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The Missing Chapter (Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries #7)

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3.8  ·  Rating details ·  341 Ratings  ·  28 Reviews
When a loudmouthed author gets silenced, Wolfe looks for the triggerman

The gun was fired close to Charles Childress’s head, and his were the only fingerprints on it, forcing the police to conclude that the author committed suicide. But his friends know this is impossible, because Childress loved himself far too much. He had just begun attracting fame, writing new mysteries
...more
ebook, 229 pages
Published November 13th 2012 by MysteriousPress.com/Open Road (first published December 1st 1993)
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lisa
Jan 04, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I started reading the Nero Wolfe books by Rex Stout years ago. A friend and I found them in a Half Price Books store, and we bought all the ones on the shelf, divided them up, and exchanged them when we had finished reading them. For a long time we both looked out for other books in the series that we didn’t have. It wasn’t until this past Cyber Monday that I discovered that Robert Goldsborough had continued the series and written eight additional Nero Wolfe novels, including a prequel telling t ...more
Dora
Jun 29, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Missing Chapter

It is somewhat surprising that Goldsborough chose the death of a continuator (one who continues writing a series after the original author has died) as the subject for this book since he himself has chosen to continue Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe series.

One of the problems I had with this book is that Goldsborough is dragging Archie and Nero into modern times with PCs but then the language has stayed more in tune with the 40s.
Mary
Jul 07, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Goldsborough continuations of the Nero Wolff series are something like a sugar high followed by a slightly disgruntled crash. They aren't bad but they are somewhat pale imitations of the real thing.
Alice Segura
Nov 21, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: finished-reading
Who did it?

Another mystery written by a suitable substitute for Rex Stout. Archie and Wolf are faced with more suspects than usual. A nasty writer was dead by suspected suicide and yet everyone around him had a reason to want him dead. Through twists and turns Wolf reveals the killer. This story is tightly woven and to reveal more details would make the reading less enjoyable.
Robert J. Sullivan
In Robert Goldsborough's “The Missing Chapter”, he continues the stories of Rex Stout's inestimable detective Nero Wolfe and his right hand man, Archie Goodwin, in their investigation of the death of a writer. The police called it suicide, but the writer's publisher wants Wolfe to find out if it was murder. Was he murdered by the possibly-crooked reviewer? The editor he got fired? The agent he fired? His hard-as-diamonds fiancee? Or was it someone else? As always, Wolfe doesn't let us down.

Golds
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Ed
May 10, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
#7 in Goldsborough's continuation of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe series (following 47 volumes by Stout). Humorously, a mystery series is being continued by another author after the death of the series creator - this parallels author Goldsborough continuing the series created by Rex Stout. Goldsborough continues to faithfully recreate the series characters of Wolfe, sidekick Archie and his female friend Lily, police officers Cramer, Stebbins and Rowcliff, etc. The plots were never the reason for readi ...more
bea
So before you read my review, I want you all to know that this is my first encounter with the Nero Wolfe series, so I cannot compare it to the other books. The story behind this book is quite interesting, too, about how this was the last book of the series, how he said goodbye, etc. So, please read my review with an open mind.

Like I said before, The Missing Chapter reminds me too much of Sherlock Holmes. There are a lot of differences though, like how Wolfe is VERY anti-social, how his assistant
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A.G. Lindsay
Apr 24, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mysteries
I've only read four of the Goldsborough Wolfe books, but this is the one I liked the least.

That should not have been the case. The set up was rich in fuel for Archie quips and other humor: the author is writing about himself, sort of: an author tapped to continue a popular mystery series commits suicide...or does he?

There's too much "missing" from this book, and yet other "business" is included for seemingly no reason.

Wolfe takes the case, certain the author, Childress, has been murdered, but ne
...more
Michael Brown
Third book in the new Nero Wolfe series by Goldsborough. Having read several later volumes I have now read one and two of his work. It is almost as if Mr. Stout were still writing. Goldsborough uses more current day references so we know this story is from the mid 70's but like Stout he keeps current affairs a bit vague unless the story calls for a specific reference. Partially forced by Archie and partially out his own curiosity ( his logic is a bit odd ) he undertakes to prove another suicide ...more
Travis
Oct 17, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
Love Rex Stout, but Goldsborough's Nero Wolfe novels have left me pretty underwelmed.
This is probably the best of them, but even that, it's not as good as my least favorite Stout book.

A writer, who has taken over writing a beloved mystery series ( cute bit of conceit, but references to it wear thin by the end of the book) dies. The police think it's suicide, but a friend of his thinks it's murder.
Archie convinces Wolfe to take the case, as it looks like easy money and the bank account is getting
...more
Marvin
Nov 27, 2012 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This is thin beer indeed. It's hard to tell if Goldsborough is trying to ape Stout and failing, or has just figured he really can't imitate Stout so he won't bother to try. The real turn-off is that the central character of Archie in this novel is merely a shadow of the self-confident, wise-assed charmer we once knew. Not because of any plot machinations or unexpected character development, you understand -- it's simply because Goldsborough lacks Stout's snap.

