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African Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean
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African Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean

3.54  ·  Rating details ·  35 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
In this study, the author has tried to incorporate the latest research on the economics of slavery and the demographic evolution of African slaves, as well as his own particular areas of investigation in his earlier work on Cuba, Brazil, and the Atlantic slave trade. He has also sought to summarize for the general reader much of the older research on Afro-American culture ...more
Paperback, 338 pages
Published May 19th 1988 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1986)
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Salvatore
Nov 08, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good quick look at the beginnings and endings of slavery in Latin America and parts of South America. It had some eye opening moments. Not all slave societies were the same. The differences depended on the expected outcome of the colonists.
Windy
Apr 04, 2009 rated it liked it
Shelves: own
The most difficult and informative history class I took in college was centered on slavery in Latin America. I've always been interested in the history of South America, and even though much of the course material wouldn't really help me if I ever taught a standard high school history course, this book was pretty informative, although it's almost as old as I am.
Thea
Jul 23, 2014 rated it it was ok
I am not a fan of the way this text is written; the tone is didactic, almost clinical, which can come across as unappealingly sterile. The author focuses heavily on demographics and economics. The result is a broadly informative piece, but one that lacks the pathos required to move the reader.
Brent
Apr 04, 2008 rated it really liked it
Very nice intro to/survey of the topic, good for an undergraduate class.
Melissa Jean
Very much focused on economics and demographics--little on the social, cultural history of slavery, which encompasses the most exciting research being done today on North and South American slavery.
Sean Chick
Aug 12, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The prose is dry, but direct and appropriately sparse. As an introduction to the subject I can't think of a better book.
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“These changes occurred just as the Spanish conquest of the Caribbean islands and the Portuguese settlement of the Brazilian subcontinent was getting under way and thus opened the American market for African slaves. The decimation of the native Arawak and Carib peoples in the Caribbean islands, the first major zone of European settlement, especially encouraged the early experimentation with African slave labor.” 0 likes
“Until the 1830s more Africans than Europeans crossed the Atlantic annually and as late as 1750 some 4.5 million of the estimated 6.6 million people who had come to the Americas since 1492 were African slaves.” 0 likes
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