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These Colors Don't Run

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#1 Bestseller in Amazon Kindle's "Religious Short Stories"

Praise for These Colors Don't Run:

"I love an incredible, unputdownable surprise of a book, and These Colors Don't Run is it." --GoodeReader.com

Description:

From a young, fresh voice comes a novella about slavery and freedom: These Colors Don't Run, the story of Samuel, an orphan and slave in 1830s Georgia. After Samuel's mother Mary dies, he is sold to a new owner. On the journey to his master's plantation, luck or the Lord intervenes, and fifteen-year-old Samuel and another boy escape into the woods while chained together. With the master's hound at his heels, Samuel makes a desperate decision that will haunt him for the rest of his life: Is freedom worth killing for?

These Colors Don't Run is an unflinching and unforgettable book. It wrestles with the founding myths and realities of our country: slavery, freedom, fatherhood, family, loss, faith, and the pursuit of the American Dream.

*These Colors Don't Run is a novella. The paperback edition is 186 pages in length.

*These Colors Don’t Run is a spin-off companion book of Andrew Galasetti’s novel, To Breathe Free. However, both can be enjoyed as standalone works. To learn more about To Breathe Free, please visit http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18...

186 pages, Kindle Edition

First published August 8, 2013

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About the author

Andrew Galasetti

2 books16 followers
Andrew Galasetti is an entrepreneur and author. Born and raised on the Jersey Shore, Andrew has always had ideas flowing through him and expressed those ideas with the arts and entrepreneurship.

Today, Andrew continues with his entrepreneurial and artistic endeavors. He is the author of “These Colors Don’t Run” and “To Breathe Free.” “These Colors Don’t Run” is the story of Samuel, an orphan and slave in 1830s Georgia who makes a decision that has a great reward—freedom—but which also comes at great costs. “To Breathe Free” (coming soon!) continues the story of Samuel and his family many years later as they still strive “to breathe free” as Emma Lazarus wrote in her classic poem, “The New Colossus.”

To connect with Andrew, please visit http://andrewgalasetti.com

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5 stars
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Displaying 1 - 6 of 6 reviews
Profile Image for Grady.
Author 50 books400 followers
December 31, 2013
`Hope, perseverance, and a leap of faith'

Andrew Galasetti is an amazing lad. His first novel is not only immensely touching and well executed, but his own life to date, when married with the story line of THESE COLORS DON'T RUN', makes this a book for everyone to read for so many reasons. His stand on living in the now and continuing to pursue his dreams and in doing so, encourage others to follow is so very well summarized n a statement he has made that it deserves sharing in fragments here.

`I'm very fortunate. I know exactly what my purpose and passion in life is, and I have many lofty, yet attainable, dreams that I'm working toward. I want to write books and create various forms of art that impact others, while making a decent income from it and paying it forward. Many people are less fortunate. They haven't figured out what they are meant to do, and even worse, they have never truly dreamed. Now, I know. It's been drilled into my head: the economy is tough, you need money, you should take whatever job you can get, you need a roof over your head, food on your plate, and health insurance. Besides, people in other parts of the world have it worse off. So forget about "passion, purpose, dreams," and all that self-help crap. I acknowledge this, but I can't accept it. I cannot settle for that and be content. If I did accept this, from morning until night, and even in my sleep, my head would be filled with regret and thoughts of "what if?" and "shoulda, coulda, woulda." I can't live like that. There's no freedom. If I've learned anything from my late grandfather and his unfulfilled literary dreams, it is that time is precious. I am determined to break free and pursue the life I want, and do it NOW. Think of this as my written and published declaration to never end up like that. I know what direction I want and need to go. But it's a long journey to there, and I'm here. I'm 25, with years of student loan debt ahead, bills to pay, and a bleak economy to contend with. How do I get from here to there? With hope, perseverance, and a leap of faith. As a young entrepreneur, growing up poor, fatherless, and with a learning disability, I have dealt with plenty of adversities and failures before. Through it all, my hope and perseverance have only grown stronger. With this hope and perseverance, opportunities always appear.'

The story of this novel has been well outlined here: Samuel is an orphan slave in 1830s Georgia who makes a decision that has a great reward--freedom--but which also comes at great costs. After Samuel's mother Mary dies, he is sold to a new owner. On the journey to his master's plantation, luck or the Lord intervenes, and fifteen-year-old Samuel and another boy escape into the woods while chained together. With the master's hound at his heels, Samuel makes a desperate decision that will haunt him for the rest of his life: Is freedom worth killing for? The book wrestles with the founding myths and realities of our country: slavery, freedom, fatherhood, family, loss, faith, and the pursuit of the American Dream.' This is a book and a writer and a caring human being who deserves our careful attention.

