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The Fallen Snow

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A gripping tale of self-exploration and atonement, emotionally complex and brimming with grit.

In the fall of 1918 infantry sniper Joshua Hunter saves an ambushed patrol in the Bois le Prêtre forest of Lorraine . . . and then vanishes. Pulled from the rubble of an enemy bunker days later, he receives an award for valor and passage home to Hadley, a remote hamlet in Virginia’s western highlands. Reeling from war and influenza, Hadley could surely use a hero. Family and friends embrace him; an engagement is announced; a job is offered.

Yet all is not what it seems. Joshua experiences panics and can’t recall the incident that crippled him. He guards a secret too, one that grips tight like the icy air above his father’s quarry. Over the course of a Virginia winter and an echoed season in war-torn France, The Fallen Snow reveals his wide-eyed journey to the front and his ragged path back. Along the way he finds companions – a youth mourning a lost brother, a widowed nurse seeking a new life and Aiden, a bold sergeant escaping a vengeful father. While all of them touch Joshua, it is the strong yet nurturing Aiden who will awaken his heart, leaving him forever changed.

Set within a besieged Appalachian forest during a time of tragedy, The Fallen Snow charts an extraordinary coming of age, exploring how damaged souls learn to heal, and dare to grow.

318 pages, Paperback

First published December 18, 2012

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About the author

John J. Kelley

1 book19 followers
John Kelley is a fiction writer crafting tales about healing, growth and community. Born and raised in the Florida panhandle, he graduated from Virginia Tech and for a time served as a military officer. Today John lives with his partner in Washington, DC, where he can often be found wandering Rock Creek Park when not hovering over his laptop at a local coffee shop.

John’s debut novel recounts the struggle of a young WWI sniper returning to a Virginia community reeling from war, influenza and economic collapse. The Fallen Snow recently received a Publishers Weekly starred review and earned an Honorable Mention nod at the ForeWord Reviews Book-of-the-Year Awards.

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5 stars
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123 (36%)
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77 (22%)
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Displaying 1 - 30 of 72 reviews
Profile Image for Bookwatcher .
746 reviews120 followers
April 20, 2013
“All blood runs red.”
― Phrase painted on the side of the plane flown by Eugene Bullard


When I read the book's blurb I was uncertain if I want to read it.
The Fallen Snow explores the emotional journey of a young infantry sniper returning to a remote mountain community reeling from war, influenza and economic collapse
It's a strong theme... and I KNEW it would be hard to read.
And it was.... but I'm glad I'm stubborn and when something call me, as this story did, I go on... and read up to the last page.

This is not just one story... but two. You will read Joshua (the veteran) story in the present and his past (flashbacks), and also his mother's POV, Elisabeth. I can't decide which one I liked most... what was worst, live through hell as Joshua did during war or be the one trying to keep a family together, when the patriarch is dying (Joshua father is very sick)?

Why two, and so different point of view? I have a theory.. maybe I'm wrong, but it's just a theory... they are dealing with the same feelings... mourning. Elisabeth still have his husband, but she is already mourning... and Joshua is mourning the lost of his biggest and maybe only love of his live... a man he lost during war.

Some precautions... this is an unconventional romance, but it's a very touch love story. I can't and will not talk about Joshua and his lover, you must discover it, one flashback at time, as I did. It was what keep me reading... I knew Joshua was alone, but I didn't knew how he lost his lover, and who he was... so I can't ruin the book talking about it.
Don't read it searching for a painless romance. Each page is a stab in your heart. The book first scene is Joshua, with his broke body and spirit, arriving in his hometown. He want to go on, do the right thing, don't think... about his pain and suffering. Elisabeth is exactly like him... happy his son is alive and back she don't care for his injury, his broke soul, he is back... nothing else matters.

The fact it's a historical book there will be also some facts from USA, late 1918, like the pandemic flu and more... I added a quote to this review... it's about equality and war... and in this book there is not just the fact Joshua is one of the best soldier or his regiment, exactly like any man there, no distinction about sex orientation or religion... and neither skin color. There is a secondary character in this story, adding a great contribute to show how African Americans fight and die there too. (footnote: remember it's before the Black Power movement of the 1960s, when the term black was favored as the term to express racial pride. Negro has dropped out of favor and now seems out of date or even offensive in both US and British English, but in the book it's used, by all, including the secondary character talking about himself and his war comrades).

