Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “To Steal Her Love” as Want to Read:
Blank 133x176
To Steal Her Love
 
by
Matti Yrjänä Joensuu
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

To Steal Her Love (Harjunpää #9)

3.58  ·  Rating details ·  106 Ratings  ·  12 Reviews
An exciting crime story that also gives a touching portrait of a young man thirsting for love, and of the police officer pursuing him.
ebook, 189 pages
Published July 1st 2008 by Arcadia Books (first published 1993)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about To Steal Her Love, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about To Steal Her Love

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Michael
Oct 29, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The only reason I can see someone hating this book is if it disturbed you too easily and that is quite a common occurence in this book and easily understandable. Even from someone who names this one of the top 3 best books of all time.

To follow this series you need not know what the previous books are about, they all center around Timo Harjunpaa and his family.

The plot is that a man known as Tweety breaks into women's houses and watches them sleep. He also..."Gives them some" while they're aslee
...more
Dan
Feb 13, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The prose in this book is fantastic. The plot is good, the narration is gripping and evocative even at mundane moments (especially with the main "criminal" character). The themes are reasonably complex and upper-level without feeling like a heavy high fiction novel.
The discussion of the inner workings of Helsinki police is frustrating to the point of laughter sometimes, and provides a unique examination of the welfare state which isn't in keeping with most other Scandinavian (I know Finland isn'
...more
Rob Kitchin
Jan 10, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
To Steal Her Love is a police procedural set in Helsinki, though not a mystery in that the reader knows the culprit from the start. Indeed, Joensuu’s narrative is divided into two strands. The first charts the half-real, half-fantasist world of Tweety, a young man obsessed with beautiful women, but who is unable to approach them, instead breaking into their homes in the middle of the night to watch them sleep. When he’s not doing that he’s hiding from his domineering mother, working as a cobbler ...more
Katie Grainger
This is more than a one dimensional crime novel, it had depth, great characters, injustice and surprises. I have never read a novel by a Finnish author or one that is set in Finland so this made a nice change from the usual FBI type crime novels which I usually end up reading. I think that European novels always have more of a realistic nature than American authored ones. All in all this is a very interesting read, my only comment would be that maybe if the bank robbery element had not been incl ...more
WakenPayne
Oct 21, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the best book I have ever read in my opinion. With that being the case I would rather people read The Priest Of Evil or The Stone Murders first instead of this one. Mainly because of the creepy villain "Tweety".

I did enjoy the plot very much of this book. It was something that I found engaging to read and continue with... despite it being disturbing in places. In this one I did feel sorry for Timo because of his relationship with his father.

So if you are looking for a disturbing crime no
...more
Pilvi
Aug 15, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: crime readers
The main thought after reading this book was that I'm very happy my boyfriend decided he didn't want to be a policeman after all :) It seems that all the bosses just wanted to make a career and not really cared if they stepped on several regular policemen and destroyed their careers. Those stupid bosses annoyed me so much that I can't understand why Harjunpää didn't quit. I would have!

Joensuu did a great job making Harjunpää a person who could really excist. All his troubles, worries and emotion
...more
Alex
Oct 16, 2011 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Is it possible for a book to peter out into the nothingness for its entire duration? That's exactly what this clumsily translated and poorly plotted crime novel does. Harjunpää is a non-character, investigating a man who dissolves as the book progresses, while simultaneously fighting off vague threats from inside the criminally underfunded police force. A bizarre accident in the dying pages serves only to compound the slipshod nature of the whole thing.

I think that even with a translation that w
...more
Petri
Mar 30, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good crime book (detective book). Tells about couple of different stories which keeps you tight to book. All mr. Harjunpääs books locates in Helsinki.

This time somebody seems to have access peoples homes during the night time. Nothing have stolen or broken?

Same time somebody murders people in Helsinki. Is it same person or...?
...more
Ken Fredette
Dec 31, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was a really good book, I can't wait for the next one. I won't give the story away, but it works out in the end. Harjunpää is a good cop and he has a lot of empathy for people. Come on Finland give us more books.
Milena
Jun 21, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I really liked this one! The second main character Tipi was very well constructed and very believable. This story is also somehow about how fragile we are and in what ways the human mind can go really really wrong. This crudeness even reminded me of my other favourite writer Chuck Palahniuk
Alison 1965
Bit of an odd one, this... Found it difficult to read and didn't engage me as much as similar Scandinavian Crime novels that I have read. Language was strange at times too - but this may be to do with the translation from the the Finnish. Wanted to give it 2.5 stars!
M
rated it really liked it
Jul 17, 2016
Jens Amundsen
rated it it was amazing
Sep 24, 2012
Pirjo
rated it really liked it
Oct 25, 2012
Heli
rated it it was ok
Aug 01, 2011
Jaana
rated it really liked it
Aug 05, 2014
Janne
rated it liked it
Jul 03, 2016
Pia
rated it liked it
Sep 05, 2012
Nina
rated it it was amazing
Aug 01, 2013
Pekka
rated it really liked it
Jan 11, 2013
Jakke
rated it really liked it
Jul 21, 2012
Sami
rated it liked it
Sep 09, 2013
Anu Kilpeläinen
rated it it was amazing
Jan 22, 2016
Marja Konttila
rated it really liked it
Mar 01, 2012
Peter Rylands
rated it liked it
Apr 03, 2015
Pasi
rated it really liked it
Jan 05, 2013
John May
rated it it was ok
Jun 16, 2013
Tarja B
rated it it was ok
Jul 27, 2017
Joonalaitinen
rated it liked it
Jul 08, 2013
Jaana
rated it really liked it
Jan 10, 2014
« previous 1 3 4 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
1130676
Matti Yrjänä Joensuu (born 1948) was a Finnish writer of crime fiction. He was awarded the State's Literature Prize (1982), Vuoden johtolanka prize (1985, 1994, 2004), and he was nominated for two Finlandias. He received the Martin Beck Award in 1987. He graduated as a police in 1973 and worked as a crime investigator at the Helsinki police station's violence group.

Joensuu wrote several novels abo
...more
More about Matti Yrjänä Joensuu...

Other Books in the Series

Harjunpää (1 - 10 of 11 books)
  • Väkivallan virkamies (Harjunpää #1)
  • Harjunpää ja pyromaani (Harjunpää #2)
  • Harjunpää ja kapteeni Karhu
  • Harjunpää ja ahdistelija (Harjunpää #4)
  • The Stone Murders (Harjunpää #5)
  • Harjunpää ja heimolaiset (Harjunpää #6)
  • Harjunpää et les Lois de l'amour (Harjunpää #7)
  • Harjunpää ja kiusantekijät
  • The Priest of Evil (Harjunpää #10)
  • Harjunpää ja rautahuone (Harjunpää, #11)

Share This Book