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Tarzan of the Apes (Tarzan #1)

3.88  ·  Rating details ·  33,213 Ratings  ·  2,035 Reviews
In 1888 Lord and Lady Clayton sail from England but to West Africa and perish on a remote island. When their infant son is adopted by fanged, great anthropoid apes, he is Tarzan of the Apes. His intelligence and caring mother raise him to be king. Self-educated by his parents’ library, Tarzan rescues genteel Jane Porter from the perils of his jungle.
Audio CD, 8 pages
Published February 15th 2006 by Books In Motion (first published October 1912)
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Rory In terms of adventure stories similar I would say Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World. (which also came out…moreIn terms of adventure stories similar I would say Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World. (which also came out the same year as this).(less)
Michael A Farkas Yes, Jane is in the first two books, although her parts in the other 23 books are very small (other than mentioning Tarzan going home to her). I read…moreYes, Jane is in the first two books, although her parts in the other 23 books are very small (other than mentioning Tarzan going home to her). I read all the books over 25 years ago and this is the best I remember it. Hope it helps.(less)
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Will Byrnes
Apr 10, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy
Viscount Greystoke will see you now.
One of the advantages of riding the subway to work is getting extra reading time. Coming home, though, I often have to stand for a good while before I can get a seat. As it is not comfortable wrangling the actual book I am reading at a given time while standing, I lift my trusty iTouch and am able to read a bit until the crowd thins. I save my hardcore reading for when I am sitting and can take notes. iTouch reading is of a different sort, at least it has b
...more
Lyn
Apr 09, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Tarzan of the Apes was a pulp classic that spawned a slew of sequels, movies, radio and television shows and a community in California.

I was surprised, pleasantly by the style of writing, Edgar Rice Burroughs was a talented craftsman, and I am amazed at his ability to again and again draw the reader into a cliffhanger situation.

A good read.

description
Whitaker
Pulp fiction at its best.

I went in with low expectations and enjoyed it more than I thought I would. It's pulp fiction, but it's good pulp: a fun romp and so very very silly. Burroughs buys into all the prejudices of his time, but it's tough to blame him for being merely mortal. Ignore it. He's no worse than JM Barrie or Kipling.

I've shelved it under Fantasy, and that's what it is. There may be no Middle Earth or magic, but a novel where a child brought up among apes learns to read without hum
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Vane J.


Remember this?



I liked that movie when I was younger. Being the bookworm I am, as soon as I found out it was based in a book, I wanted to read it, thinking what I'm sure most of us think when a book has movies: "Surely it is better". And since the movie I knew is Disney's, then my second thought was: "It's gonna be hella different to the movie, and maybe even a childhood ruiner".

Only the second of my thoughts was right. Because Tarzan of the Apes is almost like an ode to insta-love and, above al
...more
Fabian
Jan 20, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Here: the fountainhead & the story buried below a myriad adaptations.

E. R. Burroughs's dream did come true after all: his Tarzan spun off into countless later tales & films-- heck, even Broadway musicals. Read this scant but brutal adventure tale with its due respect, for it includes: examples of poetic and natural justice; often tableaux with two male warrior bodies battling it out--always a spectacle to behold; cannibalism; animal eroticism; killer! savage! hot!-ness; plot twists and
...more
J.G. Keely
I must say, I was expecting more from this book. It takes inspiration from a wide array of very good adventure novels, but manages to be more bigoted than the colonial literature that inspired it and less factual and forward-looking than books written thirty years before.

One of the major inspirations is H. Rider Haggard's early pulp adventure stories, including the tales of Allan Quatermain. Like Tarzan, these stories take place in the depths of colonial Africa, but the attitudes and portrayal o
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John Conrad
Feb 23, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: young and old
Recommended to John by: my big brothers
Ah, how to begin... Tarzan raised me from a little boy and helped me become a man. After the Bobsey Twins, Hardy Boys, and, yes, Nancy Drew, I admit, came Tarzan, Return of Tarzan, Beasts of Tarzan, Son of Tarzan, Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar,... yes 24 in all, and then the Mars series, and Moon, and Venus, and Pellucidar, I own over 65 Edgar Rice Burroughs books, but Tarzan was an inspriation to me, so I have to give the credit to this book, despite its flaws, for many happy hours of reading. ...more
Celise
I feel like I've been waiting for a book like this my entire life, and here it was all this time, published long before I was even born.

Is the light cast upon race and gender in this novel wrong and inappropriate? Most definitely. However, I read this book ignoring these things, not out of ignorance as the word would imply, but with an acceptance of the flaws, and deciding instead to fall in love with the adventure and the horrible violence of Tarzan's growing up in the jungle. I didn't read thi
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Jason Pettus
(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally.)

The CCLaP 100: In which I read for the first time a hundred "classic" books, then write essays on whether or not they still deserve the label

Book #25: Tarzan of the Apes, by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1914)

The story in a nutshell:
Set in the last great days of the British Empire (i.e. the first decades of
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David
Feb 14, 2011 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, classics
Things I love:

1. Tarzan puts both a lion and a gorilla in a full-nelson.
2. Tarzan taught himself to read. From a dictionary.
3. He dug up pirates' treasure even though he didn't see any purpose for it, just because he didn't like them.
4. Tarzan learned French in about two weeks from a wounded French soldier.

Things I don't love:

1. Tarzan grew up shaving with a knife. Even though he had never seen a human until grown, he knew it was unseemly to have hair on one's face like an ape.
2. When he co
...more
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Edgar Rice Burroughs was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic John Carter, although he produced works in many genres.
More about Edgar Rice Burroughs...

Other Books in the Series

Tarzan (1 - 10 of 27 books)
  • The Return of Tarzan (Tarzan, #2)
  • The Beasts of Tarzan (Tarzan, #3)
  • The Son of Tarzan (Tarzan, #4)
  • Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar (Tarzan, #5)
  • Jungle Tales of Tarzan (Tarzan, #6)
  • Tarzan the Untamed (Tarzan, #7)
  • Tarzan the Terrible (Tarzan, #8)
  • Tarzan and the Golden Lion (Tarzan, #9)
  • Tarzan and the Ant Men (Tarzan, #10)
  • Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle (Tarzan, #11)
“I do not understand exactly what you mean by fear," said Tarzan. "Like lions, fear is a different thing in different men, but to me the only pleasure in the hunt is the knowledge that the hunted thing has power to harm me as much as I have to harm him. If I went out with a couple of rifles and a gun bearer, and twenty or thirty beaters, to hunt a lion, I should not feel that the lion had much chance, and so the pleasure of the hunt would be lessened in proportion to the increased safety which I felt."

"Then I am to take it that Monsieur Tarzan would prefer to go naked into the jungle, armed only with a jackknife, to kill the king of beasts," laughed the other good naturedly, but with the merest touch of sarcasm in his tone.

"And a piece of rope," added Tarzan.”
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“The time has arrived when patience becomes a crime and mayhem appears garbed in a manner of virtue” 40 likes
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