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Fever 1793

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3.9  ·  Rating details ·  86,753 Ratings  ·  4,966 Reviews
It's late summer 1793, and the streets of Philadelphia are abuzz with mosquitoes and rumors of fever. Down near the docks, many have taken ill, and the fatalities are mountain. Now they include Polly, the serving girl at the Cook Coffeehouse. But fourteen-year-old Mattie Cook doesn't get a moment to mourn the passing of her childhood playmate. New customers have overrun he ...more
Library Binding, 251 pages
Published March 1st 2002 by Turtleback (first published September 1st 2000)
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Taylor It was definitely frightening at points. I was thinking.."what if I lived during this??". To see my friends or family die right in front of me..trying…moreIt was definitely frightening at points. I was thinking.."what if I lived during this??". To see my friends or family die right in front of me..trying to help them survive but not even knowing where to begin.. It would be heartbreaking. The book shows how far we have come in medical technology, which I know I'm stating the obvious, but sometimes we need a reminder of all that has changed. It was nice learning about the Fever of 1793 because it is something that actually happened and I never learned about it prior in school. (less)
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UniquelyMoi ~ BlithelyBookish

Many years ago I took my now adult kids out of public school to home-school them, and this was one of the first books I bought to add to their reading curriculum and library when I was looking for entertaining ways to teach history. Well, guess what? We all loved this book!! I've thought about it often through the years and now... I think it's time for a re-read. It's thought provoking in a way younger readers can understand, and older readers can appreciate.

Blurb...

It's late summer 1793, and t
...more
Kristi
Fever 1793 is based on the actual yellow fever epidemic that hit Philadelphia and wiped out some five thousand people. One of those people affected by the fever is Mattie Cook. Mattie’s mother and grandfather own a coffeehouse in Philadelphia and that is where Mattie spends most of her days.

She has plans of her own for the coffeehouse someday and often day dreams of what it would be like when she ran the establishment. Mattie’s day dreams are shattered when the epidemic hits.

Mattie’s mother fall
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Scarlett
In 1793, Philadelphia, PA was the largest city in the established colonies. The city streets, called alleys at the time, were laid out in a grid pattern as many modern cities are laid out today. Located on the Delaware River made it an ideal spot for accessibility and trade. Markets, banks, coffeehouses, a university and the State House made it a desirable, modern city of its' time.
The central location was one of the reasons the Constitutional Convention was called to order in Philadelphia duri
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Jennifer
Fever 1793 is a standalone, young-readers novel written by Laurie Halse Anderson. Although it falls in the genre of historical fiction, this story is based on a very real event in history. If interested, you can learn more about the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 by clicking HERE.

As a reader and a parent who supports academic success, I can acknowledge the benefits of educating youth via literature. Even I learned a lot from reading this book. But how much are they learning if they are trudging t
...more
Jeffrey
Jun 20, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fever 1793 is one of the rare children's novels that I will recommend to adults to read.
As a middle school English teacher, reading children's and young adult fiction is part of the job. Often it is enjoyable, and often I am annoyed because I would rather be reading something else. Usually, after a spree of YA literature I must read Faulkner or a chapter from Ulysses to come out even. YA books are often formulaic. The formula includes a protagonist that is generally angst-ridden, complaining
...more
Rebecca McNutt
This book was quite depressing, to say the least. Nonetheless it's still an excellent historical novel which captures a long-forgotten time period that most readers could never even imagine luckily.
Alfreda
Apr 25, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
When I first found out that I had to read this book, I was not excited about it, because usually school books are boring and have no interest for me in it. When I first started to read this book I thought here we go again another boring book, why are doing this to me? I got more into the book as time went by, and wound up actually liking it. This book had become interesting and it was like no other book that I had read before, which was a good thing. In the next few paragraphs, I will tell you ...more
Tink Magoo is bad at reviews

First a small ramble.

When I was at school I always thought 'What do I want to learn history for, it's boring, where will it get me and what help will it be'. Just imagine if everyone had the same outlook, we would lose so much knowledge. Thankfully now I'm an old withered up Mother I can appreciate our past a lot better.

"Life was a battle, and Mother a tired and bitter captain"

This story really punched me in the heart with its sorrow. And what really makes it hit home, is the fact that in this
...more
Emmy
I just sped up the narration on the audiobook to finish this faster. That speaks volumes since I've never done that before.

This wasn't terrible or anything, it was just kind of boring. It's just a series of people getting sick. One gets sick, gets nursed, and gets better. Then another falls sick, gets nursed, etc., etc. For almost 300 pages that's all that happens. The one time it started to get interesting for me was when Matty was describing Philadelphia a month or so after the epidemic start
...more
Britany
Mattie Cook is a 14 year old growing up helping her mom out in the coffeehouse. Trying to get out of doing her chores and playing adventures with her best friends Polly & Nathaniel. All of a sudden, Polly comes down with a fever, and from there the fever strikes the city of Philadelphia. Set in the 1790s and based on true events, we discover along with Mattie, the harsh realities of growing up in that time, without modern medicine, trying to survive the yellow fever.

This was a quick read, an
...more
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Great Middle Grad...: * Book of the Season 3 - FEVER 1793 3 15 Jul 14, 2017 01:48PM  
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10003

Ask box is open, my friends! What do you want to know?

UPDATE!

The final book in my thrilling historical trilogy about the American Revolution, ASHES, will be published October 4, 2016!


I recently answered all kinds of great questions over at Reddit. Check it out for loads about my writing process and my books:https://www.reddit.com/r/books/commen...

For bio stuff: Laurie Halse Anderson is the New Yor
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More about Laurie Halse Anderson...
“It had been a good day, all things considered. I had managed rather well on my own. I opened Grandfather's Bible. This is what it would be like when I had my own shop, or when I traveled abroad. I would always read before sleeping. One day, I'd be so rich I would have a library full of novel to choose from. But I would always end the evening with a Bible passage.” 18 likes
“No. Absolutely not. I forbid it. You'll have nightmares."
"She was my friend! You must allow me. Why are you so horrid?"
As soon as the angry words were out of my mouth, I knew I had gone too far.
"Matilda!" Mother rose from her chair. "You are forbidden to pseak to me in that tone! Apologize at once.”
7 likes
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