From women rights (there is near the end a sorrow note, Joshua will think about a woman and I didn't miss it... women at that time had to marry, have kids, nothing more were expected from them)... religious prejudice against homosexuals (not very deep, but it's there).... race prejudice (the black character will told you, how he and his regiment comrades were trained to war... or better said, used as human bait and lead to a slaughter?)... to unconditional love.

I was mesmerize and terrorized... but also eager to read all, each page, and see if lost souls could find new goals to their lives.

Even if I was 90% of the time sad reading this book, it also gave a lot to think about.. about love... unconditional love that has no bounds and is unchanging... true love. Eternal love.

5 stars and keep Kleenex near you... you will need it, but will not regret to read it. Be brave, and try it too.

P.S: I liked the epilogue and the historical notes. It's hard to find something I dislike in this book, but there is one: all the flashbacks written in Italic. Some are long, and read pages and pages of italic is not pleasant IMO.
Profile Image for PaperMoon.
1,324 reviews52 followers
February 10, 2020
The book opens with Joshua Hunter, great war survivor, returning home to the Appalachian mountains to his home and community. He’s wounded both physically and psychologically – his nerves (what we now call PTSD) are shot to pieces and his memories are fragmented and fleeting. The small mountain community of Hadley is all to glad to have him back alive – his mother Elizabeth is ecstatic, his younger brother Scott is only too glad to have someone else in the family home as buffer / runner between feuding parents, Wayne his father is impatient for Josh to take over the family business, and Katie the childhood sweetheart left behind is keen to restart what she and Josh had going before.

What all the Hadley folks don’t realise is that they getting back someone who is no longer whom they sent off. Through his wartime experiences – Joshua is irrevocably changed and much as he wants to fit back into some semblance of civilian life – his dreams, painful memories and deep secrets stand in the way.

Being too tied up in his own mind and worries, Josh also fails to recognise that much has changed in his community and family since he left. Economic/ industry and ecological battles loom as federal forces consider how to preserve as much of the mountainous terrain and forests before straitened landowners sell up to greedy developers/loggers. Hadley’s young people struggle to adjust to a world and future which afford them moving away from home and into the cities for employment – they also have braver dreams, wider opportunities/choices and more career/work options than the generation before. Older folk take stock of their lives and their shattered dreams as they look at a dying way of life around their township. Josh’s family face personal health concerns just as death/injury lie just around the corner for those who work in a mining industry with less than ideal safety standards.

This amazing tale is about surviving. Josh has survived the war but can he find the support and inner strength to survive coming back home as a civilian. Is Josh’s family able to look beyond their expectations and hopes for the elder son to give him the space and time to heal, reflect and grow into a post-war manhood. The author cleverly alternates Joshua’s wartime experiences (in the form of recollections and dreams) interjected between his current struggles with life at Hadley; secondary and supporting characters are neatly split for the most part between the Appalachian-setting (now) and countryside France (war). Most memorable of these characters to me are of course Josh’s commanding officer Aiden, the army nurse Claire and Elizabeth Hunter (mother) – who all have deep and long lasting impact on Joshua in so many ways.

There is a gay romance component to this tale of course but the sexual activity is alluded to but not detailed graphically – the desire, fulfillment and loss is so nicely depicted … and since Joshua is all of age 19 by the time he returns from war – there is all that first-love fragility and wondrous innocence which really appeals to me. However, there's also the foreboding build-up throughout the chapters climaxing at what exactly happened in that single afternoon event which shattered Joshua's body and world.

Can I assert here that this is a ‘growing up’ / maturing tale and there is no HEA as per standard-format gay romances. However, the ending is fiercely courageous and stalwartly hopeful – not just for Joshua, but for those significant others in his life; when direction, purpose and meaning comes after the shattering aftermath of truth revealed – and clarity on just what is important becomes distilled in the wake of a snowstorm-enveloped mountain scene.

