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Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief: The Great Chicago Fire, the Haymarket Bomb, and the Model Town of Pullman
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Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief: The Great Chicago Fire, the Haymarket Bomb, and the Model Town of Pullman

3.66  ·  Rating details ·  44 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
The Great Chicago Fire of 1871, the Haymarket bombing of 1886, and the making and unmaking of the model town of Pullman—these remarkable events in what many considered the quintessential American city forced people across the country to confront the disorder that seemed inevitably to accompany urban growth and social change.

In Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief, Carl S
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Paperback, Second Edition, 407 pages
Published November 15th 2007 by University Of Chicago Press (first published January 15th 1995)
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Mike
Aug 02, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: anarchists, incendiaries, socialists
In Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief: The Great Chicago Fire, the Haymarket Bomb, and the Model Town of Pullman the three items mentioned in the title — the first two acute events, assaults on order, and the latter more durable, an attempt at planning order by executive fiat — are examined as articles of faith by which the U.S. industrial city of the late nineteenth century, home of immigrants and labor, was understood.

Immediately after the Chicago Fire people from all walks of life found t
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Fraser Sherman
Dec 23, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history
Smith looks at three major events in 19th century Chicago — the Chicago fire, a once-infamous anarchist bombing, and businessman George Pullman building a model suburb for his workers — to show how American society and its elites grappled with fears that cities were inherently and dangerously disorderly. Immigrants. The working class (who were assumed to be inferior in morals and culture to the middle-class). Criminals. Unions. Socialists. To the city's business leaders, they were all avatars of ...more
Bruce
Using three 'events' in Chicago's history, Professor Smith shows how the media (press and oratory) affected views of those occurrences. All three events happened in the late 1800s as the country saw increased industrialization and immigration. The monied-class controlled the means of production, the media, and the government. The responses to these events heavily favored the propertied class and disparaged attempts by laborers to better their working conditions. Perhaps most interesting is compa ...more
Wes
Mar 27, 2013 rated it liked it
Shelves: chicago
Someday I'll find a University Press book that isn't oppressively dry. This isn't that book.

I picked this up looking for more information on the Haymarket Riot, and received bonus information of the great Fire and the Pullman Strike as well. And while the writing is dense (and dry,) I've come away knowing more about late 1800's Chicago (and the US as well,) as a whole.

Current events make the central themes of the book, (the conflicts in society caused by class and economic divisions, combined wi
...more
Alison
Aug 22, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition


Really well written and engaging. It was dense but well constructed, he had really strong use of primary source material. I would have liked to see a little more tie in of the three events where possible and more consistent analysis of the themes of foreigners and the definition of manhood. Really enjoyed reading this book.
Jennifer
I actually quite enjoyed reading this book. It gives history but with an interesting perspective. I'd recommend this to anyone who is interested in human perspective, history, or the way people interact with one another.
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