Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Jane and Prudence” as Want to Read:
Jane and Prudence
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Jane and Prudence

3.87  ·  Rating details ·  2,557 Ratings  ·  317 Reviews
If Jane Cleveland and Prudence Bates seem an unlikely pair to be walking together at an Oxford reunion, neither of them are aware of it. They couldn't be more different: Jane is a rather incompetent vicar's wife, who always looks as if she is about to feed the chickens, while Prudence, a pristine hothouse flower, has the most unsuitable affairs. With the move to a rural pa ...more
Paperback, 222 pages
Published September 1st 1999 by Moyer Bell (first published 1953)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Jane and Prudence, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Jane and Prudence

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Teresa
Jul 08, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is the first book I've read by Pym and on that basis alone, I will say she is in the tradition of Jane Austen (the main character's Emma Woodhouse comment acknowledges this), Trollope (whom the character Jane is a reader of) and even Gaskell's Cranford. While reading, I also couldn't help but compare Pym to her contemporary, Muriel Spark. But what a contrast that is -- while Spark mercilessly spears us with her stiletto, Pym gently skewers us.

I loved the character of Jane, what she says and
...more
Bruce
May 29, 2010 rated it really liked it
After less than ten pages I found myself chuckling more than once on each page, the dialogue, both internal and interpersonal, is so droll and delightfully dated, so incisive and mannered, yet at the same time so fresh and honest. Pym has an acute ear for both the commonplace and the minutely particular. Very witty, indeed. And the entertainment never flagged.

Jane is the 41-year-old former Oxford tutor now married happily to an Anglican clergyman; she is a less than ideal clergyman’s wife, howev
...more
Wealhtheow
May 03, 2007 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: fans of Austen
Shelves: historical
Pym writes loneliness, the urban/modern condition, and humanity’s oft mistaken attempts at communication and companionship very well. Given that her characters are generally overlooked middle-aged people clinging quietly but desperately to a pretense of gentility, one might assume her stories are unhappy. Of course parts of them are, but I get the feeling that her characters are happier by the end of her novels than at the start. They definitely progress, toward intimacy with another person(s) o ...more
Sarah
Aug 15, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Jane and Prudence lead very different lives.

Jane is married to a kindly vicar and her life is concerned with their children and parish. She is outspoken and often causes problems with her tactless, but good-hearted, interference.

Prudence is single, elegant and has a habit of preferring unsatisfactory affairs. She has a research job which she finds dull and her boredom is relieved by crushes on unsuitable men. Her office colleagues add amusement to the story as they compete and gossip.

Jane and P
...more
Kelly
Oct 10, 2016 rated it liked it
Review included in my fall/winter roundup on my blog: https://shouldacouldawouldabooks.com/...
Tony
Apr 18, 2012 rated it it was amazing
20. JANE AND PRUDENCE. (1953). Barbara Pym. ****+.
This is another early novel by Ms. Pym that features another “excellent woman” as one of the principal characters – Jane. Jane is married to a clergyman who is soon assigned to a church in a village just beyond London. Jane is sorry to give up her London residence and her close proximity to Prudence, a younger woman who is still unmarried, though she has managed to accumulate a number of ‘romances.’ Jane immediately falls into the role of a mini
...more
Antonomasia
[3.5] A very good example of the kind of thing it is - genteel, slightly humourous story of 1950s ladies - but it's not quite my kind of thing. I'd suspected this is what Barbara Pym - and also the entire output of blog-favourite boutique publisher Persephone Books - would be like, whilst faintly hoping she might turn out as satirical as Stella Gibbons. So although Pym has been widely recommended, I'd never sought out her books... but holiday cottages always seem to have at least one Virago Mode ...more
Isa
Jul 31, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: leo-autoras
4,5
En esta novela conocemos a Jane y Prudence. Jane fue profesora de Prudence y desde aquella época se han hecho muy amigas. Son dos mujeres muy distintas, no solamente por la diferencia de edad sino también por su personalidad. Jane fue profesora y ahora es la esposa del vicario, con el que tiene una hija que está en plena adolescencia. Prudente, es todo lo contrario de su amiga, soltera y muy independiente. A Jane le preocupa, y mucho, la soltería de us amiga y es cuando empieza a comportarse
...more
Jemidar
Apr 24, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: english-authors

More like 4.5 stars.



Dear Simran,

This book was very good and I enjoyed it very much. I think you should read it.

Kindest Regards,

Jemidar
Shawn Mooney
Mar 31, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2017
While I didn't love this as much as Pym's first two novels, it was still a delight. Here again Pym softly skewers mid-20th-century British notions of gender, class, religion, sex, and whatnot. Jane—perfectly summed up in the blurb as "an incompetent vicar's wife, who always looks like she's about to feed the chickens" was richly drawn; her younger, sexually-liberated friend Prudence did not come as alive on the page, I didn't think.
Daniela
Sep 14, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 20s-to-60s
This is the story of Jane - a scatty clergyman's wife who has just moved to a country parish, and her former student Prudence - beautiful, single and hopping from one hopeless love affair to the next. When Prudence visits her friend at her new home, Jane is determined to finally find a suitable husband for her. But match-making is not as easy as it seems...