The telling of this fantastic tale moved me deeply as I was strongly emotionally invested for almost all main characters – a highly recommended read. The book has a remarkably strong sense of time and place. Find out more at the author website: http://www.thefallensnow.com/
Profile Image for Harry Lane.
940 reviews12 followers
February 3, 2013
This was a slow read in the best way. Kelley's prose is evocative, creating a sense of place. He builds tension from the very first, and it includes the contrast of war and peace, conflict between fathers and sons, and indeed the trials of finding one's true self. By the time you approach the end, you have to wonder how, or whether, things will all work out. Kelley's resolutions are touching, but without artifice. I am very glad to have gotten this book as a Goodreads giveaway.
Profile Image for J.D..
231 reviews
February 13, 2013
I bought this book with no pre-conceived expectations of the story but mainly because I grew up in the area it took place. (Virginia highlands of course, not France) What a pleasant surprise I was in for. The first chapter begins with Josh returning home from WWI with a war injury and obviously PTSD. The chapters go back and forth between trying to fit back in at home after experiencing war and recollections of Paris, army life and battles. I was mesmerized from the beginning reading through the weekend to get to the conclusion. Without giving any secrets away, I'll end by saying this book reminds me that as much as things have changed since 1918, other things haven't changed at all. I interrupted reading another book to read The Fallen Snow; at least put it on your "next to read" list. Then read it next!!!
2 reviews
January 31, 2013
Mr. Kelley's novel richly describes a young soldier's return home to Virginia after serving on the battlefields of France during WWI. The soldier's life is forever altered by the tragedies of war, and by a relationship that is beautiful in its subtlety. While the descriptions of the French countryside and wartime Paris are good, one of the novel's greatest strengths is the way it brings to life the forests and highlands of western Virginia and the characters who call the area home. There are histories within histories in this novel. Fans of historical fiction, or those who just appreciate good storytelling, should read this promising new author.
Profile Image for Melissa.
963 reviews43 followers
May 8, 2013
I really enjoyed this book! I very rarely give a book 5 stars but I think this one deserves it. This is John J Kelley's debut novel but I never felt like I was reading a debut novel. From the moment I first started reading it I was hooked and wanted to know what Joshua was going through and what had happened to him in the war to make him feel as he did.

This book does carry a sad overtone to it throughout the entire book but it is well written so it hits the right note without being overly weepy and lets the story shine through instead of being swallowed up entirely by the sadness. Joshua & Aiden's story together and Joshua's on his own are such a moving story.

The settings and feel of the places the story put in were also very well done, you really get the feel for where they are at without it detracting from what the characters are doing.

Some may not like the way the book transitions back and forth between the two time periods but I thought it was very well done without being confusing.

I am so glad that one of my groups theme this month was World War I otherwise this book would have sat on my kindle for a while before I read it and that would have been a real shame.


Profile Image for Linda ~ they got the mustard out! ~.
1,519 reviews97 followers
August 25, 2018
This is a not an m/m, though one of the main characters is gay. This is post-WWI and has flashbacks to the son's service in the war, where he fell in love with a commanding officer. It's a thoughtfully written story and focuses on character development. The settings and characters come alive as you read; I felt like I was there, in those mountains, living those characters lives. Very few authors are able to do that.
Profile Image for Marq.
113 reviews1 follower
February 24, 2013
Fantastic. This is a book that will be read in literature classes, 200 years from now. Very well written and Kelly has set a very high bar for his next.
Please hurry.
Profile Image for Gerry Burnie.
Author 8 books27 followers
March 13, 2013
Gerry B's Book Reviews

4.5 bees

Review by Gerry Burnie
I have done a fair amount of research into WWI (1914 – 1918), and because of this I have developed a real admiration for the young men and women who fought and died in unfamiliar places like Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele. It was hell on earth with the “mustard�� gas, the relentless mud, the rotting trench feet, and the barbarity in general, and their sacrifices should never ever be forgotten. Because of this, Fallen Snow , by John J Kelley [Stone Cabin Press, December 19, 2012] appealed to me as an appropriate memorial.

The story follows the experience of one young man from the rural uplands of Virginia to the battlefields of Alsace Lorraine, France, and back again. However, the man who left Virginia is not the man who returned; not emotionally, anyhow. For want of a better name hey called it “shell sock” back then, but we now know it as PTSD (“Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.”)

Complicating this even further is the fact that Joshua Hunter is also gay, which in the context of the time and rural setting was yet another source of emotional distress.

Along the way he meets a variety of characters, each with their own story, but only Aiden has the strength to help Joshua come to grips with himself.



