Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias (Digital Communication)” as Want to Read:
Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias (Digital Communication)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias (Digital Communication)

by
3.6  ·  Rating details ·  60 Ratings  ·  1 Review
In Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias, Peter Ludlow extends the approach he used so successfully in High Noon on the Electronic Frontier, offering a collection of writings that reflects the eclectic nature of the online world, as well as its tremendous energy and creativity. This time the subject is the emergence of governance structures within online communit ...more
Paperback, 451 pages
Published May 25th 2001 by A Bradford Book (first published April 16th 2001)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Scott
Dec 15, 2013 rated it really liked it
Since I was familiar with Peter Ludlow’s writings and philosophies on linguistics and the Internet via some of Noam Chomsky’s writings, I saw the title and author of this book and thought it would be right “in my wheelhouse”. I wasn’t wrong. While only the introduction and first chapter are written by Ludlow, he has chosen several tech writers and online activists’ pieces to flesh out his views of the online realm and its governance (or lack thereof). I found this book to be fascinating and full ...more
Himanshu
rated it liked it
Apr 15, 2011
Joshua Duffy
rated it liked it
Nov 03, 2014
jazzwand
rated it really liked it
Oct 04, 2014
Ryan Batterman
rated it liked it
Jun 19, 2017
Kenn Monk
rated it it was amazing
Jul 22, 2014
Andrew
rated it liked it
Dec 23, 2008
Nameless
rated it really liked it
Jul 10, 2015
Tim Guy
rated it it was amazing
May 14, 2014
Zhoel13
rated it liked it
Nov 26, 2007
Aimee
rated it really liked it
Sep 20, 2013
iao299792458
rated it liked it
Jun 09, 2013
Peter Ludlow
Sep 26, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  (Review from the author)
Christopher Daniel
rated it really liked it
Oct 30, 2015
Ej Fox
rated it it was amazing
Jun 16, 2012
Jack Lund
rated it liked it
Dec 11, 2016
Tietaja
rated it liked it
Jun 10, 2013
Aatu
rated it liked it
Jun 03, 2013
Lindsay
rated it it was amazing
Feb 22, 2015
Matt
rated it it was ok
Jul 14, 2017
Alexey Mogilnikov
rated it liked it
Aug 29, 2015
Jim Black
rated it really liked it
Apr 23, 2014
space
rated it liked it
May 04, 2007
Stefan Aleksić
rated it it was ok
Feb 26, 2017
Antonio
rated it liked it
May 31, 2013
mm
rated it really liked it
May 27, 2013
Chad Nelson
rated it liked it
Sep 09, 2007
Jan
rated it really liked it
Jun 02, 2017
Bob
rated it really liked it
Aug 23, 2016
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Goodreads is hiring!

If you like books and love to build cool products, we may be looking for you.
Learn more »

Share This Book

“Something needs to be said about the role of anonymity and digital pseudonyms. This is a topic for an essay unto itself, of course. Are true names really needed? Why are they asked for? Does the nation state have any valid reason to demand they be used? People want to know who they are dealing with, for psychological/evolutionary reasons and to better ensure traceability should they need to locate a person to enforce the terms of a transaction. The purely anonymous person is perhaps justifiably viewed with suspicion. And yet pseudonyms are successful in many cases. We rarely know whether someone who presents himself by some name is “actually” that person. Authors, artists, performers, etc., often use pseudonyms. What matters is persistence and nonforgeability. Crypto provides this.” 0 likes
“A specter is haunting the modern world, the specter of crypto anarchy. Computer technology is on the verge of providing the ability for individuals and groups to communicate and interact with each other in a
totally anonymous manner. Two persons may exchange messages, conduct business, and negotiate electronic contracts without ever knowing the true name, or legal identity, of the other. Interactions over networks will be untraceable, via extensive rerouting of encrypted packets and tamper-proof boxes which implement cryptographic protocols with nearly perfect assurance against any tampering. Reputations will be of central importance, far more important in dealings than even the credit ratings of today. These developments will alter completely the nature of government regulation, the ability to tax and control economic interactions, the ability to keep information secret, and will even alter the nature of trust and reputation.”
0 likes
More quotes…