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Coração Impaciente

4.21  ·  Rating details ·  9,740 ratings  ·  983 reviews
Hofmiller, um oficial de cavalaria austro-húngaro, de passagem por uma pequena cidade da fronteira húngara, é convidado para uma festa em casa de um abastado proprietário local, para uma fuga à rotina militar. As instalações são fascinantes, o vinho corre livremente mas, quando o jovem e entusiasmado Hofmiller convida a bela filha do seu anfitrião para dançar, descobre que ...more
Hardcover, 296 pages
Published June 2013 by Civilização Editora (first published 1939)
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Nate I have not read either version, but every translation I've read from Anthea Bell has been incredible (she translated WG Sebald). I want to read her ve…moreI have not read either version, but every translation I've read from Anthea Bell has been incredible (she translated WG Sebald). I want to read her version when I pick this one up. (less)

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Bill Kerwin
May 01, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels, fiction

Did you enjoy Wes Anderson's film The Grand Hotel Budapest? Did you become entranced—as I did—by its nostalgia for the Austro-Hungarian Empire in those moonlight days before the Great War? Beware of Pity (1939), the novel which inspired the film, was written by Stefan Zweig--in exile, in London—during the time when the Nazis occupied his beloved Vienna, when Germany subsumed Austria into itself, and Austria--alas!--was no more. How ironic: at the very moment Zweig was mourning the cultural demis
...more
Adam Dalva
Zweig is a master of the novella, and his mastery shows in BEWARE OF PITY, which unfortunately is a novel.

Were this 130 pages long, it would have been salvageable (not CHESS STORY level, but what is?), but the excitement of the Zweigian opening (an author, a stranger, a story within-a-story) began to diminish when it became clear that this wasn't a novel with multiple parts. Here is the spoiler-free plot, in full: a poor cavalry officer sees a beautiful woman in town, finagles an invitation to
...more
Jim Fonseca
Truth in advertising: the title tells us exactly what this book is about. It’s set in Austria in peacetime in 1914 in the time leading up to WW I. A young cavalry officer is invited to a party at the home of the most wealthy family in the town he is stationed in. He sees his host’s daughter sitting with women, her legs covered by a blanket. Unaware that her disfigured legs are useless, he asks her to dance (he’s 25; she’s about 18). Everything goes downhill from there.

description

The young woman falls in l
...more
Steven Godin
Beware of Pity, Zweig's one and only novel, was a book that had eluded me for quite some time, but learning of a new translation by Oxford Academic Dr Jonathan Katz (who has worked on writings by Goethe and Joseph Roth), I followed through and got hold of a copy whilst on a trip back to my home City of Bath, and as things would have it, I also learned Zweig actually stayed in Bath for a time after fleeing mainland Europe during the war. Reading 'Impatience of the Heart' was well worth the wait, ...more
David
Disclaimer: Despite whatever I say in the following review, and no matter how much I mock Beware of Pity, I did actually enjoy it. To a limited extent.

Stefan Zweig is an enormous drama queen. Every emotion in his novel Beware of Pity is hyperbolic, neon-lit, hammy. His narrator doesn't feel anything as prosaic as mere mere joy. No way. He's more apt to be 'blithe as a twittering bird.' People aren't only surprised; their faces turn white as a specter, their legs threaten to give way, and their w
...more
İntellecta
May 17, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Stefan Zweig writes in a very beautiful language and describes the thoughts and feelings of the protagonist so aptly and comprehensibly. The book shows a touch of psychoanalysis, but also for the sake of the human soul and the effects of different types of compassion. In his subtle, imaginative language, the author creates his own world of unparalleled atmospheric density. His creatures, with the knowing maturity of the experienced human connoisseur and the compassion of the passionate philanthr ...more
Dolors
Mar 23, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Those not afraid of being found out
Pity. It had never dawned upon me what a double-edged feeling pity is. Neither had I dwelled for long on the ramifying consequences of actions triggered by that feeling. Compassion, generosity and benignity are considered virtues promoted by years of religious heritage and have therefore been imprinted on mankind’s consciousness from the beginning of times, but the mental processes and the tapestry of neuronal connections that generate good deeds are as inscrutable as the mosaic of celestial bod ...more
Kiekiat
Jan 26, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classic-novels
It is a daunting task to come late to the party and attempt to write a review of a book that already has 766 reviews. What more can I add to the story? Anyone doing even a cursory read of past reviews can quickly surmise what this book is about. It is the first fiction I've ever read by Stefan Zweig, but certainly not the last. I have read about half of his biography of Magellan, which I intend to finish some day and found quite good. I was reading it in Thailand and moved on to the Philippines, ...more
Rakhi Dalal
Sep 11, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: compelling

