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Moxon's Master
 
by
Ambrose Bierce
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Moxon's Master

3.56  ·  Rating details ·  85 ratings  ·  10 reviews
Can a machine think? And if so, could it be prone to violence like humans?
A pioneering story first published in 1893.
Paperback, 24 pages
Published December 7th 2013 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform (first published January 1st 2003)
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Bettie
Mar 28, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: BBC Radio Listeners


http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03zmdqw

Description: Can a machine think? And if so, could it be prone to violence like humans? A pioneering story first published in 1893, read by Robert Lang.
...more
Amber
May 01, 2019 rated it it was amazing
This was a pretty good horror scifi short story about a madman of science named Moxon who is obessessed on the question "Can machines think?" That he creates one in his workshop. Will his creation cause his downfall? Read this for yourself and find out.

http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-sto...
...more
Quirkyreader
Jan 21, 2017 rated it liked it
This was a very strange tale. I can see why Bierce was a big inspiration for H.P. Lovecraft.
Michael Sorbello
Jul 20, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror
The concept feels like an early prototype of Harlan Ellison’s I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream. The concept of machines gaining human intelligence, and machines developing violent or vengeful tendencies against their creators.
Benjamin Stahl
Dec 03, 2015 rated it liked it
In Moxon's Master, Ambrose Bierce takes his readers down a similar route as Shelley's Frankenstein. The ending, as usual, had a violent, shocking climax, but the part I liked most in this story was the discussion between Moxon and the protagonist about the possibilities of brainless matter still possessing some form of intelligence and awareness of its surroundings.
Laura
From BBC Radio 4 Extra:
Can a machine think? And if so, could it be prone to violence like humans? A pioneering story first published in 1893, read by Robert Lang.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03zmdqw
...more
XPHAIEA.
A debate about the nature and degree of intelligence which a machine can possess, leads to an automaton to strangle a man to death over a game of chess.
Sucharita Biswas
Jul 19, 2020 rated it it was amazing
How would you define a machine?
If it thinks, then would you say that this is a human being?

These are the questions you need to think while reading the story.

If you like to read a gothic story where there are not just apparitions but something more horrific and secretive, then this is a story for horror lovers.
Liz
Nov 16, 2020 rated it liked it
Shelves: short-story
3.5 An early sci-fi story. Can a machine, an automaton, think for itself? Is Bierce the first author to write about AI? An intriguing idea from a master storyteller. Audible edition narrated by Anthony Heald.
Skjam!
Nov 16, 2019 rated it liked it
Recommends it for: science fiction fans
Recommended to Skjam! by: collected edition
Reviewed this in a collected edition here: http://www.skjam.com/2019/11/16/book-... ...more
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Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (1842-1914) was an American editorialist, journalist, short story writer, fabulist and satirist. Today, he is best known for his short story, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge and his satirical lexicon, The Devil's Dictionary.

The sardonic view of human nature that informed his work – along with his vehemence as a critic, with his motto "nothing matters" – earned him the ni
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“There is no such thing as dead, inert matter: it is all alive; all instinct with force, actual and potential; all sensitive to the same forces in its environment and susceptible to the contagion of higher and subtler ones residing in such superior organisms as it may be brought into relation with, as those of man when he is fashioning it into an instrument of his will. It absorbs something of his intelligence and purpose - more of them in proportion to the complexity of the resulting machine and that of its work.” 0 likes
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