I thought the author did quite a good job of depicting the battlefield scenes, although I would have liked to see them a bit more stark to reflect the reality of it, and even though I am unfamiliar with Virginia, I was able to visualize the Appalachian setting quite well. I could also identify with the insular society of his village, and with his ultra-conservative family.

I understand this is John Kelley’s debut novel, and so I look forward to reading more. Four and one-half bees.
Profile Image for Nicole.
393 reviews
April 19, 2013
Well written, strong characters, a great read. And while I love a great sexy queer romance, there is a huge gap in realistic and non-sexual fiction that can rival the millions of hetero-romance novels out there. This book can stand up to those any day, with the likes of Sarah Waters or Emma Donoghue. I read through this book quickly, and was impressed with the narrative. The author obviously spent a significant amount of time going over historical details, and spent time developing and deeply understanding each character. It was so relatable and I felt invested in the characters by the end of the book.
A sweet love story, but juxtaposed against war and destruction—with ease. The main character, Joshua, was perfectly complimented by his first love, Aiden. I felt like I could actually see them sitting in the park together. I looked forward to their interactions, but I wanted to understand the whole story at the same time. I am eagerly awaiting a SEQUEL… hopefully there is another one coming SOON! ...with some Cutie Claire love, possibly with an artist :). I won this in a first-reads and am so happy to have been selected. Easily 5 stars, without any free-so-here-is-a-bonus-star guilt. Definitely going on the favorite books shelf in my bookcase. Many thanks to the author for the bookmarks—which I will happily hand out— and for the signed copy.
Profile Image for Barbara.
641 reviews47 followers
January 7, 2014
I thoroughly enjoyed this debut novel by John Kelley. I have a penchant for WWI era stories and this was pleasurable. The story goes back and forth between Joshua's time in the Army posted in the Lorraine region of France and his time after returning home to his small mountain town in Virginia. Another plus for me was the family dynamic and how the characters were all well written and came through the story with their voices. We often think that when we leave our homes and families that only we change, but this story illustrated how much things change for those that leave and those that stay. All the well written characters were completely believable. The author did a great job of tying in historic happenings to give the book a rich back story, the flu epidemic, lingering prejudice and war in Europe and Paris during the war. I loved the brother, Scott and his wonderful musical talent. Joshua's parent's relationship, while painful to read at times, was completely realistic. I read this as part of a book club I organize and can't wait to discuss "The Fallen Snow" with the other members. I eagerly await the next book by John Kelley.
Profile Image for Mary.
12 reviews
September 27, 2013
I got this book as a giveaway from the author. I had applied for it as it looked interesting and different. I did not realise what a treat had come my way. Once I picked it up I could not put it down. It gripped me from the start. The main character Joshua is developed from the start and becomes more rounded and attractive as the book goes on. The horrors of war are touched on but not allowed to overwhelm the main story which centres around Joshua and how he finds himself within all that is going on around him. Other characters are well drawn and believable. The changes that occur within Joshua are shown in the context of the whole. Although in parts it is sad I found it very touching and fulfilling and the end was not sad but life affirming. Not perhaps a story for everyone but it touched something deep in me and is a book I will never forget. It should be regarded as a classic. The author states he would wish this book to reach a larger audience - I will be passing it on for sharing and intend to get a Kindle version to keep myself. I will look forward to further books from this author.
Profile Image for Adam.
161 reviews27 followers
April 27, 2013
loved the writing style, set in Virginia, November 1918 - January 1919
our war hero, Joshua is home from France fighting in WWI, and reminisces over the past months overseas... the timeline of his past (written in italics) meets his present, and he is faced with dealing with the loss of his great love, a love of which his family would disapprove

his efforts to reestablish himself with small town Virginia life backfire, and... --I was dreading the ending as I am guilty here in thinking that one of the main characters would have to die for him to move on (one too many gay crime novels lately)-- ends very realistically with hope for a better life after that great love

"a fallen snow could open your eyes, help you see the beauty in the world"
1 review
January 28, 2013
I received this novel as part of a preview reading from a friend. And I now just read it again in its final published form.

