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The Science of Cheese

3.72  ·  Rating details ·  104 ratings  ·  19 reviews
In an engaging tour of the science and history of cheese, Michael Tunick explores the art of cheese making, the science that lies underneath the deliciousness, and the history behind how humanity came up with one of its most varied and versatile of foods.
Dr. Tunick spends his everyday deep within the halls of the science of cheese, as a researcher who creates new dairy pr
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Hardcover, 281 pages
Published December 30th 2013 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published January 1st 2013)
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Ocean Gebhardt
Mar 26, 2017 rated it really liked it
A bit too scientific for me, but great overall if you're interested in learning more about cheese.
Kathy Sebesta
Jul 15, 2017 rated it did not like it
Shelves: could-not-finish
yawn Yawn YAWN ZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Mark
Oct 04, 2013 rated it really liked it
Fascinating, in-depth look into the world of cheese.

The best way to describe this book is perhaps to call it an "Encyclopedia of Cheese." It is filled with scientific discussions, table after table of data and information, and dozens of sidebars of interesting tidbits ranging from historical, cultural, and scientific anecdotes. Just because it is comprehensive and scientific does not at all mean it is dry and flat. Quite to the contrary there is much in here that is very interesting, informative
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Ron
Jul 23, 2018 rated it liked it
Do you eat cheese? Depending upon where you live, you are likely to eat some sort of cheese. And the variety of cheese is staggering! France alone has 400 varieties. Take a look at the following link of the Monty Python Cheese Shop sketch - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPN3K...
- for some of the variety of cheese eaten in England.

Michael Tunick (a research chemist at USDA) provides a brief history of cheese alongside an examination of the cheese-making process with the chemistry that creates
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Silas
Dec 19, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I was excited to learn about cheeses and how they come to be with this book, and while I did learn a good bit, it was much more technical than I had hoped, and really not suited to the audiobook format. It grouped cheeses into how they are cured, and then talked about various alcohols, esters, bacteria, and molds that are used to make individual cheeses. It was very specific, but would have worked better in text rather than narration, and with that level of detail, was ultimately rather dry.
Georgios
Oct 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I received this book via Goodreads first reads program.
The book is like an encyclopedia of Cheese.
It has scientific terms, but nothing too difficult.
It is a good gift for cheese lovers or in food stores.

I like this kind of books to have them in my library
Paul
Jun 21, 2017 rated it liked it
I like cheese. This book was a bit too template-like...but now I appreciate cheese more.
Caitlin Stewart
I received a copy of this through the Goodreads first reads program and was really excited when it came in the mail - I love cheese and I'm a scientist, win!

I should mention I'm not a chemist and have no experience working in food science, so although I'm used to reading about some of these terms and about bacteria/fungi in general, I didn't know most of the material discussed in the book beforehand.

There was much more hard science than I was expecting in this book, lots of specific informatio
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Csrabb
Jan 01, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: i-recommend
"Science, Humor, Education and Brilliance"

Would you consider the audio edition of The Science of Cheese to be better than the print version?
I am blind so the Audio version is my choice. I have read thousands of books over the years. I found that Dennis Holland, the narrator of this book to be one of the top readers I have come across. I think that he understands what he is reading and he especially has portrayed the ideas of the author if fine form.


Who was your favorite character and why?
Michae
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Mark
Sep 13, 2014 rated it really liked it
How can you govern a country that has 246 varieties of cheese?" -- Charles de Gaulle

Tunick has no advice for de Gaulle but he has figured out how to write a delightful book about cheese and the artistry of "bacteria wrangling" that produces it in all its glory. The author is a scientist with the USDA and clearly really likes cheese. I think he's being a little coy about his opinions on unpasteurized cheese sale restrictions in the US, given his employer. And a copy editor introduced an extra car
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Samuel Brown
May 27, 2014 rated it liked it
A strange book on a great topic. In format it felt like someone had printed out a blog using Internet Explorer and then bound it in cloth. Once you get over the problem with medium, though, it's a pleasantly nerdy introduction to the scientific side of cheese with some occasional folk tales about history or medicine as they abut cheese. Reading it made me miss my grandfather, who was a cheese scientist at Minnesota, and I thought about how much I'd like to spend a couple weeks with him in his la ...more
Nicole
Jul 15, 2014 rated it it was amazing
The first few chapters have some of the coolest random facts... I have shared the barn-paint fact with practically everyone I have come in contact with. It gets a little dry in the later chapters, because it is talking more specific and sciencey. I am not... I read the book as a hobby, so I didn't understand most of the big words and stuff, but it was written so that it is understandable without that knowledge. I do hope to learn more about this topic, so as to understand this book more. I reall ...more
S.E. Smith
Jul 09, 2014 rated it did not like it
I was really hoping for a much more dynamic, interesting book on cheese -- which is a fascinating subject, for those of us cheese eaters. Instead, what I got was an intensely dry, self-referential read that was, honestly, incredibly boring. Much of the book covered subjects I already know with an approach that resembled an agricultural manual, and the book really didn't get into subjects like terroir in detail.

If you want to know the basics of how cheese is made, great. If you want to know abou
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Zachary A
Jul 21, 2015 rated it it was amazing
so good i ate it all up! i'm not sure what more the author could have included. perhaps a little dubious in support of nutritional benefits of cheese. yes, there are many nutritional benefits but the author says the jury is out on cholesterol and saturated fat. really? i'm pretty sure the sugar and sodium could also be a problem. the bias is understandable given the author and the nature of the book. overall excellent.
Crystal
Mar 17, 2015 rated it it was amazing
A very interesting read. I wish I could have it for longer but it must return to the library for someone else to read.
Mills College Library
637.3 T9266 2014
Zach
May 02, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2016, food, cheese, non-fiction
Apparently I got really bad at checking books off of my currently reading list...
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