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Datapoint: The Lost Story of the Texans Who Invented the Personal Computer Revolution

really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  12 ratings  ·  2 reviews
Forget Apple and IBM. For that matter forget Silicon Valley. The first personal computer, a self-contained unit with its own programmable processor, display, keyboard, internal memory, telephone interface, and mass storage of data was born in San Antonio TX. US Patent number 224,415 was filed November 27, 1970 for a machine that is the direct lineal ancestor to the PC as ...more
Paperback, 330 pages
Published August 30th 2012 by Hugo House Publishers
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Tech Historian
Dec 30, 2017 rated it really liked it
If youre interested in the history of technology this book should be on your reading list. It describes one of the most underappreciated and underrated companies in the computer business.

The story is a good one and could have been great. Unfortunately the first third of the book reads like a polemic as the author asserts that Datapoint invented the Microprocessor and hes going to prove to you by repeating that ad nauseam.

The reality is that like most inventions multiple people played a part in
...more
Philip Hollenback
Engrossing story, but not as much technical details as I had hoped for.
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