The word ‘Pity’ is quite a powerful word. It is charged with the evocation of that emotion which surfaces when one witnesses human suffering in any form; an emotion which leads to feeling of compassion and sympathy. So to feel pity over someone’s misfortune or suffering is essentially human. But what does the feeling of pity really employs? Is it only a positive emotion which paves the way for better understanding of humans and their sufferings? Or can it be an emotion which arises solely from t
...more
Tony
May 14, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Tony by: Janet
My friend and I both pity the homeless, but I prefer to do it from a distance. My friend isn't like that. He likes to put money in cup. Through the years, his insistence on an actual physical exchange has grown exponentially. It was one thing to raise the gift from $1 to $2 to $5 and then $10. But then even that changed. We drifted apart and then slowly saw each other again. Walking back to our jobs after lunch after renewing our friendship we passed a homeless man that we had passed many times ...more
Perry
Aug 25, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
BEWARE OF PITY (Ungeduld des Herzens, orig. title in German)
[revised 10/21/17]
Pick up a bee from kindness, and learn the limitations of kindness.
Sufi Proverb

Upon finishing this, Stefan Zweig's only completed novel, after reading his memoir, The World of Yesterday, I've found that the Austrian Zweig was one of those singularly gifted observers of the human condition, that come along maybe only once a generation, able to regularly discern the profound in the mundane as if such a talent came like r
...more
Gabrielle
My love affair with Stefan Zweig’s work continues! With his elegant prose and sharp insight, he conjured up the most vivid characters and insane - yet completely believable stories, and “Beware of Pity” (alternately translated as “Impatience of the Heart”) is his writing at top form; funny, sour, moving, tragic and wistful. It was also his only full-length novel, finished in 1939, when he lived in exile in England. So expect his trademark nostalgia for a Europe now disfigured by totalitarianism. ...more
Paul Blakemore
Dec 03, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favourites
This is one of the best books I've ever read. It does everything that really great books should do. It takes the idea of pity and really explores it as a human emotion. It left me feeling as if I might be a bit wiser about how to be a decent human being. On top of that, it is readable and I found it a bit of a page-turner due to the brilliant characters.

It is so cleverly constructed too; a layering of narrative on narrative so that as each person tells a story or relates a rumour they all begin
...more
Parthiban Sekar
“There are two kinds of pity. One, the weak and sentimental kind, which is really no more than the heart's impatience to be rid as quickly as possible of the painful emotion aroused by the sight of another's unhappiness, that pity which is not compassion, but only an instinctive desire to fortify one's own soul against the sufferings of another; and the other, the only one at counts, the unsentimental but creative kind, which knows what it is about and is determined to hold out, in patience and ...more
Sharon Barrow Wilfong
This book was quite powerful. I do not know when I have become so emotionally involved with a story. I found myself involuntarily having conversations with the characters, lecturing them on their fatal flaws.

This is a book about fatal flaws. Our protganist, Hofmiller, is an Austro-Hungarian cavalry officer stationed at a small village at the edge of the empire, in what would now be Hungary.

While there he encounters a wealthy family who welcomes him like a family member. Hofmiller is delighted wh
...more
Rebecca McNutt
Jun 29, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classic, german, fiction
Beware of Pity is an impressive yet incredibly sad story and one that will resonate with readers long after they've read it.
E. G.
Foreword
Author's Note
Introduction


--Beware of Pity

Translator's Afterword
Roman Clodia
I'd heard good things about Zweig but gosh, this book is unconvincing melodrama. There's the germ of a taut novella here but dragging the whole thing out to 450 pages wore me down. There's just so much of everything: some relevant, a whole load just waffle.

Although written in 1938, this has the turgid feel of something far older. We might not know, from the book, that Hitler has annexed Austria and that WW2 is close to starting - instead the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, one of the cause
...more
Chuck LoPresti
Oct 05, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Beware of Pity is not going to please anybody that isn't willing to tolerate some anachronistic histrionics in the process of telling a pretty engaging story. The plot is fairly simple: an officer can't stand to offend so he allows himself to be manipulated by a family in need of a love-object/hero to save their invalid daughter. That alone would hardly merit 4 stars but Zweig is a great story teller and what is most important here is the psychological insights of a friend of Freud. Stepping ins ...more
George
"Beware of Pity" ("The Heart's Impatience" in German) is a 1939 novel by the Austrian writer Stefan Zweig.

A few thoughts:

It's a brilliant - though melancholy - exploration of compassion and pity.
It's also a fascinating study of human psychology and the interior realms.
It reminded me of "Notes From Underground" by Fyodor Dostoevsky (both have an antihero protagonist and explore human psychology).
I also detect a parallel between the Anton/Edith relationship and Dostoevsky's narrator/prostit
...more
Chrissie
Reading books written by authors from different nations gives you a feel for respective countries and cultures. I enjoy this. Zweig captures life in the Austro-Hungarian Empire before its fall. Knowledge of times past helps us better understand modern cultures and traditions; the past puts a stamp on the future and therefore I like reading about the past. Anyhow, the book is a story within a story. The person who supposedly has written the story is relating what he was told by a friend in 1938, ...more
Calzean
A tragedy in many senses.
A tragedy for Edith for being considered a cripple and not a person.
A tragedy for the Lieutenant for being so naive and trapped within the rigid world of the Austro-Hungarian army.
A tragedy for Edith's father who so wanted Edith to be well.
A tragedy for Edith's doctor who could see what was happening and could not prevent it.
A tragedy for all for the ending.
A tragedy for everyone living in their cocoon world who did not see a world war coming.
Zweig is able to paint the p
...more
Brendan Monroe
Every so often you’ll read a book that just floors you with its greatness. If we’re lucky we might read one or two of these books a year, but the number is often much less than that. There just aren’t many of these kinds of books getting published anymore, so to find a really great one it’s often necessary to reach back and pull one off the mighty heap that history has given us.