Grady Harp
Profile Image for Cheryl Minekime.
59 reviews4 followers
March 9, 2014
I will be completely honest and admit up front that this book is not one I would have likely picked up and read on my own. But I have been introduced to a number of indie authors and their work through my Facebook association with best selling author, Hugh Howey. After participating in a thoughtful discussion with Mr. Galasetti and others on one of Hugh's posts, he offered to send me a copy of this book for free. Knowing that every penny counts to an indie author, I politely declined but immediately purchased a copy outright and promised I would read it as soon as I could.

I have to say that it was probably one of the best impulsive purchases I have ever made. "These Colors Don't Run" is a simple but thought-provoking tale of a young runaway slave named Samuel who finds freedom and a new life with the Seminole Native Americans in Florida. His security and freedom are short-lived however when the U.S. Army arrives. Through deception, Samuel manages to escape being sent back to his cruel master and joins members of the tribe when they are forcibly relocated to Arkansas.

This is story full of heartache and loss. Samuel and his wife, Harriet, lose one baby after another, as they struggle to survive out on the Plains with few resources. But it is also one of determination, faith and perseverance. Mr. Galasetti weaves a completely believable tale and neither lingers on nor sugar-coats the harsh realities of slavery or the hardships those men and women were forced to endure during that pivotal period in American history prior to and during the Civil War.

Framing the story like book-ends, the tale begins with Samuel's son George hearing his father's life story late one night when he wakes in the middle of the night and finds him sitting alone by a bonfire. It ends with George being forced to leave home, much as Samuel was forced to leave Florida, but with the promise that we will learn more of George's fate in Mr. Galasetti's forthcoming book, "To Breathe Free".
Profile Image for Ingrid Hall.
Author 18 books31 followers
September 19, 2014
Okay, so this little gem has been sitting patiently in our "To Review" queue for over twelve months! (Authors requesting reviews, please note that review times do vary) I was a little wary going in as I had put up all sorts of barriers in my head. Slavery is one of those issues that still disturbs me, and I wasn't sure if I was going to be able to "cope" with the book. Or whether or not, it was just going to be too "heavy" for me.

First up, this is a very SHORT book and is, therefore, in spite of the subject matter a very quick read. It is for the most part brilliantly written, apart from the ending, which I will come to in a bit. Galasetti's characterization is amazing, and both Samuel and his partner Harriet, are incredibly believable. I did find that certain elements of the first part of the book disturbed me as the descriptions of the slave's suffering is incredibly visual. However, the plot is fast-moving, and I ended up making time during the day yesterday to finish the book - instead of waiting for my usual nightly "kindle time."

The curious thing about this book is that while it does link to "To Breathe Free" which I believe picks up on Samuel and his son and covers later years...I still felt that the author was whizzing through time and cramming what could easily have been a lengthy series, into a tiny novella. Don't get me wrong, he pulls it off, but, I wanted more. More emotion with the big event scenes (which occurred chapter by chapter) I also thought that his "evil deed" was grossly underplayed throughout the book.

The ending: random and rushed are the only two words that I can come up with! It totally came out of nowhere, and (for me) didn't fit with the rest of the characterization, which I have already said was brilliant up until this point. Without giving away any spoilers, I just don't see why Samuel would do that! It had me scratching my head for a couple of hours after I had put my kindle away!

Overall, gripes aside, I would highly recommend this book!
163 reviews
October 6, 2013
I received this book from the author through the Goodreads giveaway. It was a great story and a quick read. Many times, books like this can be long and drawn out, but not this one. The story was told in little snippets, but yet it was a complete story and focused on the important details. There was only one part that I wasn't sure about and that was the ending. I'm still not quite sure exactly what happened, but I am continuing to think about it. Overall, it was a good story.
Profile Image for Pamela J.
419 reviews
September 5, 2014
What an accomplishment! My review comes from being a reader of historical fiction and professor of literature. I find this book to be poignant examination of universal themes and a respectful memorial to US slavery and its slaves.
A writer to watch!
Profile Image for Sheila Read.
1,574 reviews39 followers
September 17, 2013
commenting on the cover the cover makes me want to read it because it's just like it's a mystery.
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6 reviews

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