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Henry and the Paper Route

(Henry Huggins #4)

3.99  ·  Rating details ·  5,525 ratings  ·  151 reviews
Ten-year-old Henry Huggins wants a paper route, but unfortunately all applicants have to be at least eleven. Undaunted, Henry sets out to show the boss he can do the job, no matter how many obstacles stand in the way. And, of course, difficulties immediately begin popping up everywhere. Everything he tries backfires, and then the neighborhood's new genius moves in and take ...more
Paperback, 196 pages
Published April 15th 1980 by Yearling (first published 1957)
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3.99  · 
Rating details
 ·  5,525 ratings  ·  151 reviews


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Jane
Feb 05, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I discovered as a kid that I did not care for the later Henry Huggins book's. Now as an adult I find it is still true.
This one is about Henry desire for a paper route.
There were some good moments in this book.
I loved Henry bringing home four kittens, and of course I loved the parts Ramona was in. It reminded me of how hilarious Ramona was when she wanted to get her own way.
All in all a good book, but not one of my favorites.
Philip
Dad: Hey Poppy, will you go get Gwen? She was just here.

Poppy: Yeah.

Eleanor: Are you writing the introduction.

Dad: I am. Although it's lacking. I don't have much to say. We're just all waiting for Gwen.

INTRODUCTION

We spent too long reading this book. We started this back in like... April? And we're in August. I just didn't keep up with it. We read a bunch of one-night-books in the mean time.

I do love Beverly Cleary, though.

Dad: Poppy, tell me something that you remember about the book.

Poppy: I r
...more
Amber Scaife
Jul 15, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Henry really wants a paper route of his own, but at first he's a year too young, and then a new kid moves to the neighborhood and quickly becomes competition...
Charlie is just loving the Henry books so far, and it's fun to read them with him (although Henry's attitude toward girls is a bit neanderthal-like).
unknown
Feb 06, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: readalouds
Somehow I seem to have missed the Henry books in my youth. This was my first, a readaloud. While it was enjoyable as all of Beverly Cleary's books are, it didn't feel quite as unique as the Ramona books, Henry being a more ordinary, sort of slightly dull kid. I'd still happily read another of them.
John Orman
Apr 03, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
These are the tales of Henry Huggins, paper boy at the age of 10. Sisters Beezus and Ramona show up quite a bit here too.

This book came out in 1957, when I was 8 years old. Within a few years, I can remember reading many stories such as these by beloved author and Oregon native Beverly Cleary. However, I did not get my paper route until I had reached the advanced age of 15!

"The Paper Drive" is quite a funny tale of Henry's adventure of collecting old newspapers and magazines for a school paper d
...more
Emily
Mar 30, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Once again, another clever Cleary tale, told from the perspective of Henry Huggins, neighbor of the famed Ramona Quimby. We listened to this on audio and it passed many a mile. At times we even laughed out loud.

(Hard to believe that paper routes are on the verge of extinction now -- I remember the boys on their bicycles and the canvas bags holding the folded newspapers, and how they'd come to the door to collect the money for subscriptions).
Twyla
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Adrienne
Oct 07, 2014 rated it really liked it
The real heroes of this story, as perhaps is true for many children, are Henry’s parents. When the school has a drive for old newspapers and magazines, Henry advertises around the neighborhood and ends up succeeding beyond his own abilities. Ramona gets involved and ruins a few things. Beezus is there, sick of Ramona and trying to help Henry. And Henry’s parents heroically haul and bundle stacks of paper for days. Henry Huggins and his mother and father tie together old newspapers and magazines, ...more
Sadie Joy
Dec 23, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
What is a very important thing to do?

That is Henry Huggin's main question in this book. It is one we can all relate to, I'm sure, when we find ourselves doing something rather dull or seemingly unimportant. And that question can have several different answers, depending on your point of view.

After seeing Scooter, an older school chum, selling newspapers, Henry sets out to get a newspaper route, which, (he decides) is a very important thing to do. Who knew that getting a route of his own could b
...more
Irene
Feb 02, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Elementary school aged kids
Shelves: children
This installment of the Henry Huggins series does not disappoint! As soon as I read the final sentence and closed the book, Isabelle shouted, "Five stars!"

In this book, Henry shows compassion, initiative, drive, and determination. He sees four adorable kittens and goes to great lengths to keep them from being sent to the pound. He wants a paper route, and by golly, he will convince Mr. Capper that he is responsible enough to have one! His school has a paper drive, and - inspired by an off-hand
...more
Judy
Jul 01, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

Good old Henry Huggins wants a paper route but isn't quite old enough. Instead he ends up with a new kitten, names her Nosy, and thereby upsets good old Ribsy.

After another adventure with paper, known as a paper drive, in which Henry's clever advertising method succeeds way beyond his wildest dreams, bad girl Ramona's bad ideas help Henry finally get his route.

I will never forget the summer my sons had a paper route. I worked long hours that summer, including weekends. So the boys often spent we
...more
Vimacone
Jun 14, 2014 rated it liked it
Shelves: school-library
This was another interesting book in the Henry canon. I always liked how determined Henry was to reach his goals, no matter the obstacles. Like most of the Cleary books written in the 1950's, it's interesting to see some dated references such as the terminology (like "mechanical man" for robot). I got a kick out of the references to the Bugs Bunny cartoons that Henry saw in the theater (being an animation fan, I was able to guess a couple of the ones that Henry saw based on a the descriptions). ...more
Leto
Nov 08, 2013 rated it really liked it
Henry tries and really wishes to have a paper route like one of his meanest friends Scooter, but for short Henry calls him Scoot. Henry has to borrow Scooter's route twice because one time Scooter has the chicken pox and the second time he wants to go to the Y, which means he wants to take a swim somewhere.