Stefan Zweig’s “Impatience of the Heart” is one of those books. Writing about it now leaves me fearful of tripping all
...more
Nigeyb
Oct 07, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A very powerful work and Stefan Zweig's only full length novel.

Stefan Zweig generally cut and cut his longer stories until arriving at the essence of the tale. Beware of Pity is therefore an anomaly, one that forces me to conclude he should have written more novels.

Memorable characters abound in this book that actually contains three extraordinary stories, the primary one set against the lead up to World War One. The protagonist, Lieutenant Anton Hofmiller is an idealistic Austrian army officer
...more
Sharyl
Jun 28, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2016-reads
Here is a novel that would make for an interesting discussion...how much responsibility does anyone have for someone else's emotions? At what point does a situation become emotional blackmail? Who is being abused? How far would you compromise your life's path for the hope of making someone else happier?

Anthony Hoffmiller, a sad war hero, tells the tale of what transpired in his youth, something that led to the soul killing guilt that enabled him to not fear death during battle, that will make hi
...more
Jan
Jan 10, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"Beware of Pity" is a great psychological portrait of an officer in the Austrian army, right before the outbreak of the great war. At the outset, young Anton Hofmiller commits a terrible social gaffe by asking the crippled daughter of a local noble to dance, and it is in saving face that he embarks on a journey of pity, honor, and obligation, plunging ever deeper into her life and her family's.

Stefan Zweig paints an excellent portrait of a young man torn by conflicting feelings, constantly turni
...more
Roberto
Jul 12, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A great premise, though i'm not fully sure what Zweig was getting at about pity, especially during the context of the second world war when this was written. But this was a great, nerve-wracking, melodramatic, (it says 'feverish' on the jacket and that it is) read which starts off with a small, could-happen-to-anyone kinda incident and just builds and builds, slowly, logically until you are hurtling downhill fast, and there were bits which were agonising to read ughhh.

It is a masterclass of nar
...more
Dina Ezzat
Jun 28, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Pity. It had never occurred to me me what a double-edged feeling pity can be . Neither had I dwelled for long on the consequences of actions triggered by that feeling.. so unbelievably beautiful, yet very very painful ..so perfectly written that you feel guilty , that you question your morals , that you feel ache at your heart ..
and more beautifully it ended by that one thing I truly and strongly believe in " “No guilt is forgotten so long as the conscience still knows of it.” "
Sarah Rogers
Jan 02, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The doorman in my building (a Romanian named Moses) recommended this book to me. He told me "it is life."

After I read it, I understand what he meant. Everything in this book seems so familiar, even though it takes place in the early twentieth century, and revolves around an Austrian cavalry officer's relationship with a high society family. It fires off insight after insight into human psychology with every new revelation.

It's also beautifully written. You know how you tend to skim over sectio
...more
Tara
Aug 26, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“…I began to realize that it is not evil and brutality, but nearly always weakness, that is to blame for the worst things that happen in this world.”

4.5 stars.

Beware of Pity was a very thorough analysis of the often insidious nature of pity. The book explored the downward spiral of mutual wretchedness that can arise between the one who pities and the one pitied. The examination of the struggle that ensued when Hofmiller tried to force himself to love the creature he merely pitied, and the r
...more
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*spoiler* Edith 4 26 Dec 16, 2018 07:20AM  
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Stefan Zweig was one of the world's most famous writers during the 1920s and 1930s, especially in the U.S., South America, and Europe. He produced novels, plays, biographies, and journalist pieces. Among his most famous works are Beware of Pity, Letter from an Unknown Woman, and Mary, Queen of Scotland and the Isles. He and his second wife committed suicide in 1942.

Zweig studied in Austria, France
...more

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“No guilt is forgotten so long as the conscience still knows of it.” 154 likes
“There are two kinds of pity. One, the weak and sentimental kind, which is really no more than the heart's impatience to be rid as quickly as possible of the painful emotion aroused by the sight of another's unhappiness, that pity which is not compassion, but only an instinctive desire to fortify one's own soul agains the sufferings of another; and the other, the only one at counts, the unsentimental but creative kind, which knows what it is about and is determined to hold out, in patience and forbearance, to the very limit of its strength and even beyond.” 72 likes
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