I have heard Barbara Pym being compared to both Jane Austen (whose books I love) and Muriel Spark (whose books I don't), so I was curious wha
...more
Marissa
Nov 21, 2008 rated it liked it
I've been reading Barbara Pym's books in order, so this is our third. :) I wasn't quite as smitten with it as with Some Tame Gazelle and Excellent Women--it seemed somehow to lack some vim . . . not that "vim" is an idea you'd associate with any of her books, but still.

Jane and Prudence seemed somewhat of a more bitter book than the first two, and there was definitely a stronger, more unhappy current of feminism running through it. The first two books seemed to say, "Oh, those dear boys, what wo
...more
Elizabeth
Sep 26, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Austen fans and feminists
British author Barbara Pym is a treasure. Initially, her books seem like dry, straight-forward accounts of spinsters and ministers' wives. Very civilized and detailed, the plots weave in and out of the different characters' thoughts as they unfold.
Set close to the WWII period, this book was seemingly paced more slowly within a more simple world. The heroines and friends, Jane and Prudence are both warped as they struggle to adapt to an environment that just doesn't fit....
Sly, subtle writing.
Lisa
Jan 22, 2009 rated it it was amazing
This book had many of the same characters and the same setting as Crampton Hodnet. The story and characters were just as witty and real, however, I found it didn't have so many of the great little asides and observations as Crampton Hodnet, and the ending left me a bit unsatisfied. I could so relate to one of the main characters, Jane. She is a clegymans wife who was a literary major in college, wrote a book about 17th century poetry, and had no idea how to deal with a household, cooking, cleani ...more
Katerina
Отложите эту книжку на лето и читайте ее с легким сердцем, тогда история про то, как Джейн хочет выдать замуж свою подругу Пруденс, приятно вас позабавит пару вечеров. Джейн - суетливая, добродушная, по-бриджитджонсовски бесшабашная жена священника - ужасно мила, а на Пруденс, с ее зелеными тенями, роковым образом и подходящими цитатами в письмах, уже самой хочется жениться, и везде сплошные прекрасные сценки за чаем и без него (чай, между прочим, спасает от ссор, холода, социальной неловкости и ...more
Lady Drinkwell
Jan 16, 2016 rated it it was amazing
A lovely little bit of Pym. I adored the character of Jane particularly, a rather disorganized and inept vicars wife who gets on with life the best she can. It is refreshing to see such characters back in the conventional 50s when every housewife was supposed to have whiter than white washing. There are some extremely funny moments, comments and social situations which are still true to life today. A very cosy book to read as the days get shorter.
Trelawn
This was an easy, enjoyable read in the style of Cranford. The story revoles around Jane, a middle aged clergyman's wife, and her young spinster friend Prudence. Jane tries to be a dutiful wife of the sort in Trollope's Barchester novels but finds real life falls short of fiction. Prudence meanwhile embarks on a series of mostly fanciful romances with highly unsuitable men while a suitable candidate is right under her nose. A cosy story of village life and the goings on of it's inhabitants.
Ali
Jan 25, 2009 rated it really liked it
Jane Cleveland and Prudence Bates first knew one another at Oxford, Jane some years older than Prudence had once been her tutor. Now Jane is married to Nicholas an Anglian clergyman and has a daughter also bound for Oxford. Prudence, however an attractive twenty nine year old is still a spinster. Jane and her family move to a new country parish, where Jane with her odd clothes and her wry view of life has to play a part she feels vaguely unequal to. Her husband’s predecessor and his wife were re ...more
Alana
May 14, 2007 rated it liked it
Shelves: reviewed, 2009_05_may
There's something quietly lovely about a Barbara Pym novel. It's a perfect rainy day read, as you imagine yourself in England... if you have a large chintz armchair, all the better. And while I don't think you need to adore Jane Austen in order to enjoy Barbara Pym, it probably helps, though there's something a little darker and more melancholy in Pym.

Jane and Prudence unsurprisingly deals with two Englishwomen named Jane and Prudence. (As a result, I was singing "Dear Prudence" over the three o
...more
Lavinia
Jun 14, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, in-en, 2017
This lady brings me so much joy and comfort. Not only are her books funny, but they tackle very serious issues: relationships (beware! spinsterhood!), religion and feminism. This particular one, poetry as well. And tea, lots and lots of tea.
Kathryn
Aug 07, 2010 rated it liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore
Revisit. This was another delightful read from Barbara Pym who I “discovered” thanks to my book group. This one is the story of Jane Cleveland, a country vicar’s wife who is kind hearted, slightly eccentric, and far from the “ideal” vicar’s wife―she is not a particularly good housekeeper, can’t cook (beyond opening a tin), seems to say the wrong things and makes quite a few faux pas, but is loved by and loves her family (husband and daughter), leading a rather happy life. Up at Oxford she was tu ...more
Bettie☯
Jun 15, 2013 rated it liked it
Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym

radio 4x
pub 1953
summer 2013
dramatisation (masterful!)