I love this book. The characters and settings captured my heart after the first pages. From Paris and Montmartre in wartime France to the mountains of rural Virginia, the settings are vivid and fascinating. But what I love most are the characters - I can relate so much to Joshua and fell in love with Claire. I recommend this book to anyone that enjoys a great coming of age story and family drama. The book takes you through a lot of emotions, and has a few twists that will catch you off guard - be prepared.
288 reviews1 follower
April 3, 2013
This was a very interesting and poignant story. It was about love found and lost and staying true to oneself. The plot was well developed and thought out. Although it would go back and forth from present to past, it was done in such a way as to make the story very understandable and to flow from beginning to end. It kept you wanting to know what was going to happen and what did happen.

For a great, page turning read, I highly recommend this book.
710 reviews
March 3, 2013
Wow! A very powerful story about the war to end all wars. Life was tough in that time period. People were not as accepting of different lifestyles, or even aware of how seeing and participating in the horrors of war could create such horrific internal hells in a person. John Kelley did a wonderful job in developing his characters. A very good read!
Profile Image for Robyn.
101 reviews3 followers
March 4, 2013
At first I didn't like the back and forth between the past and present because I was so caught up with the characters. The character development had me hooked and Kelley's writing style was smooth and captivating. I wish there was deeper development of the father and less so with the war buddies, but this was a lovely read.
17 reviews2 followers
March 17, 2013
This is a very moving storey. While it is set during WWI it is not a book about war, but rather a book about human lives and loves. The charachters have very real and relatable feelings and develop continuously throughout the book. Their happiness and pain resonste with the modern day. It was an enchanting read that I did not want to let go of, evem at the end.
Profile Image for Avid .
30 reviews
April 11, 2013
This was one of the best books I've read dealing with love and war and the tragedy that can come from either experience or the hope and strength that one can gain by surviving either. Why this is not on the war time lists for gay romances I have no idea. There are 5 other books there that definitely belong but the lack of "The Fallen Snow" leaves too wide a gap in the list.
Profile Image for Richard.
367 reviews2 followers
June 30, 2016
This is the story of a young Virginian who grew up in a remote mining/logging community who escaped home to see Europe and fight in WWI. It is also the story of a young Virginian who returns home to his remote community profoundly changed by what he has experienced in the war. It offers some excellent insights on those experiences.
Profile Image for Fern.
10 reviews1 follower
February 2, 2013
This is a book that I received from Goodreads. It was a story about love,loss and forgiveness. The story is told in flashbacks. It is about a soldier trying to make it back to living life in the now.
Profile Image for Susan Visser.
510 reviews4 followers
March 8, 2013
I loved the book. The story revolves around a young American soldier who enlists in WW1 where he discovers he is gay. The author very cleverly takes us through the time when Josh returns home after the war to his experiences during the war. Very well written! I highly recommend!
Profile Image for Suzanne.
9 reviews
March 14, 2013
Having had a broken heart, I can only say that Joshua's story was absolutely beautiful. So glad I found this book.
Profile Image for L. Eira.
Author 6 books11 followers
April 1, 2013
Loved it. Great love story with a wonderful historical background. Well written. A must read if you like historical (WWI) and/or love stories.
Profile Image for Kim Bullock.
46 reviews3 followers
June 12, 2017
Joshua Hunter, a young man recovering from a war injury, returns home to the mountains of western Virginia. Everyone expects him to pick up where he left off, but the war, and particularly his relationship with Aiden, a bold sergeant, has changed him irrevocably.

This is a beautiful, sensitively written debut novel about family, secrets, and the power of first love.
Profile Image for Bill.
339 reviews
January 13, 2022
A beautifully told story of a man who volunteers for the army during WWI and is sent to the trenches in France. He is profoundly affected by all that happens; the people he meets, the war itself. He returns to Virginia a wounded man, both physically and in spirit; yet slowly he comes back to life. Though the story focused on Joshua I especially liked the insights offered by the French nurse.
December 27, 2022
Fresh perspective on WW I

I generally believe I’ve read about WW I from every perspective at this point, but this definitely bright new insight into what the war and it’s aftermath would have been like for gay men from rural areas. A great story.
Profile Image for Aurora.
1,033 reviews33 followers
September 5, 2016
Name of Book: The Fallen Snow

Author: John J Kelley

ISBN: 978-0-9884148-0-8

Publisher: Stone Cabin Press

Type of book: Same-sex love, moments, World War I, forest, sniper, post-traumatic stress disorder, flashbacks, Virginia Hadley, 1918-1919, France

Year it was published: 2012

Summary:

In the fall of 1918 infantry sniper Joshua Hunter saves an ambushed patrol in the Bois le Prêtre forest of Lorraine . . . and then vanishes. Pulled from the rubble of an enemy bunker days later, he receives an award for valor and passage home to Hadley, a remote hamlet in Virginia’s western highlands. Reeling from war and influenza, Hadley could surely use a hero. Family and friends embrace him; an engagement is announced; a job is offered.

