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101 Trauma-Informed Interventions: Activities, Exercises and Assignments to Move the Client and Therapy Forward
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101 Trauma-Informed Interventions: Activities, Exercises and Assignments to Move the Client and Therapy Forward

4.10  ·  Rating details ·  210 ratings  ·  6 reviews
This is the workbook that all mental health professionals wish they had at the beginning of their careers. Containing over 100 approaches to effectively deal with trauma, this workbook pulls together a wide array of treatments into one concise resource. Equally useful in both group and individual settings, these interventions will provide hope and healing for the client, a ...more
Kindle Edition, 250 pages
Published May 1st 2013 by PESI Publishing & Media
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 ·  210 ratings  ·  6 reviews


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Mr V F W Soeterik
Good to have on the shelf when it comes to being able to give some exercises to clients or when it comes to treatment planning
Jillybb
Aug 04, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Very helpful contribution to the field. Very practical.
Aislinn Watson
May 01, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I like how many different ideas are in this book, and some of them I’ve used and found to work well. Also lots of interventions that I probably won’t try, because they’re not my style.
Michelle and Brian Pierson
Good

This was very good with regard to trauma and memories and how we seem to block them out without even honestly knowing it
Roberta Fish
Jan 04, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great resource for therapists.
C
Feb 28, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: therapy, trauma
A good introduction for new students/trainees or refresher for professionals from a variety of theoretical orientations. Applications and case studies provided.
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Audiobooks are an incredible way to experience stories—a great narrator can use their voice bring the narrative to life in a way that the...
31 likes · 8 comments
“FOCUSING INSTRUCTIONS: SHORT FORM BY EUGENE GENDLIN, PH.D. 1.​Clear a space How are you? What’s between you and feeling fine? (Don’t answer; let what comes in your body do the answering. Don’t go into anything. Greet each concern that comes. Put each aside for a while, next to you.) Except for that, are you fine? 2.​Felt sense Pick one problem to focus on. Don’t go into the problem. What do you sense in your body when you sense the whole of that problem? Sense all of that, get a sense of the whole thing, the murky discomfort or the unclear body-sense of it. 3.​Get a handle What is the quality of the felt sense? What one word, phrase, or image comes out of this felt sense? What quality-word would fit it best? 4.​Resonate Go back and forth between word (or image) and the felt sense. Is that right? If they match, have the sensation of matching several times. If the felt sense changes, follow it with your attention. When you get a perfect match, the words (images) being just right for this feeling, let yourself feel that for a minute. 5.​Ask What is it, about the whole problem, that makes me so _______________? When stuck, ask questions: What is the worst of this feeling? What’s really so bad about this? What does it need? What should happen? Don’t answer; wait for the feeling to stir and give you an answer. What would it feel like if it was all OK? Let the body answer. What is in the way of that? 6.​Receive Welcome what came. Be glad it spoke. It is only one step on this problem, not the last. Now that you know where it is, you can leave it and come back to it later. Protect it from critical voices that interrupt. Does your body want another round of focusing, or is this a good stopping place?” 1 likes
“For a trauma survivor, yoga, when practiced with awareness of breath and sensation, can be a gentle way to begin to reoccupy her body. When living in a body feels safe again, yoga postures can be used therapeutically to hold and then release the trauma stored there. Often the emotional and physical releases happen without reference to the story, so the survivor is no longer trapped in the victim role.” ~Amy Weintraub” 0 likes
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