1: Unconventional 1950s vicar's wife Jane arrives in a new parish, keen to marry off ex-pupil Prudence. Barbara Pym's delightful comedy of rural relationships stars Emma Fielding.
2: Vicar's wife Jane looks around her new parish, while Prudence nurses an unrequited love for her employer. Comedy of rural relationships stars Susie Blake.
3: The life of the village is beginning to be revealed, and Jane receives an i
...more
Leslie
Nov 30, 2010 rated it really liked it
Funny, sharp, utterly unsentimental: all good things. Two intelligent, well-educated women in postwar England without very much to do with their intelligence or their education. Of the two title characters, Jane is the more likeable, if likeability matters to you. She's entering middle age, adjusting herself to the idea that this is her life--wife to a country vicar, mother to a young woman just heading off to Oxford (where her mother also attended and was briefly a tutor at the women's college, ...more
Diane
Jul 24, 2015 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
"Jane and Prudence" is the story of two very different friends - Jane is in her early 40s, married to a clergyman, and the mother of an 18-year-old daughter, and Prudence is 29 years old, single, and works in an office. Neither of them is truly happy. Jane secretly envies her friend's independence and career (such as it is), and regrets giving up her youthful literary ambitions. For her part, Prudence dreams of being married, though she keeps falling for men who are totally wrong for her.

I had
...more
Kathleen
Apr 07, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I bought this book in England. I think it's the 3rd Barbara Pym book that I've read. This book revolves around an Episcopal priest's wife and her younger single friend. I like to read about England in the 1950's and the Church of England - high church/low church. Because I attend a high church, I now understand the vocabulary. This book helps me to think about being married and being single. I was single for many years - dating and not dating - never easy! Now, I'm married - I see the other side ...more
Jane
Jan 04, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Published in 1953 when Pym was at the height of her powers, here we find two old friends from their Oxford days; Jane - a vicar's wife - and Prudence - single, beautiful, and infatuated with the distracted academic she works for. This is a woman's world, as Jane thinks early in the novel, and men are really there as a backdrop. Here we have the spotless dialogue, the sly humour, the sharply drawn little world that Pym both knew and created so exquisitely. Jane wants to find Prudence a husband, a ...more
Theresa
May 23, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kindle
A lovely book for a re-read, especially after such a long time since the first read. Life lessons, slyly told, abound in this social comedy where the drama is subtle. Pym certainly understood human nature and self-absorbtion. This passage about Fabian struck me particularly: "He had just realised that the distinguished-looking man sitting at that distant table was himself reflected in a mirror at the far end of the room. No wonder one had had to hurt people, he thought..."
Carla Remy
Apr 22, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: vintage-brit-lit
Barbara Pym is one of the most readable writers ever. Her prose rolls off the page like candy. True, very little actually happens in her books. There is an endless focus on the Church of England, the tension between high and low church. But religion in her world is a social institution more than anything. This is not the first time I've read "Jane and Prudence." It's not one of my favorites of hers, but it's still delectably readable.
Hilary
Nov 23, 2015 added it
Another lovely Barbara Pym. Witty and touching,lovely characters, A look into a bygone era of the English village when life revolved around the vicarage, politeness, tea and cucumber sandwiches and the occasional raised eyebrow, even Fabian the womaniser does it in an awfully polite way !
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Play Book Tag: Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym 3 stars 1 6 Jul 03, 2017 05:35PM  
Play Book Tag: Jane and Prudence/Barbara Pym - 2 stars 1 8 Dec 31, 2016 01:44PM  
Barbara Pym 9 18 Mar 05, 2014 08:04AM  
how to live your life 2 21 Oct 17, 2009 06:15PM  
  • The Soul of Kindness
  • One Fine Day
  • This Real Night
  • Elizabeth and Her German Garden
  • A Far Cry from Kensington
  • The Lost Traveller
  • Invitation to the Waltz
  • High Rising
  • A Very Great Profession
  • Nightingale Wood
  • Mrs. Miniver
  • The Brontës Went to Woolworths
  • The Diary of a Provincial Lady
  • Sisters By a River
  • Henrietta's War: News from the Home Front 1939-1942
  • The Rector's Daughter
104015
After studying English at St Hilda's College, Oxford, she served in the Women's Royal Naval Service during World War II.

The turning point for Pym came with a famous article in the Times Literary Supplement in which two prominent names, Lord David Cecil and Philip Larkin, nominated her as the most underrated writer of the century. Pym and Larkin had kept up a private correspondence over a period o
...more
More about Barbara Pym...

Share This Book

“Once outside the magic circle the writers became their lonely selves, pondering on poems, observing their fellow men ruthlessly, putting people they knew into novels; no wonder they were without friends.” 8 likes
“I love Evensong. There's something sad and essentially English about it.” 7 likes
More quotes…