Yet all is not what it seems. Joshua experiences panics and can’t recall the incident that crippled him. He guards a secret too, one that grips tight like the icy air above his father’s quarry. Over the course of a Virginia winter and an echoed season in war-torn France, The Fallen Snow reveals his wide-eyed journey to the front and his ragged path back. Along the way he finds companions – a youth mourning a lost brother, a widowed nurse seeking a new life and Aiden, a bold sergeant escaping a vengeful father. While all of them touch Joshua, it is the strong yet nurturing Aiden who will awaken his heart, leaving him forever changed.

Set within a besieged Appalachian forest during a time of tragedy, The Fallen Snow charts an extraordinary coming of age, exploring how damaged souls learn to heal, and dare to grow.

Characters:

The characters are all well-drawn and complex; no flat characters exist in the book. Some characters I did enjoy besides Aiden and Josh are Josh's parents who did change throughout the book, as well as Katie and Claire who are also strong women; Claire for trying to find beauty within war, and Katie for standing up for herself and not just going along for the ride. I had some confusion with the minor characters and sometimes I forgot their roles. I recall there was an African-American character, but I cannot recall his name, and I would have liked to see and get to know more of Katie's parents in the book.

Theme:

Hold on to the good for they will slip away sooner or later

Plot:

This is written in third person narrative primarily from Josh's point of view, although we also have his mother Elisabeth and his younger brother Scott as well as some friends. The book alternates between post-war and from when Joshua arrived to fight in France. The flashbacks are italicized while 1919, I believe, is written without italicization. At the same time, there is a mirror between the past and present, in that Joshua is hesitant to accept himself, but at last does so, even at a tremendous sacrifice. I also found the French attitudes really interesting and different when comparing them to American ones.

Author Information:
(from goodreads.com)

born
in The United States

gender
male

website
http://www.thefallensnow.com

twitter username
johnjkelley

genre
Fiction, Historical Fiction, Gay And Lesbian

influences
Harper Lee, Armistead Maupin, E.M. Forster, Truman Capote

member since
January 2013

John Kelley is a fiction writer crafting tales about healing, growth and community. Born and raised in the Florida panhandle, he graduated from Virginia Tech and served as a military officer. After pursuing traditional careers for two decades, he devoted three years to researching and completing his first novel.

John is a member of The Writer’s Center and lives with his partner in Washington, DC, where he can often be found wandering Rock Creek Park when not hovering over his laptop at a local coffee shop.

John’s debut novel recounts the struggle of a young WWI sniper returning to a Virginia community reeling from war, influenza and economic collapse. The Fallen Snow recently received a Publishers Weekly starred review and earned an Honorable Mention nod at the ForeWord Reviews Book-of-the-Year Awards.

Opinion:

Although it wasn't a five star novel for me, but this will really blow a reader away. I enjoyed the descriptive scenery, the atmosphere of tension and uncertainty as well as learning more about the community that depends on forests and quarries for the livelihoods. The characters are really well drawn, both men and women that inhabited Hadley Virginia. I personally think this is a slow read type book because I felt that I missed a lot, at least in my opinion; and also, one has to be okay with same-sex love. Prior to this book, I've never really read a book that has same-sex couple, thus for me it seemed as if they were friends instead of lovers. Really different than what I thought the relationship will be.

Quick notes: I would like to thank the author for the opportunity to read and review the book.

4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

http://sveta-randomblog.blogspot.com/...
28 reviews1 follower
January 5, 2018
Good book, well written

I enjoyed reading Fallen Snow although books relating to war are not my usual go to books. The characters were likable and the story thought provoking.
Profile Image for Alisha Conkling.
246 reviews2 followers
February 27, 2021
I really enjoyed the descriptions of the mountains. Joshua Hunter is a sniper in WW 1 in 1918. This story tells of his time at the front and also his return home to VA.
Displaying 1 - 30 of 72 reviews

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