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St. Chrysostom: Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles and the Epistle to the Romans, Volume XI

(Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, First Series #11)

4.71  ·  Rating details ·  7 ratings  ·  1 review
With over twenty volumes, the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers is a momentous achievement. Originally gathered by Philip Schaff, the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers is a collection of writings by classical and medieval Christian theologians. The purpose of such a collection is to make their writings readily available. The entire work is divided into two series. The first seri ...more
Kindle Edition, 1256 pages
Published June 8th 2009 by Christian Classics Ethereal Library (first published May 1st 1980)
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Philip Schaff was educated at the gymnasium of Stuttgart, and at the universities of Tübingen, Halle and Berlin, where he was successively influenced by Baur and Schmid, by Tholuck and Julius Müller, by David Strauss and, above all, Neander. At Berlin, in 1841, he took the degree of B.D., and passed examinations for a professorship. He then traveled through Italy and Sicily as tutor to Baron Krisc ...more

Other books in the series

Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, First Series (1 - 10 of 14 books)
  • Prolegomena: St. Augustine's Life and Work, Confessions, Letters, Volume I
  • City of God/Christian Doctrine (Nicene & Post-Nicene Fathers 1)
  • On the Holy Trinity/Doctrinal Treatises/Moral Treatises (Nicene & Post-Nicene Fathers 3)
  • The Writings Against the Manicheans & Against the Donatists (Nicene & Post-Nicene Fathers 1st series 4)
  • Anti-Pelagian Writings
  • Sermon on the Mount/Harmony of the Gospels/Homilies on the Gospels (Nicene & Post-Nicene Fathers 6)
  • Gospel of John, First Epistle of John, Soliliques
  • St. Augustine: Exposition on the Book of Psalms (Enarrationes in Psalmos)
  • Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: First Series, Volume IX St.Chrysostom: On the Priesthood, Ascetic Treatises, Select Homilies and Letters, Homilies on the Statutes
  • Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: First Series, Volume X St.Chrysostom: Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew

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“Homily IX. Rom. IV. 23 “Now it was not written for his sake alone, that it was imputed to him for righteousness; but for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on Him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead.” After saying many great things of Abraham, and his faith, and righteousness, and honor before God, lest the hearer should say, What is this to us, for it is he that was justified? he places us close to the Patriarch again. So great is the power of spiritual words. For of one of the Gentiles, one who was recently come near, one who had done no work, he not only says that he is in nothing inferior to the Jew who believes (i.e. as a Jew), but not even to the Patriarch, but rather, if one must give utterance to the wondrous truth, even much greater. For so noble is our birth, that his faith is but the type of ours. And he does not say, If it was reckoned unto him, it is probable it will be also to us, that he might not make it matter of syllogism. But he speaks in authentic words of the divine law, and makes the whole a declaration of the Scripture. For why was it written, he says, save to make us see that we also were justified in this way? For it is the same God Whom we have believed, and upon the same matters, if it be not in the case of the same persons. And after speaking of our faith, he also mentions God’s unspeakable love towards man, which he ever presents on all sides, bringing the Cross before us. And this he now makes plain by saying, Ver. 25. “Who was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.” 0 likes
“See how after mentioning the cause of His death, he makes the same cause likewise a demonstration of the resurrection. For why, he means, was He crucified? Not for any sin of His own. And this is plain from the Resurrection. For if He were a sinner, how should He have risen? But if He rose, it is quite plain that He was not a sinner. But1326 if He was not a sinner, how came He to be crucified?—For others,—and if for others, then surely he rose again. Now to prevent your saying, How, when liable for so great sins, came we to be justified? he points out One that blotteth out all sins, that both from Abraham’s faith, whereby he was justified, and from the Saviour’s Passion, whereby we were freed from our sins, he might confirm what he had said. And after mentioning His Death, he speaks also of His Resurrection. For the purpose of His dying was not that He might hold us liable to punishment and in condemnation, but that He might do good unto us. For for this cause He both died and rose again, that He might make us righteous. Chap. v. ver. 1. “Therefore being justified by faith, let us1327 1328 have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.” 0 likes
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