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Saiaku No Jiko Ga Okoru Made Hito Wa Nani O Shiteitanoka

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3.99  ·  Rating details ·  399 ratings  ·  34 reviews
Inviting Disaster, by technology and history writer James R. Chiles, is an unusual book: it appeals to the macabre desires that keep us riveted to highway accidents, while knowledgeably discoursing on the often preventable mistakes that caused them. At its heart are colorful stories behind more than 50 of the most infamous catastrophes that periodically chilled the advance of the i ...more
Hardcover
Published 2006 by Sōshisha (first published 2001)
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Average rating 3.99  · 
Rating details
 ·  399 ratings  ·  34 reviews


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Matt
Jun 17, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: disaster
“Vast machines running out of control might sound like something beyond human ken, but one way to keep matters in perspective is to think of a frontier. Americans know all about frontiers, having lost our western one more than a hundred years ago. No new geographic frontiers have opened for us since then, but a different kind of frontier is well under way and was opening even as the West was being won. It is the ‘machine frontier,’ and it is still unconquered. A machine frontier has, in a virtua ...more
Eric_W
Nov 14, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: anyone wh o enjoyed Normal Accidents
Accidents and disasters are often caused by simple, random events or the change in a normal sequence of actions, any one of which could affect the outcome. Had the path of the Air France Concorde been slightly different, or the piece of titanium not fallen off a DC-10, or the plane left a tad earlier or later, or a sealant been used in the fuel tanks, or any one of any other seemingly unimportant events taken place, the plane's tire would not have struck the titanium and a piece of tire would no ...more
Bob Mayer
Nov 14, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The author does a good job mixing older disasters with newer ones. He covers a lot of ground and a lot of disasters. The insights are powerful as are the stories told around each disaster. The focus is often the integration of man and machine, and the flaws inherent.

I found this book after watching Seconds From Disaster on the National Geographic channel due to my own interest in preventing catastrophe. When I was in the Special Forces (the Green Berets) a key component of our planni
...more
Will Byrnes
Sep 15, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
Chiles offers a history of many disasters, accidents, misfortunes, and contends that the increasing complexity of machines in the modern age has raised the likelihood of disasters happening. He provides blow-by-blow descriptions of how the many disasters happened, exactly what went wrong. He notes that much misery might have been avoided by a true focus on safety uber alles, but notes that in most instances other factors were at play. Pushing to meet deadlines results in cutting corners, forcing ...more
Philip Hollenback
Disaster porn at it's finest. This book is certainly not an in depth treatment of the subject, but it does provide an interesting perspectives on the commonalities inherent in the failure of complex machinery.
Ushan
Sep 11, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: engineering
On April 27, 1865, as the Civil War was winding down, the steamboat Sultana was carrying released Union POWs up the Mississippi River. Just north of Memphis, its boilers exploded, killing some people with shrapnel or boiling water, staring fires that burned or suffocated others, and causing others to jump into cold water where they drowned. According to different estimates, 1100-1700 people died, making it the worst maritime disaster in US history. Why did it explode? The boat was grossly overcr ...more
David
You might not want to do what I did and read this on an airline flight. A collection of technological disaster scenarios, Chiles digs down to explore how bad design, unintended consequences, and technology and people set at cross-purposes resulted in disaster. I've read a few technical journal articles on incidents mentioned in the book, and while it's clear it is adapted from a TV series, I wish there was a bit more depth - some of the incidents are described very summarily. That being said, it ...more
Dennis Littrell
Jul 16, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An up close and human look at some infamous foul ups

If you want to know why the Concorde crashed or how things got so fouled up at Chernobyl or what went wrong at Three Mile Island, this very readable book is a good place to start. Chiles gives us diagrams, step-by-step chronologies, and a very human narrative to illuminate these and scores of other technological disasters in a way that makes it excruciatingly clear that most of them could have been prevented.

What these d
...more
Kate
May 31, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Look. This book is about technology and it's 20 years old. But it's really about humans and our responsibilities when it comes to complex technology. So in that way it is still very relevant. And also, it's not like plane crashes and sudden unintentional acceleration aren't still very much in the news. But I imagine if this book was written today it would also include data breaches, AI, and the like. The technology has evolved, and will continue to do so, but the lessons are relevant.
Bill
Jan 30, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This type of book is my catnip so I wasn't surprised that I really enjoyed it. I appreciated that it covered some lesser-known incidents and near-misses that I hadn't heard of before. One lesson I took away from this book is to never ride a new submarine on its sea trials, especially in the project is under pressure for being late. You'll end up at the bottom of the sea, basically guaranteed.
Nathalie
Oct 27, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very interesting book. It shows how a combination of small things can lead to a catastrophe and the importance of a safety culture within an organization. However, the book was published in 2001; the introduction talks about 9/11 but, obviously, recent catastrophes are not covered.
Bill
Jan 01, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well-written with good anecdotes, details, and insights about lots of disasters and near misses. Has its share of horrifying episodes, of course. Don't read it on a flight. Or a train. Or a boat. Good takeaways for system design, though.
Janis Orlovs
Mar 12, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Excellent book, every IT must read.

all others should.
Todd N
May 03, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kindle
This excellent book was recommended in the appendix of a book on project management that I am reading, Making Things Happen.

