Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Underland: A Deep Time Journey” as Want to Read:
Underland: A Deep Time Journey
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Underland: A Deep Time Journey

4.34  ·  Rating details ·  32 ratings  ·  13 reviews
Discover the hidden worlds beneath our feet...

In Underland, Robert Macfarlane takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet. From the ice-blue depths of Greenland's glaciers, to the underground networks by which trees communicate, from Bronze Age burial chambers to the rock art of remote Arctic sea-caves, this is a deep-time voyage into the planet's past and futur
...more
Hardcover, 280 pages
Expected publication: May 2nd 2019 by Hamish Hamilton
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
4.34  · 
Rating details
 ·  32 ratings  ·  13 reviews


Filter
 | 
Sort order
Fiona
Feb 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I’m a seasoned armchair traveler, used to shadowing journeys that I know I’ll never do myself. One of my BFFs is always telling me ‘never say never’ and perhaps she’s right, except when it comes to this book, Underland. Hand on heart, I will never follow in Robert Macfarlane’s footsteps underground. I’m too claustrophobic.

This book is many layered. A bridging theme to his many different journeys is our generation’s legacy to the future. In the words of Jonas Salk, “Are we being good ancestors?”
...more
Fiona
I’m a seasoned armchair traveler, used to shadowing journeys that I know I’ll never do myself. One of my BFFs is always telling me ‘never say never’ and perhaps she’s right, except when it comes to this book, Underland. Hand on heart, I will never follow in Robert Macfarlane’s footsteps underground. I’m too claustrophobic.

This book is many layered. A bridging theme to his many different journeys is our generation’s legacy to the future. In the words of Jonas Salk, “Are we being good ancestors?”
...more
Nigel
Without question the best/most interesting Macfarlane book I have read. 4.5/5 and happily rounded up. Full review nearer publication
Alex Sarll
Macfarlane's latest book is his weirdest and most magical, his most political, and definitely his darkest. Maybe also his best. It's a coming to terms with the Anthropocene that is aware of the issues with that term, and which at times feels like it would be more at home with Donna Haraway's alternate coinage of the Cthulhucene – not least when a melting glacier exposes something ancient and horrifying which for a moment resembles a black pyramid. Alan Garner gets a mention early on, but that's ...more
Karina
Utterly stunning writing, and for me, his finest book to date.
Aria
Mar 20, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
---- Disclosure: I received this book for free from Goodreads. ----

So, this was okay. It needs to be thinned down, particularly for reading by the wider public. For those who are already into this kind of thing, it could benefit from more detail regarding specific sites, & maybe fewer remarks about the author's personal experience. So basically I am suggesting that there are two possible books here. There is a lot of info. in here. It's too much, frankly. Bonus points for the Pixies refere

...more
Karen
Feb 22, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I want to read everything this author has written....
Katy Wheatley
Feb 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I absolutely loved this book. It was pretty hard to read in places, not because he doesn't write beautifully, because he so does, but because he lays out the environmental catastrophe we are heading towards pretty clearly and it's fairly terrifying. In between that I was entranced to find out about the wood wide web, and invisible cities and hidden rivers and all kinds of treasures, man made and natural. It's an epic and thrilling read. I feel very privileged to have been given an advance copy v ...more
Meg
Dec 19, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A masterful poet and naturalist explores the wonders beneath our feet.

I had read and loved Macfarlane’s The Old Ways a few years back and while this was a very different book in many ways, I still felt much of the same sense of quite reverence for the natural world around us.

This was a book I enjoyed most when I had a short chunk of time to immerse myself in a chapter. This isn’t a book to race through. Like Macfarlane himself does in this book, it is best if you allow yourself the space to dig
...more
Diana Hale
Feb 25, 2015 rated it really liked it
Finally got round to finishing this, re-reading most of it! A mixed bunch of essays, some fairly dense.
Siobhan
Feb 16, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Underland is a look at the world below, an exploration of the Earth's 'underworld' and the effect it has on society, science, and elsewhere. Glaciers, underground rivers, caves, mines, tree roots, catacombs, and nuclear waste sites all feature as Macfarlane combines physical travel with academic reading and a look at human imagination and past.

The book feels poised between the past and the future, looking constantly at time and deep time and what will happen to these underlands next. Human stori
...more
Arcana
Advanced reading copy supplied from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a fair review.

Underland is a journey in the unseen, a call to consider the secret caverns and tombs of both natural and human design.There is a wonderful blend of both actual exploration and imaginative joy in this book, discussing not only the literal domain of all that that extends below our travelled world but also how human history and habit has shaped our views on such places; and in addition, what will happen t
...more
Craig Evans
Marvelously written. Enticingly lyrical and poetic. Deeply personal and thoughtful.
MacFarlane takes us on his visits to multiple locations, primarily in the European area, and delves into the environment and structure of that realm which lies beneath us... caves, tunnels, fungal networks. Locations in which humans and those before us and after us have and will encounter experiences in which the lives we live on the surface are relegated mild.
At times strongly emotional, at other somewhat frighte
...more
PD Sand
rated it it was amazing
Jan 07, 2019
Rubenb
rated it liked it
Feb 23, 2019
Mim
rated it liked it
Dec 14, 2015
Mil Norman-risch
rated it it was amazing
Aug 06, 2017
Wendy Mcleod
rated it it was amazing
Feb 21, 2019
Veery Huleatt
rated it really liked it
Dec 20, 2018
S
rated it it was amazing
Mar 06, 2019
Derek
rated it really liked it
Feb 25, 2019
Helvellyn
rated it it was amazing
Feb 23, 2019
Darren Hardy
rated it it was amazing
Mar 24, 2019
Eleanora
rated it really liked it
Jun 20, 2018
Matt Blackstock
rated it it was amazing
Jan 09, 2019
Jamie
rated it liked it
Nov 24, 2017
Gaël
rated it really liked it
Feb 23, 2019
Isley Forrester
rated it it was amazing
Mar 12, 2019
Diarmid Sullivan
rated it liked it
Feb 13, 2015
Adam D'Costa
rated it it was amazing
Feb 17, 2019
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
787 followers
Robert Macfarlane is a British nature writer and literary critic.

Educated at Nottingham High School, Pembroke College, Cambridge and Magdalen College, Oxford, he is currently a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and teaches in the Faculty of English at Cambridge.