I liked this story because Ribsy his dog always tries to follow Henry on his bike, but just by his side though.

[review by a 7 year old, typed by his mom]
Dayna
May 05, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: homeschool-kids
A charming look back at a simpler time when kids were free to be curious young people. A fun look at a determined little boy who won't give up on his dream and the quirks of life in a suburban neighborhood.
Julia Southwick
As a kid, these were some of my absolute favorite books! I personally preferred Henry to Ramona and Beezus, but I love that they're neighbors and are featured in each others' stories. I am definitely going to get my kids to read all of Beverly Cleary's books.
R.
Jan 24, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Henry grows responsible and takes on a paper route...and something in him dies just a tad bit.
Sara
Dec 05, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This one is just so cute. Love this one.
Alisha
Wally: it was really good. (Why?) it just was really good. I liked that Ramona said "clank clank." The book was about getting a paper route.
Maggi Andersen
Jun 13, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Things always seem to work out for Henry by the end of the books, which is something my kids and I appreciate. His life isn't without struggles, but he, like us, enjoys a happy ending. The personality of his little neighbor, Ramona, always steals the scene and makes it perfectly apparent why Cleary chose to devote so many books to the spunky little girl who causes so much commotion. All of my children (ages 4, 6, and 9) enjoy when I read aloud from any of Cleary's works. Her writing style and de ...more
Christy
Newbery Medal-winning author Beverly Cleary gives readers a hero they'll relate to—and root for—in this comical and inspiring novel about Henry Huggins's mission to prove himself worthy of his very own paper route.

All the older kids work their own paper route, but because Henry is not eleven yet, Mr. Capper won't let him. Desperate to change his mind, Henry tries everything he can think of to show he's mature and responsible enough for the job. From offering free kittens to new subscribers, to h
...more
Ashley Jacobson
It's fun to see Henry grow up some. He is now 11 and can have a paper route. I appreciate the focus on hard work and responsibility. Henry is a good role model and "friend" for my kids to have. This story had a fuzzy-feeling-inducing ending, as Henry becomes friends with the new kid and a confusing situation is resolved. I like those types of revelations and enjoy discussing them with the kids. Kai can't wait to move on to the next book. He got angry that we couldn't start it tonight after finis ...more
Steve Ward
The 4th book in the Henry series by Beverly Cleary continues in the same vein as before. Once again Henry finds himself in various activities and adventures made more difficult by his dog Ribsy and his friends. I wonder how many kids of today could even relate to a paper route with home delivery almost non-existent? I would recommend this book as a read aloud for young children or as a nice easy read for early readers.
Blaire Malkin
Feb 02, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another great one from Cleary. Henry desperately wants a paper route but has to wait until her turns 11. He works hard to prove he is responsible and along the way matches wits with Ramona and makes a new neighborhood friend. Liked that all the kids were in awe of the new boy who is absorbed in building his robot and Henry’s recognition of different interests and abilities.
Casandria
Even after 61 years, Henry and the Paper Route still holds up and Neil Patrick Harris does a great job of narrating (except Ramona, who sounds like a growly old man). My absolute favorite part was the interview with Beverly Cleary at the end. She was a pioneer for children's literature simply because she wrote books to entertain kids, with characters and experiences they could relate to.
Cheryl
Dec 12, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
As usual, Ramona almost steals the show. But Henry is quite a boy, too... I love that he won't let the kittens go to the pound, and that he tries hard to make friends with new boy Murph, and gives both Murph and Scooter a second chance. And these Cleary books are truly timeless: yesterday at Costco I saw a box set!
Paul
Oct 30, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fun to read a children's book, especially about a little boy growing up in the 50's like I did. In fifth grade I longed to have a paper route like the big seventh grader who delivered in our neighborhood. And the paper drive, a friend showed me his basement filled with newspapers as they were saving for a pool.
Kerri
Dec 01, 2018 rated it liked it
I admired Henry's determination (and his saving of the kittens!) but the interactions with Murph seemed very...off for some reason. Also, his 10/11-year-old-ness is portrayed very well by Cleary. A fun little quick read. I liked these books as a child but now they are just kind of...meh.
Rachael
Nov 19, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-alouds
Henry Huggins is a favorite in our house but this one lacks a bit of the luster of the first one. Despite my opinion on it both my boys (4 and 6) got plenty of enjoyment out of reading this one out loud and we look forward to the checking out another one!
Michelle M.
Dec 14, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Cute story of a young boy, Henry, who wants a paper route so very badly. He has to overcome a few obstacles before his dream can come true but eventually it does. The story is very relatable to young people around his age, 10-13. The story was fun and my grandkids enjoyed it.
Lisbeth Solberg
Remember when boys had paper routes? Once upon a time when children rode bikes and pulled wagons, when people still subscribed to newspapers? This story holds up despite a tinge of quaintness. I still love the illustrations, and of course, Ramona is a scene-stealer, as always.
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2,462 followers
Beverly Cleary (born April 12, 1916) is the author of over 30 books for young adults and children. Her characters are normal children facing challenges that many of us face growing up, and her stories are liberally laced with humour. Some of her best known and loved characters are Ramona Quimby and her sister Beatrice ("Beezus"), Henry Huggins, and Ralph S. Mouse.

Beverly Cleary was born Beverly At
...more

Other books in the series

Henry Huggins (6 books)
  • Henry Huggins (Henry Huggins, #1)
  • Henry and Beezus (Henry, #2)
  • Henry and Ribsy (Henry, #3)
  • Henry and the Clubhouse (Henry, #5)
  • Ribsy (Henry, #6)