This book recounts disasters and near misses from what the author calls "the machine frontier," that scary space where machines deviate from their intended function, either through malfunction or bad design. The Kindle version starts with a preface that describes step by step how the World Trade Center towers collapsed on 9/11. Then the book starts with a detailed descrip
...more
Dee Eisel
Oct 14, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science
This is another really interesting book on things we don't like to think about. In this case, it's engineering disasters instead of big weather or earth science - and trust me, if you like Modern Marvels or Seconds From Disaster, you will enjoy this book.

Unlike Megadisasters, Chiles takes the engineering instead of the statistical view of horrible things that happen to modern humans. He argues that there is a system to every disaster, and that certain things happen in common more oft
...more
Mike
Nov 07, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone
This book is part of a sequence that started with the book, "Build your Own Spaceship". The link, not tenuous, but not the major theme of this book, is the Apollo 1 spacecraft fire in 1967 (killed 3 astronauts: "Gus" Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chafee). These men died on the ground in the Apollo capsule that was still being developed. Had this not happened (and no further similar accidents), it is possible that Man would have trod on the Moon before 1969 (or earlier that year).

There
...more
Zaphoddent
Good read for anyone involved with anything more complex than a basic calculator. Sometimes, the author does seem to go on down unnecessary tangents but overall this raised my awareness of the dangers of complacency, not just in chemical plants where I work, but on the road and in planes. I drove safer the week I read this and was more aware of airplane safety. I loved his suggestion of counting the steps between your seat and the nearest exit whenever you get on the plane, as in an emergency, e ...more
Patrick
Nov 30, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Inviting Disaster was a good book if you like to read stories of crazy things that have happened in the past and you want to know how they happened.I really enjoyed the story with the new view on September 11th,were he explained how the collapse of the twin towers happened.This book was very interesting in looking at the facts behind some of the more interesting cases in history were things go wrong.

I recommend this book to anyone who wouldn't mind going back and re reading lines a
...more
Gayle
May 11, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kindle
A hair away from 5 stars - the material is well researched and very interesting, but the writing suffers from an occasional lack of organization. Industrial disasters are often namedropped with little introduction, to add support to case studies that didn't need the assistance, then never mentioned again in that chapter. One otherwise solid chapter compares the similar histories and fates of the doomed Challenger launch and the R.101 dirigible 50 years before, but switches between the two with n ...more
Tommy Grippe
Jan 06, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In this book, James R. Chiles rolls out scores of anecdotes whose underlying interest is in why accidents happen and whether we can think our way around them. Mishaps occur, Chiles writes, for many reasons. When the origins are mechanical, it is quite often the case that some simple, inexpensive part has given out, as when, in July 2000, an Air France Concorde jet crashed after a small strip of titanium fell from the engine of a DC-10 that had taken off moments before. Chiles touches on trains, ...more
Libbabink
May 11, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kindle
A hair away from 5 stars - the material is well researched and very interesting, but the writing suffers from an occasional lack of organization. Industrial disasters are often namedropped with little introduction, to add support to case studies that didn't need the assistance, then never mentioned again in that chapter. One otherwise solid chapter compares the similar histories and fates of the doomed Challenger launch and the R.101 dirigible 50 years before, but switches between the two with n ...more
Craigers
Dec 01, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Fell asleep reading this book multiple times on the train. I don't think you go into reading this book from start to finish, but rather find the events in history that you find ambiguous and would like to learn why. Why did this disaster occur? I heard this was actually on the History Channel and probably would be better as a TV series than a book. Every time I finished one of the stories I felt compelled to research the event and what did the after math. I also felt that some of the terminology ...more
Sol
Jan 05, 2015 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Not a bad book overall, but I would have liked more of a look at what changes were made to prevent accidents from happening again. For example, after TMI, the nuclear industry underwent massive changes and INPO was created to share operational experience between facilities to help reduce the risk of the same type of accident repeating itself. Also, the author grossly misrepresented the Chernobyl accident; only 31 deaths were directly linked to the accident, as it is unknown how many cancer cases ...more
Dane
Jun 24, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
This is a great read for engineers. Everyone knows the same few engineering disaster stories - the Titanic, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, etc... - but this book covers tons of incidents that you probably have never heard of, with both dramatic flair and solid analysis. It also provides deeper perspective on some well-known disasters, such as the Apollo 13 explosion. My only complaint is that Chiles tries to interweave the telling of some of the stories to highlight parallels between them, but this tend ...more
Josh
Nov 29, 2009 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: culture, social
Breakdown of how things go wrong from plane crashes, to submarine accidents, to building collapses, to NASA accidents, and many, many more. Reinforces "if you see something, say something".

And, as virtually all instances in the book had people seeing and saying, but tragically few instances of anybody actually doing anything to fix the problem, causing a fuss to make people do something about an issue is probably worth the effort. (saving lives in the process)
Edward
Mar 06, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfic
Great book - well-written, engaging, well-researched, and simply a really interesting topic. I have read articles with similar information on system failures, but this was the most in-depth information I've found concerning how complex systems fail.
Christopher
Feb 14, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Excellent book on how little overlooked details can lead to change reactions on epic scales. Fascinating book cover events of the last 150 years that demonstrate man is not always the master of technology.
Jen Thornton
Sep 23, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fantastic look at how complex systems fail - how complacency, management separation from the actual work being done and false perceptions of risk contribute to failures. Engaging read that does not turn away from the sometimes heart breaking details.
Nick Searles
If you fly alot this might not be the book for you. This book is a real eye opener to alot of Americas blunders over the last 200 years. It makes you realise even if you feel you have a very small part in something, it could be bigger than you realise.
Bob
May 29, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: math-engineering
A must-read for design engineers. Absolutely essential.
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