the horrors that killed six million Jews. He did not share his experiences until the movie, “Schindler’s List,” was released in the mid 1990’s. His narration of events is straightforward without the gruesome details of other Holocaust stories. From the publisher: “It is the only memoir published by a former Schindler’s list child. Mo ...more
Dotty
There is much for reflection in this book, but I must comment on the writing first. It isn't often that a memoir reads like novel. Not that the plot or people seemed fictional, but the writing is engaging and entices the reader to stay until finished.

Courage and family may seem small warriors to oppose the evil and hatred Nazism and anti-Semitism. And yet this is what kept Leon and his family enduring. The life Leon and his family are the stuff of nightmares one hopes never see the l
...more
Cori
I found this title on a list of best books from 2013 for ages 9-12. It's amazing to me that Leon's story has only just been published. What an amazing account...I enjoyed the unique perspective of a Jew on Schindler's list. No frills, no fluff, just a straightforward account of all he and his family endured. Couldn't put it down. It didn't read like juvenile fiction to me, either...many ages could read it. I look forward to reading this one with my kids as a way of discussing the Holocaust at so ...more
Allison
Nov 05, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2018-caudill
I remember watching Schindler’s List and this story just brought back all of the sad stories that they include.

The way this is written is perfect for struggling readers because it is easy to read and the history is brought to life.

Before I read this, I was book talking it to students and they would always ask why is it called the boy on the wooden box and I was reply read to find out. Now I know.
Grace
Sep 28, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I liked this book. I thought that it would be more insightful as to how the Jewish people were treated, but it was surprisingly vague. It said how they were treated, but it didn't describe it very completely. It told instead of showed, if that makes sense. I think it wasn't the best writing but it was definitely worth reading.
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“One time when we were in Płaszów a guard struck my mother on the side of her head with a wood plank. The blow permanently shattered her eardrum. She said that for the rest of her life she could hear her two murdered sons calling to her in that ear.” 8 likes
“- No puedes sentarte ahí -dijo-. Los asientos traseros son para los negros. Tienes que cambiarte a la parte delantera.
Sus palabras me golpearon como una bofetada. De repente retrocedí en el tiempo hasta Cracovia, cuando los nazis ordenaron que los judíos nos sentáramos en los asientos traseros de los tranvías (antes de prohibirnos directamente viajar en transporte público). El contexto era muy diferente, pero de todos modos casi hizo explotar mi cabeza. ¿Por qué existía algo así en los Estados Unidos? Yo habría creído, erróneamente, que esa clase de discriminación estaba destinada únicamente a los judíos durante el régimen nazi. Ahora descubriría que la inequidad y el prejuicio existía también en ese país que yo habría aprendido a amar”
3 likes
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