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Bird Feathers: A Guide...
 
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S. David Scott
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Bird Feathers: A Guide to North American Species

4.40  ·  Rating details ·  65 ratings  ·  4 reviews
This guide teaches birders to use the characteristics of wing types and feather morphology to identify feathers--not only by species but also by their place on the bird's body. The introductory chapters give a detailed overview of the feather--how feathers developed, the parts of a single feather, and the variety of types of feathers on a bird. In the feather identificatio ...more
ebook, 368 pages
Published May 9th 2014 by Stackpole Books (first published September 1st 2010)
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4.40  · 
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 ·  65 ratings  ·  4 reviews


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Nancy Grant
Jun 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An extremely useful discussion of the various feather types, with a superb photo gallery to help with field identification
Lisa
Jan 30, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: birders, naturalists
A comprehensive guide of everything you ever wanted to know about feathers and more. The first 60-some pages of text are well worth reading and cover everything from the history of feathers, reading fault bars to determine stress to the bird, why white feathers wear faster than colored feathers, to dynamics of flight. There are many amazing photos such as the one showing a hummingbird flight feather superimposed on a golden eagle flight feather and a close-up of an owl flight feather showing the ...more
Fernleaf
A fantastic guide to bird feathers, allowing (finally) you to compare a feather found in the woods with the pages here to determine a likely culprit. The introduction does contain a warning to the effect that it is illegal to possess wild bird feathers, although I do think they could have highlighted that fact a little more prominently. Great first section looks at the history of feathers, their structure and function, and the major flight styles of birds. Section 2 includes the actual photograp ...more
Eva John
Feb 07, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is not a novel to be read cover to cover, but a reference book and a very good one at that. The author makes it easy for all to use. I consider this particular guide an invaluable teaching aide for my basic birding class geared toward children and the novice birder.
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“In the late Cretaceous Period, a global catastrophe resulted in massive extinctions across the planet. Likely the consequence of a collision with a sizeable meteor, the ensuing devastation rid the world of Dinosauria, most of which had for some time already been losing ground on Earth. Many of the existing bird species died out as well, but a number survived-the relatives of the geese, ducks, loons, and other shorebirds that we know today. Vast open spaces across the globe were left relatively unoccupied, and the evolutionary process hastened to fill available niches. Bird life raced to the task, developing with impressive rapidity; within ten million years every order of birds that we know today, with the exception of small passerines, existed. Since the
early Jurassic, when birds first made their appearance, some 150,000 species of birds have inhabited the Earth. Today, nearly two hundred million years later, the number of bird species inhabiting the Earth sits at around 9,672 (Sibley and Monroe 1990).”
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