The self-referential plot involves t
...more
Pat
Sep 11, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
When a loudmouthed author gets silenced, Wolfe looks for the triggerman

The gun was fired close to Charles Childress’s head, and his were the only fingerprints on it, forcing the police to conclude that the author committed suicide. But his friends know this is impossible, because Childress loved himself far too much. He had just begun attracting fame, writing new mysteries starring the iconic Sergeant Barnstable, and he had bright hopes for the future. His publisher hires corpulent genius Nero W
...more
Nancy
Sep 22, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
It is always tricky to continue an iconic series with rabid fans of the author and the characters.

An amusing aspect of this "new generation" Nero Wolfe story is that it centers around the death of an author who was "continuing" a series by a much-revered mystery writer. As someone in that precise position, I suspect Goldsborough had a very good time writing this book.

I have read, and re-read most of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries and rank them among my favorite light mysteries. So, I was natur
...more
Mitch
Sep 06, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Like Goldsborough's other Nero Wolfe stories, this one is not bad, but not great. In this book, the murder victim is an author who was hired to continue a detective series after the originating author dies. Sorry, but that's a little too meta for my tastes. And once again, the author tries to capture the feel of Stout's original tone and comes close, but the banter between Wolfe and Archie feels off.

Still, it was a good effort. I'd say it's not a book you should go out and buy, but if you're a R
...more
Susan
Did author Charles Childress commit suicide, as the police think, or was he murdered as his publisher believes? The publisher is willing to pay Nero Wolfe to discover the truth. Childress was moderately successful writing (as does Goldsborough) sequels to a dead author's popular series; some complained that his plots didn't hold together very well (as this one doesn't). Wolfe and Archie get to criticize fiction in general and mysteries in particular, and Archie visits the author's home-town in r ...more
Bill
May 09, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Those of you who have read the Rex Stout canon, perhaps more than once, should be grateful to Robert Goldsborough for continuing and up dating this scrumptious series - one of the very best in mystery fiction.

He does it well, and in this episode, seems to be including a similar writer to himself as the murder victim - as always, Nero Wolfe and Archie's narrated tale is a delicious and a very tasty treat.
Jim
Feb 19, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was one of the better stories written by goldsborough but it was about a writer continuing a series after the original author dies and had a lot of negative comments about the process. This is exactly what goldsborough is doing. This is the most recent of his books and I will not be surprised if it is the last, which is a shame. I think he does a creditable job. "Satisfactory", as Nero Wolfe would say.
Beth E
Aug 22, 2016 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: cozy-mystery
The fictional author name "Darius Sawyer" in this book is an obvious tribute to Dorothy Sawyer. It drives me crazy every time I see the name, because the fictional mystery series by Darius Sawyer in this book is clearly in no way on the same level with the Peter Wimsey books.
Jeffrey Marks
Nov 16, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Amusing look at the murder of an author who is continuing a mystery series of a beloved character. The solution was a bit abrupt, but overall, this is one of the better books in the series.
Denise Kearney
Sep 19, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I Book- Early Bird Books-$1.99. Another Good Nero Wolfe mystery
Monica Willyard
I enjoyed the plot and the puzzle here.
Treva
May 29, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was one of the few murder mysteries that I actually bothered to figure out who did it and why prior to the reveal at the end.
Steven Freeman
Feb 01, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
Not quite Rex Stout, but pretty darn close. Still an enjoyable time with Archie and Wolfe.
Casey
Apr 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Best yet!

I have been enjoying Mr. Hillsborough's Nero Wolfe novels very much. This one particularly tickled my fancy. You'll understand when you read it.
Paul Kaperick
Jun 10, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great stuff.

Another great Nero Wolfe book from this author. What am I going to read when I finish these? Write more, Sir.
Gail
Aug 13, 2010 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mysteries
So-so mystery
M. White
Jul 13, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
well written continuation of the Nero Wolfe stories
Kim Osterback
rated it really liked it
Jan 28, 2017
Joe Storbeck
rated it really liked it
Nov 19, 2012
Susan Rogers
rated it it was amazing
May 18, 2014
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  • A Family Affair (Nero Wolfe, #46)
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Robert Goldsborough is an American author of mystery novels. He was born in 1937 and grew up in the Chicago area. Although he worked for 45 years for the Chicago Tribune and Advertising Age, he first came to prominence in the 1980s with the publication, with the approval of the estate of Rex Stout, of his Nero Wolfe mystery Murder in E Minor. Written privately for his mother back in 1978, shortly ...more
More about Robert Goldsborough...

Other Books in the Series

Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries (1 - 10 of 12 books)
  • Murder in E Minor
  • Death on Deadline
  • The Bloodied Ivy
  • The Last Coincidence (Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe)
  • Fade to Black
  • Silver Spire
  • Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries (Nero Wolfe Novels by Robert Goldsborough #8)
  • Murder in the Ball Park (Nero Wolfe Novels by Robert Goldsborough #9)
  • Archie in the Crosshairs
  • Stop the Presses!

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“I found Wolfe watching Fritz prepare dinner from the wooden chair with arms near the window that had been constructed to his specifications.” 0 likes
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