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America's Geisha Ally: Reimagining the Japanese Enemy
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America's Geisha Ally: Reimagining the Japanese Enemy

3.94  ·  Rating details ·  33 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
During World War II, Japan was vilified by America as our hated enemy in the East. Though we distinguished "good Germans" from the Nazis, we condemned all Japanese indiscriminately as fanatics and savages. As the Cold War heated up, however, the U.S. government decided to make Japan its bulwark against communism in Asia.

But how was the American public made to accept an all
...more
Hardcover, 397 pages
Published December 15th 2006 by Harvard University Press
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Michael Arden
Mar 13, 2011 rated it really liked it
At the end of World War II the U.S. government realized that Japan would need to be brought back into the Western fold as a bulwark against the Soviet Union and the expansion of communism into East Asia. Problem: many Americans still hated the recently defeated Japanese after the terrible fighting of the Pacific War, called by author John Dower "a war without mercy" between the two nations. Shibusawa's thesis is that the American people had to be led to reimagine the former Japanese enemy as a f ...more
sdw
Feb 10, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Those interested in Foreign Policy, Asian American studies and the cultures of U.S. empire
Recommended to sdw by: my dissertation director
This book examines the post-war transition in U.S. perceptions on Japan: How did Japan go from racialized enemy to racialized ally? The United States’ foreign policy encouraged Japan to be a capitalist ally in Asia in the cold war. The U.S. was invested in Japan’s economic development as a model of capitalist growth during this period. Yet, this book isn’t just about American foreign policy but how American popular culture comes to align with American foreign policy goals. That is, this book exa ...more
AskHistorians
a very readable account of the cultural and media politics of the US occupation of Japan. It examines the transformation of Japan from implacable enemy to "geisha ally" in US eyes, and in doing so, explains much of Japan's current relationship with the US. (US occupation of Japan)
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